The error
Only Hot Spot could have saved Steve Tikolo. And the ICC's reluctance to deploy the technology cost the Kenyan dearly. Trying to defend a delivery from Rizwan Cheema that cut in, Tikolo played forward and was beaten. It seemed like the ball had taken a faint edge before hitting the front pad in line with the middle stump. Tikolo asked for a review. Even though Hawk Eye confirmed the path of the delivery was hitting the middle stump, but what could not be established was the inside edge. The ICC can say that the DRS has improved the decision making of the umpires considerably, but without all the technology glaring errors still make their way through.

The reprieve
Interestingly, one man who managed to avoid suffering injustice in a similar situation was Cheema. Thomas Odoyo earned an lbw as Billy Doctrove gave the decision against him but Cheema was quick to call in the DRS. A minute later the third umpire over-ruled the decision, having observed a thick inside edge that Doctrove had missed.

The 'oh-yes-oh-no' moment
The next ball Cheema failed to read the slower delivery from Obuya and went for glory. David Obuya, standing at mid-off, charged confidently to his right to get under the skier. For a moment everyone thought he had it right until suddenly Obuya realised he had not read the track of the ball and turned abruptly in the opposite direction. By then it was too late. The 5,500-strong crowd, who had come to the Kotla despite the host nation not being involved, enjoyed a brief chuckle.

Take two
James Ngoche delivered his first ball of the World Cup. It slipped down behind the legs of Ruvindu Gunasekera, who lunged forward to flick it but fumbled and missed the ball. Maurice Ouma, the Kenya wicketkeeper quickly picked ball, tried flicking the bails swiftly, missed it, kept his smile intact and ripped the bails off a fraction before the batsman dragged his feet to regain the lost ground. Replays confirmed Ouma was the winner. Ngoche was all smiles for getting his maiden World Cup wicket off his first ball. He could have doubled the tally had Seren Waters not shelled a straight drive from Jimmy Hansra at mid-off. Jonty Rhodes, Kenya's fielding consultant at the outset of the World Cup, would have winced at mistake if he was watching.

Poster of the day
"We don't care as long as India wins."