Mahela Jayawardene
Sri Lanka's captain and leading Test run scorer

You need to fight Australia for every run

Sri Lanka did well to move on from the Hobart defeat, defending a modest target to qualify for the CB Series finals. Now the last hurdle

Mahela Jayawardene

March 3, 2012

Comments: 57 | Text size: A | A

Lasith Malinga had Australia in early trouble, Australia v Sri Lanka, CB series, Melbourne, March 2, 2012
Bowled out of the park? Not for long © Getty Images
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It would mean a lot for us to beat Australia in the finals over the coming week. We have not won a tri-series here before, although we did beat Australia 2-1 last time we toured, in 2010. You come into these tournaments wanting to win and it is brilliant to have achieved our first goal of reaching the finals, but the hard work is yet to come.

Australia are a tough opponent. They will come hard at us in the first final so it's important we keep calm and play our natural game. We have been handling the tough situations better than them in the past few matches and we need to keep doing that.

It has been a fun four weeks so far. This series has been a good challenge and the youngsters are really stepping up. Dinesh Chandimal has been right at the top of the list as far as consistency is concerned. He has handled tough situations really well and has been the standout among our younger guys. But everyone else has stepped up as well. Tillakaratne Dilshan has had a really good series, Kumar Sangakkara is back in his usual rhythm after a slow start, and Lahiru Thirimanne, who is still gaining experience, has shown he is a very competent player.

Our lower middle-order batsmen don't have as much experience as the top order but they are learning all the time. They might make the odd mistake here or there but they are still young and we need them to be able to handle tough situations. Then they can become very good long-term players for us. I'm backing them 100% to do the job.

The bowling unit has been very good as well. Lasith Malinga is leading the attack but a lot of guys - Rangana Herath, Nuwan Kulasekara, Farveez Maharoof, Thisara Perera - have performed at different times. It has been a real collective effort. I was especially happy with the way the bowlers bounced back after losing to India in Hobart.

After that match we had a ten-minute meeting and all I said to the boys was that we know we can play much better cricket and that we would not suddenly become a worse side because of that loss. Our bowling unit did not become a worse one overnight. Everyone moved on from that, which is what good teams do. To come back in the next game and defend 238 against Australia with two bowlers getting injured showed a lot of character. I'm very proud of them.

We lost both Thisara and Angelo Mathews to injury during Friday's game. Unfortunately Thisara will not be able to play in the finals because of his back injury and will probably fly back home, but Angelo seems to be okay, and Farveez, who missed the Melbourne game with a sore back, is also getting better. We will assess them before the first final and make a call.

We know it will be tough to beat Australia in the finals but we will go in confident because we have beaten them in the last three matches. To beat Australia you have to compete with them. You need to fight with them for each run, each wicket. That's what we have been doing, and we have handled some situations better than them. We haven't let them take the game away from us. It's very important when you play Australia that you don't let them loose. You have to keep at them all the time.

I think they will still be confident because the matches have been closely fought. They haven't been big wins for us. In any format, the start is very important - that's when the platform is built. We've managed to keep Australia's openers quiet so far and hopefully we can do that in the finals as well. We have kept our plans to them nice and simple - bowling straight and adapting well to different surfaces.

From a personal point of view, it has been a good challenge to captain my country again. It was a position I could not refuse. There was work to be done in the team, and I knew I should take on the responsibility. This has also been our first series with a new coach, Graham Ford, who has introduced some new things into the set-up. We have been really happy with the last four weeks, after starting out with two losses.

There have been some issues along the way, including when Lahiru was run out backing up too far against India. I think we and the Indians handled the situation well. I don't think Lahiru had been given a warning before it, but he was at fault. I spoke to him about the rule afterward and told him he was leaving the crease too early and he understood that. He is not taking off too early anymore. He knows he can take a small start but not take advantage of it.

We are also playing without the DRS in this series. I am a big fan of the DRS because I think we should use whatever technology we can to help the umpires and improve the decision-making process. I'd love to be using it in this tournament but the umpiring has been pretty consistent and we have been happy with it.

It is one of the many things players cannot change, so we are focusing on the things we can control. That is what we must do to beat Australia, which will be a very tough challenge.

Sri Lanka captain Mahela Jayawardene is the country's leading Test run-scorer

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Posted by Indian_Lady on (March 6, 2012, 9:56 GMT)

To ProdigyB, If Australia could take India in they would happily do it, but they had no control over sri lanka. What you need to understand is Sri Lanka given you chances as they did in WC 11 final.

Posted by colombo62 on (March 5, 2012, 17:46 GMT)

Not only Mahela, all the sri lankan team had proved that they can do it. Mahela I am so proud that you took over the captaincy and had showed your colors. I wish you all the best for the 2nd game.

Posted by ProdigyA on (March 5, 2012, 15:31 GMT)

Mr Mahila, all this rubbish talk is all good but first have a heart. Have a heart large enough to accept that your guy was WRONG period and kick him on his back side. Instead of winning that he was "Little bit" his fault. and of course, have the heard heart to thank the aussies for putting you in the final.

Posted by Wolfpac on (March 5, 2012, 14:32 GMT)

Mahela your the best, a gentlemen of a cricketer

Posted by zenboomerang on (March 5, 2012, 9:21 GMT)

@Mahela Jayawardene...A great read from a very impressive captain who is both ruthless & a gentleman - hard to be both & pull it off so well :) ... Also a player who I have the utmost respect for... It is also good to get a Sri Lankan perspective with only Oz & Indian reporters writing articles - a pity & it should be corrected next series... Have always loved watching SL play in Oz & this series is just another example of 2 small countries playing some of the best cricket in the world today - compare it to Eng v Pak or SA v NZ in their ODI series... lol... Doesn't compare... Best of luck Mahela for the 2nd match & again prove the rest of the world wrong once again...

Posted by denwarlo70 on (March 5, 2012, 5:24 GMT)

@johnathonjosephs, the difference is back then, we Lankans we on the losing side in every match and now, the table has changed and so have the mind set of people I guess , ha ha ha ha,,,

Posted by Mark00 on (March 5, 2012, 5:20 GMT)

The problem with Mahela's captaincy is the same as his batting. He's afraid to rely on his instincts and innovate. He plays it "safe" and sticks rigidly to convention. That's fine for 90% of situations but it also means that he doesn't rise to challenges. We saw his failure as a captain and a batsman because he was afraid to step up. To his credit, he's done well at not getting in the way of other team-member's motivation and drive. As a result, Kula and other tail-enders rose to the challenge in a way that Mahela could have done twice as well if only he trusted himself more.

Posted by colombo62 on (March 5, 2012, 4:29 GMT)

Mahela we appreciate what you have done to the team. Your one of the best captain in the world and Sanga you too. God bless Sri Lanka.

Posted by colombo62 on (March 5, 2012, 4:26 GMT)

I liket to say something to Varunvinod06 all the commentators respect Mahela and also he is a good sportman nobdoy curse at our team. Matthew is great batsman,why should he be fine for what. Dhoni was fined. So stop harrasing our team. We are one of the best team in the world. We have to concentrate with our game. Good Luck SRI LANKA.

Posted by Harry_Kool on (March 5, 2012, 0:46 GMT)

You are not only a credit to your country, but a credit to cricket, Mahela. Best wishes for your future.

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Mahela JayawardeneClose
Mahela Jayawardene Elegant and prolific, Mahela Jayawardene is easily one of the best batsmen around. By a fair margin he is the highest run-getter for Sri Lanka, and on his way to becoming an all-time great. His excellent slip catching, and sharp captaincy - until early in 2009 - made him a big contributor to Sri Lanka's cause. He and Kumar Sangakkara hold the world record for the highest partnership in Tests, 624 for the third wicket, against South Africa in Colombo. Jayawardene is one of cricket's gentlemen: well-mannered, humble, intelligent and articulate.

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