Partners in prose

Some names that go well together on a scorecard, conjuring up visions of food, music or even spy movies

Steven Lynch

August 13, 2012

Comments: 46 | Text size: A | A

Phil Mustard and Graham Onions sit side by side for a Durham squad photo, April 6, 2010
Phil Mustard and Graham Onions: a tasty combo © Getty Images
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Blowin' in the wind ...
The allrounder Gareth Breese, who later played for Durham, won his only Test cap against India in Chennai in October 2002, when one of his team-mates was Chris Gayle. They had turned out together quite a few times for Jamaica - but now Breese and Gayle were playing for the Windies.

c Beet b Root
Derbyshire's teams either side of the Great War often featured wicketkeeper George Beet and Fred Root, a medium-pacer who later played for England after moving to Worcester. Although Beet was a keeper, there was only one instance of "c Beet b Root" for epicures to savour, the unfortunate batsman being Herbert Chaplin (another name to conjure with!) of Sussex at Derby in 1913.

Lillee c Willey b Dilley
This famous scorebook entry was recorded - not long after a commentator had pointed out the possibility of it happening - during the second innings of the first Test between Australia and England in Brisbane in 1979-80. It couldn't have happened before: this was Graham Dilley's Test debut. At Lord's in 1980 Viv Richards was "c Dilley b Willey" - Dilley was fielding as a substitute at the time.

Horne and Bell
In the Boxing Day Test against India in Wellington in 1998, New Zealand's batting was opened by the musical pair of Matthew Bell and Matt Horne. They played in seven further Tests together. And music lovers in New Zealand this winter could well be entertained by a battle between Andrew Strauss of England and the Kiwis' new South African-born fast bowler Neil Wagner.

Cook c Mustard b Onions
In a county game between Kent and Durham in 2007, Simon Cook was caught behind by keeper Phil Mustard off the bowling of the England fast bowler Graham Onions. All the Durham pair need for the ultimate fast-food feast is to come up against the Namibian allrounder Kola Burger.

Lee c Lee b Lee
During a Championship match at Lord's in June 1933, the Middlesex batsman Harry Lee was caught by his brother Frank off the bowling of another brother, Jack: the unique scorecard entry was "HW Lee c FS Lee b JW Lee 82". Harry later wrote: "I do not believe that brothers had ever before behaved so unbrotherly in a first-class game."

Lamb c Kourie b Rice
Playing for Western Province against Transvaal in Johannesburg in February 1980, Allan Lamb was caught by Alan Kourie off the bowling of Clive Rice. This was in the final of South Africa's domestic competition - but, sadly, the one-day one rather than the Currie Cup (in which Lamb was once c Cook b Rice for 130).

Butcher and Baker
Surrey in the 1970s often fielded teams including both Alan Butcher, the batsman who later played for England and now coaches Zimbabwe, and fast-medium bowler Ray Baker. John Arlott once mused on TV: "Butcher, Baker... but no sign of the candlestick maker."

Marks v Spencer
Playing for Oxford University against Sussex in the Parks in 1975, the future England offspinner Vic Marks was dismissed in each innings (caught by John Snow both times) by the burly medium-pacer John Spencer. In the same fixture the following year, played at Pagham, Victor returned the favour: Spencer b Marks 6.


Shane Bond celebrates after bowling Brian Lara, New Zealand v West Indies, 1st Test, Auckland, 4th day, March 12, 2006
Fleming and Bond: you can't hide from them © Getty Images
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Money, money, money
Bangladesh's new-ball pair in their one-day international against Zimbabwe in Mirpur in October 2009 were Dolar Mahmud and Rubel Hossain. It set off memories of Paul Franks and Vic Marks (again), not to mention the 1960s Glamorgan offspinner Euros Lewis...

Fleming and Bond
James Dignan, a frequent contributor to the Ask Steven page on Facebook (and thanks to other regulars for their suggestions for this article), recalled: "I still love the time when Henry Blofeld was commentating on a New Zealand Test involving [Stephen] Fleming and [Shane] Bond."

Steven Lynch is the editor of the Wisden Guide to International Cricket 2012

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Posted by   on (August 16, 2012, 18:10 GMT)

During the recent IPL,this one could have happened,but it didn't .

Chandidas C- Chandimal B - Chandila (Chandidas- double "Chandied")

But,poor Dinesh Chandimal never got a single game for RR : (

Posted by   on (August 16, 2012, 17:58 GMT)

How about this:

V.V.S Laxman C- U.W.M.B.C.A.Welegedera B- W.P.U.J.C Vaas

Posted by ambrishsundaram on (August 16, 2012, 13:49 GMT)

Not sure how many instances of these have occurred when Sri Lanka played but they would make an interesting pair.... c J.R.Ratnayeke b R.J.Ratnayeke and vice versa - c R.J.Ratnayeke b J.R.Ratnayeke....

Posted by NonStriker on (August 16, 2012, 2:24 GMT)

And then there was this: "The bowler's Holding the batsman's Willey"... supposedly uttered by Johnners at the Oval in 1976

Posted by balajik1968 on (August 15, 2012, 7:39 GMT)

Here's one for the gourmets. Wood, Rice, Wessels, Cook, Lamb, Butcher, Mustard, Onions, Root, Baker, Swan(n).

Posted by pchats_2000 on (August 15, 2012, 5:40 GMT)

One small question, do we have something connecting Holford, Holder & Holding. Since these three played together for sometime, atleast in domestic cricket.

Posted by   on (August 14, 2012, 17:30 GMT)

I guess on S.Africa's readmission to International cricket..they opened with Kepler "Wessels" and Jimmy "Cook", and also had Clive "Rice" in there for the initial few ODIs in India.

Posted by   on (August 14, 2012, 14:43 GMT)

......awesome:D cheesy :P

Posted by Jonathan_E on (August 14, 2012, 11:57 GMT)

England's 1948-49 tour of South Africa had two (unrelated) players called Mann: FG "George" was a middle-order batsman for England, NBF "Tufty" a slow left-arm spinner for South Africa. A particularly testing spell bowled by Tufty to George, eventually finishing with his dismissal, was memorably described by John Arlott as "Mann's inhumanity to Mann": however George returned the favour in the fifth test of the series, scoring an unbeaten century in the first innings, a fair amount of it off Tufty's bowling... although he was dismissed by Tufty for 2 in the second.

Posted by   on (August 14, 2012, 10:31 GMT)

And don't forget on their tour to NZ, the Zimbabweans lost their 1st wicket of that tour c James b Bond. And the score at the fall of that wicket - 007!

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Steven LynchClose
Steven Lynch Steven Lynch won the Wisden Cricket Monthly Christmas Quiz three years running before the then-editor said "I can't let you win it again, but would you like a job?" That lasted for 15 years, before he moved across to the Wisden website when that was set up in 2000. Following the merger of the two sites early in 2003 he was appointed as the global editor of Wisden Cricinfo. In June 2005 he became the deputy editor of Wisden Cricketers' Almanack. He continues to contribute the popular weekly "Ask Steven" question-and-answer column on ESPNcricinfo, and edits the Wisden Guide to International Cricket.

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