Interviews InterviewsRSS FeedFeeds

S Badrinath

'I need to learn to be easy on myself'

S Badrinath talks about his long wait on the sidelines and learning to take things easy

Interview by Sriram Veera

May 17, 2011

Comments: 54 | Text size: A | A

S Badrinath got to a fifty off 37 balls, Kolkata Knight Riders v Chennai Super Kings, IPL 2011, Kolkata, May 7, 2011
"I have this feeling that if you are good enough, nobody can stop you" © AFP
Enlarge
Related Links
Players/Officials: S Badrinath

You once went on record asking the selectors to give you a chance to succeed or fail. Has that anger dissolved now?
That was three years ago. It wasn't anger as such, but playing for India is something that has been [a desire] burning inside ever since I started playing cricket, when I was eight or nine years old. Now that I am there I hope I can seal my place.

Even your fans were afraid time was running out for you.
When you are playing sport, it's never nice that you are getting older. I was always very confident. There is not one day when I thought I would not make it - simply because I was playing good cricket. As long as you are playing good cricket, it's fine. I have this feeling that if you are good enough, nobody can stop you. That's what I believe in and that's what keeps me going.

Another aspect that I have laid a lot of importance on is fitness. I take a lot of pride in my fitness. Why do they say you're getting old or why do they differentiate? It's only because of fitness. And since I have always enjoyed my fitness, I have a lot of confidence in my work ethic and my fitness. I was confident that one day I'm going to make it.

Were you ever tempted to ask Dhoni, who is your captain at Chennai Super Kings, about the India selection?
I could have but I didn't, because I'm not a guy like that. If you are good enough, nobody can keep you out. I didn't want to go up to him. And he is also not a guy like that. He doesn't talk much. He just goes about his job and he knows me as a cricketer. So if someone is going to want me in the team, he is going to want me. But I always had confidence in myself and knew that things would come through.

How do you keep the frustration away? Have you spoken about it with any particular player?
I spend a lot of time with Mike Hussey. He too had to wait for international cricket quite a while. It's just the mindset, what he went through, how he went about doing it. It is heartening to hear that I had played a bit of international cricket before I turned 30; he said he hadn't played a single international game before he was 30. But obviously he is where he is. I have read his book and I've learnt a lot from him.

I have also learnt a lot from Matthew Hayden. But the most I have learnt is from Sachin [Tendulkar]. The little bit I have been inside the dressing room, I always try and learn from him. Just watching him practise and go out with sheer professionalism... And then someone like Rahul Dravid also. Of course, when it comes to leadership qualities, you can't keep MS Dhoni out. Having played with him, I think he is one of the fittest players to have played the game mentally. I always try and learn. I think I am a good student of the game.

In your first Test, you had a horrid time facing a great spell from Dale Steyn. And tongues started to wag again.
It was tough. It's going to play on your mind that people are writing shit about you. It happens with every cricketer. It was actually a learning curve. It was a tremendous spell Dale Steyn bowled. I was in the middle of a hurricane.

He is the best bowler in the world, but I learnt a lot. I knew exactly what I had to work on to play at the highest level. Like they say, you learn a lot more from your failures than your successes. I think I am a better player now.

I know how to go about things while playing at the international level. I think I should be really easy on myself while playing out there because I do well when I am enjoying myself out there. With CSK I have the comfort level. I can go out and express myself. I wasn't doing that earlier.

I'm a very intense person and I take everything seriously. I am a perfectionist in everything that I do. I try and write down a lot of things. It helps me track my progress. Every net session that I have been doing...

If someone comes up to me and says, "Go out there and enjoy yourself", that would probably help me. But if someone comes and says, "You have to do well, it's a pressure game", that wouldn't help me because I always put a lot of pressure on myself. So I have been trying to relax as much as I can.

 
 
"I have just been wanting to make a point. Not for selection or for someone else. It was just for myself "
 

When did that realisation sink in?
I was expecting too much from myself. Steve Waugh said in his book that he played his best in his last year. His mind was so right because he thought there was nothing to lose. Amazing he thought that so late. I am trying to get into that mindset. I try and do as much I can to get into the zone.

You lost out on a central contract soon after that Test series.
I was disappointed. Being out of contract means you are not part of the system. But I was not in the side, so the contract really didn't matter. I sat down before the season and saw where I was and where I wanted to go. That's what I tried to do this season. I have just been wanting to make a point. Not for selection or for someone else. It was just for myself. To to be honest, it's not been easy. It's been draining. And it's still not done, but I want to keep myself going.

For me, it's about how I apply my mind to the game. I know I'm good enough and it's just that I have to get it out there. Things that I have worked on over the last two years have to be tested. And I can't wait for them to be tested.

Has the IPL as a platform helped?
In domestic cricket I play only Indian players, but in IPL, if I'm playing against Mumbai and I hit [Lasith] Malinga for a four, people stand up and take notice. You get to play alongside and against international stars. It's just that the standard of cricket has been much higher in IPL than domestic cricket. For a player who hasn't been playing international cricket, this is the best platform you can get.

But this is not the only platform. It's Twenty20 cricket, and you can't be judged purely by IPL. Obviously there is a lot of skill involved, but judging a player should be a combination of his IPL and domestic performances.

If you were a selector when would you have selected yourself?
I don't know, actually, it's a tough question to answer. Everything happens for a reason. I have been maturing late. I have learnt along the way. You can see it in my batting. First year of IPL, or two-three years, I haven't been the same. I have improved a lot. Perhaps things don't come naturally to me and I have had to work on them. But I'm a much better cricketer now and looking forward to the West Indies tour.

How do you react to criticism? Sunil Gavaskar has praised you, some other have dissed you.
I am honoured that a great batsman like Gavaskar had such good words to say about me. Criticism is always going to be there when you are in the limelight. I spoke to Sachin about this before my Test debut. He told me that you are at the big stage, people are going to write good things and bad things about you. But at the end of the day, you want that. The trees with the most fruits get stones thrown at them. I thought that was great advice.

Sriram Veera is a staff writer at ESPNcricinfo

RSS Feeds: Sriram Veera

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by   on (May 20, 2011, 8:31 GMT)

The Indian selectors have this strange fixation for youngsters based on just some one off performance. Also, the growing number of fans, bred on a diet of T20 and ODIs etc. get dazzled by just the flash and dash. Players like Badri who have done the hard yards in domestic Cricket and performed consistently, need to be given a chance and backed. Badri may fail a couple of times but he needs to be persisted with. He has class written all over him and he is likely to succeed sooner than later. He should be the logical successor of Dravid or Laxman and should be groomed as such. It would really be a tragedy if based on one Test appearance he is discarded. Players like Raina, Rohit Sharma, Cheteshwar Pujara, Viarat Kohli, Rayyudu etc. are good in their own way. However, they need to keep performing at the domestic level and wait for their turn

Posted by manojettedi on (May 20, 2011, 4:30 GMT)

Take heart man. You are our Mike Hussey. You may be thirty by the time you platy Test Cricket, but you ll be the most valued player then. Keep going.

Posted by   on (May 20, 2011, 4:18 GMT)

Badri is definitely a deserving player but all you Rohit Sharma bashers be aware that Rohit is an exceptional talent...He has to be persevered with and the day he comes good am sure all of u will start going GAGA about him n how u always believed he shld be in the team........

Posted by manojettedi on (May 20, 2011, 3:59 GMT)

Take heart man. You are our Mike Hussey. You may be thirty by the time you platy Test Cricket, but you ll be the most valued player then. Keep going.

Posted by OnlyKaps on (May 20, 2011, 0:25 GMT)

Badri, this is the year mate! make the most of it. Stack up the runs and make your case so strong you cant be ignored. TN players have always had it difficult making India colours (TE Srinivasan, WV Raman, Ashwin, Kartik, Balaji ). Keep pegging away. Good luck

Posted by Pathiyal on (May 18, 2011, 13:53 GMT)

he is a v gud t20 player at times he has shown his class with faultless techniques. its a bit difficult to be a consistant batsman in t20s. i think he is going to be the most sought after test batsman for team India. i wish him best of luck, with which he can get into the team. the batsman inside him will take care of the rest.

Posted by irfans1 on (May 18, 2011, 11:55 GMT)

Badri mate, keep an eye on another place which could be empty in Indian batting line-up once Sachin call it a day :)... i hope, one day he will .

Posted by soorajiyer on (May 18, 2011, 1:30 GMT)

All the best Badri! Just believe you are the best and make most of the opportunities, get a double hundred friend!! India is in safe hands with folks like Kohli, Badri, Ashwin, Rahane coming through soon...

Posted by Umamahesh_Srigiriraju on (May 17, 2011, 23:00 GMT)

Such a late look-in for such a great talent and a humble student. Badri, just go out there and enjoy yourself. Many of us know what a talent you are. So, just relax, go out and enjoy yourself. Remember that there are six other batsmen who too have to take up their responsibilities. So, you shouldn't be killing yourself. Keep the blood flowing in your legs for half an hour or so out in the middle and success is going to come running to you. Go Badri go! Just enjoy yourself. You are too intense and honest a cricketer like Dravid. Both of you shouldn't be doing that to yourselves. Just relax and enjoy. Many of us are behind you and are praying for your success. Hearty Congratulations on getting selected.

Posted by InnocentGuy on (May 17, 2011, 22:47 GMT)

I don't like the way selectors always say "groom the youth for long term returns". Most Aussie stars we know played for the national side when they are around their 30s. The play much less compared to the Indian superstars, but their short stint is also a quality stint. Mike Hussey is the best example. He played after he was 30. We all know where he ranks. So what if Badri only gets to play 30 tests for India as compared to someone like Pujara or Kohli who can potentially play more than 100 tests? If those 30 tests, Badri plays like a champ and makes India win, then no one can ask for more! I hope he becomes India's middle order mainstay for the next 5-6 years.

Comments have now been closed for this article

FeedbackTop
Email Feedback Print
Share
E-mail
Feedback
Print
Sriram VeeraClose

    'Gupte could bowl any line and length at will'

My XI: Erapalli Prasanna on his favourite spin bowlers. First up: Subhash Gupte

    'I probably undersold myself as a batsman'

Derek Pringle on his unfulfilled international career, the 1992 World Cup final, cricket journalism, and more

    Why baseball trumps cricket at the movies

Rob Steen: Baseball movies are more ambitious and unabashedly American - always a draw at the box office
Bowling and pitching: the differences

    'I wouldn't set up a batsman by giving runs away'

Glenn McGrath on the method behind his metronomic consistency, and why aggression isn't about sledging

Fawad Alam's macho avatar

Ahmer Naqvi: He had fine numbers even before he sprouted facial hair. But it seems only now can Pakistanis take him seriously

News | Features Last 7 days

India disgraced themselves by not competing

MS Dhoni and the BCCI are to blame for a touring party that became too comfortable and compliant

'I couldn't bring myself to set a batsman up by giving him runs'

Glenn McGrath talks about the method behind his metronomic consistency, visualisation, and why aggression isn't about sledging

Errant elbows, and Priyanjan's shuffle

Plays of the day from the first ODI between Sri Lanka and Pakistan

Cricket cannot bend rules to accommodate chuckers

Maintaining a healthy balance between bat and ball does not mean the authorities must give those with dodgy actions leeway

Starting and ending with half-centuries, and 99 on debut

Also, Tamim's share of Bangladesh's runs, run out for a duck on debut, most Test wickets against Pakistan, and 40-year-old captains

News | Features Last 7 days