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Broad to be spoken to over tweet

George Dobell

May 28, 2014

Comments: 20 | Text size: A | A

The rope trick: Stuart Broad works with resistance bands, Chittagong, March 26, 2014
Stuart Broad will not be fined for formally disciplined for his tweet © Getty Images
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Stuart Broad is to be reminded of his responsibilities on social media following a complaint by the PCB and the Pakistan spinner, Saeed Ajmal.

Broad, England's captain in T20 cricket, incurred the anger of Ajmal and the Pakistan board after making comments on Twitter that could have been perceived as questioning the legality of the bowler's action.

ESPNcricinfo understands that Giles Clarke, the ECB chairman, has provided assurances that Broad will be spoken to and reminded of his responsibilities. He will not be fined or formally disciplined.

The incident started when Michael Vaughan, the former England captain, posted a still photograph of Ajmal bowling during the Championship match against Essex on Twitter with the caption "You are allowed 15 degrees of flex in your delivery swing.... #justsaying."

Broad then replied with the comment "This has to be a fake photo?!" before a further tweet stated: "Bowlers can bowl very differently in a lab while being tested compared to needing wickets in the middle."

Ajmal and the PCB interpreted the comments as a suggestion that the action he uses in a match situation is not the same as that used in testing. They also concluded that the comments insinuated that his action may not be legitimate. The PCB and Ajmal's agent then contacted the ECB to seek an explanation.

Ajmal, who played a large part in Pakistan's whitewash Test series victory over England in the UAE at the start of 2012, is currently playing for Worcestershire as an overseas player in the County Championship. He claimed 13 wickets in the victory over Essex, including a career-best haul of 7 for 19 in the second innings.

Ajmal's action has been tested and cleared by the ICC. No county umpires have reported his action this season.

"Broad's dig hurt me the most," Ajmal told pakpassion.net. "Former players will sit in the commentary box or wherever else and say some things for attention but you don't expect such things from a fellow professional cricketer who is still playing cricket. It was disappointing to read Broad's comments."

It is understood that Clarke phoned David Leatherdale, the chief executive of Worcestershire, on Wednesday morning and expressed his understanding of Ajmal's concerns.

"We are grateful for Mr Clarke's understanding," Umran Khan, Ajmal's agent told ESPNcricinfo. "The position of England captain comes with a responsibility and we hope Stuart Broad will bear this in mind when making comments than can be damaging and hurtful in the future."

George Dobell is a senior correspondent at ESPNcricinfo

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© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by JG2704 on (May 31, 2014, 9:38 GMT)

@markatnotts on (May 29, 2014, 8:06 GMT) It's kind of comical isn't it? KP was dismissed for internal stuff (regardless of whether we agree with it or not) and that was an ECB issue. If there is an issue here - and I think it's people making a mountain out of a molehill - then it is an ICC issue IMO. Personally I don't see anything wrong with a little freedom of speech and surely everyone should take those comms with a pinch of salt. It's not like Broad is saying what no one else has said but it seems to have touched a nerve there. Also it's not like he is the 1st or last bowler whose action will be questioned and not just because they are successful. Warne was a mare for English batsman but no one ever queried his action because there was nothing to query.

Still it must be a good day or so since we had a comment mentioning KP so I guess it's long overdue.

Posted by keptalittlelow on (May 29, 2014, 19:49 GMT)

We should not be discussing the mechanics of straightening the elbow of a bowler, it should be left to the experts and umpires, however what we should discuss whether a professional bowler should be allowed to question a fellow bowler's bowling legitimacy, no matter how much camouflage is applied.

Posted by   on (May 29, 2014, 13:22 GMT)

It is the duty of ICC officials to say whether a bowler's action is legal or not. No professional player currently playing should make such comments especially when he is a senior player and captain of his country albeit IT20. If the umpires officiating any match feel that a bowler whose action has been cleared in the past now has a suspicious action would surely report him to the authority, in this I presume ICC. Players like Broad and others show their immaturity and pettiness when they make such remarks.

Posted by   on (May 29, 2014, 13:14 GMT)

@Posted by JG2704 on (May 29, 2014, 12:30 GMT): Mate, it is published on 1 of cric info articles :

It has long been known that Ajmal bowls with a bend in his arm. That is not against the playing regulations for international cricket, though, and after exhaustive tests, the ICC concluded that his arm did not straighten by 15 degrees and therefore declared his action legitimate.

As part of the ICC testing procedure, match footage is used alongside videos made "in a lab" and compared to ensure it is identical. Umpires are then able to copy TV footage of bowlers in action and super-impose them on the testing footage to check that a bowlers' action has not subsequently deteriorated. It is understood by ESPNcricinfo that the umpires involved in the Pakistan-England series in the UAE used this facility to check that Ajmal's action was the same as when it was tested. They found it to be identical.

Posted by UK_Chap on (May 29, 2014, 13:08 GMT)

JG2704 : I have read a lot of your posts in the past, you comments tend to be fair and balanced, but in this case you seem to be in complete understanding and awfully forgiving of anything any England players say. That is understandable since you are an English fan. Pakistan players have never made any comments about any english players but that cannot be said in reverse, I do believe the issue of defamation /slander could be resolved by a court case. That would force all parties to either put up or shut up.

Posted by JG2704 on (May 29, 2014, 12:45 GMT)

@CodandChips on (May 29, 2014, 9:38 GMT) Is he ? I wouldn't have thought he was as I doubt he'd have played a full season of IPL. My reckoning is that he's free from the playing side of the contract but still bound not to say anything about the Eng situation for the time being

Posted by JG2704 on (May 29, 2014, 12:32 GMT)

@cisco420 on (May 29, 2014, 7:51 GMT) When has the ICC reprimanded a Pakistan player for comments he made about an English player's bowling action?....

Posted by JG2704 on (May 29, 2014, 12:30 GMT)

@Khurram S Chaudhry on (May 28, 2014, 20:58 GMT) Maybe he has it wrong but why should he not be able to voice concerns if he feels an opposition player has an unfair advantage? You say "ajmal has been passed by icc so this should end for ever"

Why should that be the end forever?

A player could start off his career with a perfectly legal action which then develops into an illegal one. Should that then be ignored because he has been passed once?

@Jasir Noor Memon on (May 29, 2014, 1:41 GMT) I guess Broad is concerned about it because Ajmal is an opponent and if he thinks there is the slightest chance he can get Ajmal to change his action (whether it be by ICC saying something or even Ajmal being affected whereby he changes it himself) to a degree where he is less successful then he will

Posted by CodandChips on (May 29, 2014, 9:38 GMT)

@markatnotts while I agree with what you say, I think KP is still centrally contracted, and therefore still employed by the ECB

Posted by markatnotts on (May 29, 2014, 8:06 GMT)

I wish some people would think before they comment. Ok Broad has been irresponsible on social media but it hardly warrants a life time ban! As for saying what would happen to KP if he had done this, precisely nothing as unlike Broad he is not employed by the ECB.

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