September 10, 2008

Another look at the best ODI batsmen

Stats analysis ranking the best ODI batsmen
88

It is with great interest that I read Ananth Narayanan's analysis of one-day players. Independently, our database provides a ranking of batsmen, which first of all adjusts each innings played according to batting conditions and the quality of the opposition bowling, then takes these adjusted scores and combines them with the scoring rate and also longevity in the game to provide a career batting quality measure. The results are given here below:

The best ODI batsmen
Rank Player Bat Quality M Runs Ave 100s R/100b
1 Sachin Tendulkar 94.69 417 15481 41.95 34 80.83
2 Vivian Richards 87.92 187 6692 46.80 10 89.83
3 Michael Bevan 87.08 232 6695 51.90 3 72.00
4 Ricky Ponting 83.05 301 10422 40.55 15 75.33
5 Michael Hussey 82.35 93 2252 52.37 1 78.83
6 Brian Lara 80.59 299 9952 38.72 12 75.83
7 Jacques Kallis 80.02 279 9107 42.36 11 67.50
8 Adam Gilchrist 79.09 287 9031 33.70 12 91.00
9 Sanath Jayasuriya 79.01 421 11977 30.63 20 85.33
10 Inzamam-ul-Haq 78.90 378 11054 37.22 8 69.83
11 Kevin Pietersen 78.12 82 2699 45.75 5 83.67
12 Sourav Ganguly 77.95 311 10476 37.82 16 68.00
13 Mahendra Singh Dhoni 77.31 120 3484 43.55 3 83.83
14 Mohammad Yousuf 77.19 269 8522 39.82 7 69.50
15 Dean Jones 77.03 164 5921 43.54 7 70.83
16 Rahul Dravid 76.91 333 10064 37.55 7 67.67
17 Mark Waugh 76.00 244 8162 37.79 12 73.83
18 Saeed Anwar 75.68 247 8263 36.72 11 75.50
19 Zaheer Abbas 75.47 62 2425 44.91 4 80.00
20 Desmond Haynes 75.08 238 8447 40.42 17 61.67
21 Andrew Symonds 75.02 193 4709 37.98 4 87.50
22 Aravinda de Silva 74.83 308 8977 33.75 11 78.33
23 Javed Miandad 74.69 233 7226 40.82 6 65.50
24 Mohammed Azharuddin 74.60 334 9058 35.66 4 71.50
25 Lance Klusener 74.48 171 3458 39.75 1 86.83
26 Matthew Hayden 74.19 161 5663 40.45 8 72.83
27 Gary Kirsten 73.58 185 6557 39.50 10 69.50
28 Gordon Greenidge 72.72 128 4963 43.54 6 62.67
29 Shivnarine Chanderpaul 72.17 235 7128 38.12 3 66.50
30 Hansie Cronje 71.84 188 5447 37.83 5 74.83

The top two players are, as with Ananth's scheme, Tendulkar and Richards, with the former enjoying a significant lead over the latter. Seven of Ananth's top ten are in our top ten. But whereas Ananth has Haynes, Javed Miandad and Symonds, we have Hussey, Lara and Kallis. Two notable absentees in Ananth's top 30 who rank quite highly in ours are Pietersen and Dhoni, 11th and 13th respectively.

Given that limited-overs cricket is all about scoring runs, and scoring them quickly,a much simpler algorithm to arrive at the best ODI batsmen is to multiply the batting average by the scoring rate, and divide the product by 1000 to reduce the magnitude of the result. This requires a minimum qualification of (in this case) 50 matches, otherwise the well known Canadian, Rizwan Cheema, heads the list after only three ODIs! This method will favour modern players because of increased scoring rates in modern times, but we find that Zaheer Abbas and Viv Richards still make the top eleven:

Combining batting average and scoring rate
Rank Player Index M Runs Ave
1 Michael Hussey 4.91 93 2457 57.14
2 Mahendra Singh Dhoni 4.33 120 3793 47.41
3 Vivian Richards 4.24 187 6721 47.00
4 Kevin Pietersen 4.19 82 2822 47.83
5 Zaheer Abbas 4.04 62 2572 47.63
6 Michael Bevan 3.99 232 6912 53.58
7 Sachin Tendulkar 3.79 417 16361 44.34
8 Andrew Symonds 3.76 193 5006 40.37
9 Lance Klusener 3.69 171 3576 41.10
10 Adam Gilchrist 3.48 287 9619 35.89
11 Ricky Ponting 3.48 301 11113 43.24

The largely-forgotten Klusener rates well, but apart from him, they all are prominent in the both Ananth's table, and mine above.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Harsh Thakor on January 18, 2010, 12:00 GMT

    Overall,I still rate Viv Richards ahead of Tendulkar in the one day format.No batsman has deat with bowling as mercillesly as Viv who reminded you of a tiger tearing flesh when batting in full flow.No batsman could turn the complexion of a match like him.Sachin was more consistent but did not dominate the bolwing to that extent.Remember Viv's 189 at Old Traford,153 not out at Melbourne and 138 not out in the 1979 World Cup final. I am surprised with the omission of Allan Lamb,a master one day batsman.He won many a spectacular win for England in the run chases.Remember his match-wiining effort against West Indies in the 1987 Reliance Cup and his scoring 18 runs of an over in 1987 in Australia to win a thriller. Javed Miandad,to me is among the 10 best with his master temperament.Zaheer Abbas was in his era amongst the 3 best one day batsman who displayed great improvisation.No batsman posessed his timing. [[ Alan Lamb is there, in the 56th position. How can we ignore a batsman who has scored over 4000 runs in both forms of cricket. Ananth: ]]

  • karthik on November 30, 2008, 8:18 GMT

    jayasuriya and the word consistent are opposites .. if its record breaking then afridi tops the list fastest 100 so many sixers .. criteria will be the player who has been most consistent over a long period .. with a good strike rate and helping his team win more often than not .. MORE OFTEN THAN NOT .. tats the key .. sachin has played 420 games obviously he cant keep winning games single handedly always

  • Nevil on November 1, 2008, 10:43 GMT

    Why is there a confusion in deciding who is the best ODI batsman ever.......ask Glenn, Warne, Donald, Wasim & Waqar and clearly they'll say that Tendulkar is the Best (well!! the bowlers I mentioned haven't bowled to Richards on regular basis........so take him away)

  • Ruwan on October 27, 2008, 12:01 GMT

    I think Ric's list indicate the 'best career ODI batting performances’ not the best ODI batsman. When you find the best laptop you should consider performance, features, price for value, etc. like that when you say 'The Best ODI Batsman’ to someone, he should be able to show the world that he could deliver best performance at different areas(performing in finals, record breaking performance in individual matches, destroying a bowler in an over, etc.). So The Best ODI Batsman is Jayasuriya and Best Career ODI Batting Performance from Sachin.

    Overall I don't think comparing batsmen who plays different time periods is a very good thing because the laws of the game and the thinking is changed over the years. And modern batsmen can get experiences from watching past matches. But it’s a good try.

  • karthik on October 26, 2008, 16:23 GMT

    keep wondering ... tats all i can say .. comparing arvinda de silva and sachin .. lol .. tats it i can only laugh .. except for 96 WC de silva has not done anything special ..

  • ARK. on October 25, 2008, 23:02 GMT

    Also while I think Richards' 189* off 170 against England's Willis-Botham-Underwood at Old Trafford in '84 was one of the greatest ODI knocks ever, I have it at no. 2 overall in the whole ODI history. To me, that and every other ODI knock ever played (or even that shall be played) pales in comparison to Richards' own 153* off 130 against Australia's Lillee-Thommo-Hogg on a unpredictable, fast, bouncy MCG track in '79. That was against arguably one of the three to five most devastating pace attacks ever in the most difficult of conditions. I think analysis done by you and Ananth should take into consideration the natural conditions besides the opposition. Not to mention individual match-winning innings.

    While Richards is the greatest ever ODI bat by miles, Sachin is not even the best since '90 (his era). At their best Lara, Gilly, D'Silva etc better him as match-winners. Also I wonder how the great Sachin got only his FIRST ODI 100 in Aus against Aus at 35 and avgs <30 there and in SA.

  • ARK. on October 19, 2008, 5:17 GMT

    Lara, Sachin, Jayasuriya, Gilchrist etc are pretenders to the throne of the one KING that was, is and shall remain Isaac Vivian Alexander Richards. He was the ONE amongst this lot that played on uncovered, fast, bouncy tracks; with zero protective gear (not even helmet!); no such batsman-protecting rules like one or two bouncers an over; AND all that against some of the greatest ever - a few might have bowled at 100+ mph - Snow, Lillee, Thomson, Imran, Walker, Dymock, Pascoe, Gilmour, Hogg, Hurst, Ward, Willis, Botham, Dilley, Kapil, Bakht, Nawaz, Jaffer, Hadlee, Chatfield etc.

    Those that have played since '90 lose tons of points on account of the numerous advantages they have had playing the game, esp in ODIs. And EVEN then, Sir Viv combines a avg of almost 50 with a sr of 90+. And that is despite those last 7 years till he retired in '91. With the advantages that bats since '90 have had, his ODI avg would have surpassed Bradman's test one and his sr would probably have been 600!

  • maneesh on October 17, 2008, 11:16 GMT

    about world records: records mean, you are a pioneer, and you are quicker than the rest to be there. to evaluate someone under records must be done by analysing his areas of success. for example, suchin's highest ODI score, highest ODI 50's, Highest 100's, Highest runs in an calendar year...etc falls under one catagory: accumulated runs. its like. you can tell that the person with most runs would get all these other records, plus have a good average and will be consistant. but jayasuriya is a bit different, i gotta admit. he has his name in many lists such as, speed, efficiency(how many runs he scores from boundaries), high scores(highest opening partnerships, test runs, 100's, 50's). hes got his name in many different branches of cricket. thats very abnormal for a man and thats where he is special. also must mention! hes most successfull agains India. so dont think his opposition is weak, specially if you are a aussie guy who wathced the CB series. :) good luck!!

  • maneesh on October 17, 2008, 11:02 GMT

    also its true, consistancy means reliability. who would you choose for your team right now to win a one day against some best team out of jayasuriya and Sachin? obviously Sachin. Now soon after the IPL, if you were asked to select the best for your team who would you select? i bet Sachin him self would ask you to select jayasuriya. why this change? the answer would be- you form matters alot. that can overpower consistancy. if in form, jayasuriya would be the most suitable one day batsman compared to any other inform batsmen. But in general, a lower order batsman would be much reliable than jayasuriya.

    also few funny things: someone has listed Sachin's number of appearances in grounds in his world records list.. they dont matter in the ODI performance do they?? i recon finding the best ODI batsman using statistical calculations would be a "gravitational field equation" coz it should consider: form, era, support from others, runs, average, speed, innings order, oposition..etc.

  • Maneesh on October 17, 2008, 10:49 GMT

    Thushar-"I think this list gives us more successful run accumulators and not necessarily greatest batsmen."

    Sajaad-"I would rate a player on how important his innings was to the achivement of a team's victory."

    i agree with the above guys. if you are an one day player and when you are out in the crease, only thing you think is how to win your game. Depending on the time you go to the crease, and the situation there, this plan varies. it could be waiting out their and accumilating runs or play in a hitout or getout fasion. Therefore ODI greatness is all about your performance under the given situation. What is match wining capability?? it is not the percentage of matches you won because that depends on the amount of matches you played, and your other fellow batsmen in the team who contributed. In that sense Ric's match wining capability of jayasuriya and Beven isnt quite logical. Either way, the top contesters for the #1 spot would be Sachin & Sanath.

  • Harsh Thakor on January 18, 2010, 12:00 GMT

    Overall,I still rate Viv Richards ahead of Tendulkar in the one day format.No batsman has deat with bowling as mercillesly as Viv who reminded you of a tiger tearing flesh when batting in full flow.No batsman could turn the complexion of a match like him.Sachin was more consistent but did not dominate the bolwing to that extent.Remember Viv's 189 at Old Traford,153 not out at Melbourne and 138 not out in the 1979 World Cup final. I am surprised with the omission of Allan Lamb,a master one day batsman.He won many a spectacular win for England in the run chases.Remember his match-wiining effort against West Indies in the 1987 Reliance Cup and his scoring 18 runs of an over in 1987 in Australia to win a thriller. Javed Miandad,to me is among the 10 best with his master temperament.Zaheer Abbas was in his era amongst the 3 best one day batsman who displayed great improvisation.No batsman posessed his timing. [[ Alan Lamb is there, in the 56th position. How can we ignore a batsman who has scored over 4000 runs in both forms of cricket. Ananth: ]]

  • karthik on November 30, 2008, 8:18 GMT

    jayasuriya and the word consistent are opposites .. if its record breaking then afridi tops the list fastest 100 so many sixers .. criteria will be the player who has been most consistent over a long period .. with a good strike rate and helping his team win more often than not .. MORE OFTEN THAN NOT .. tats the key .. sachin has played 420 games obviously he cant keep winning games single handedly always

  • Nevil on November 1, 2008, 10:43 GMT

    Why is there a confusion in deciding who is the best ODI batsman ever.......ask Glenn, Warne, Donald, Wasim & Waqar and clearly they'll say that Tendulkar is the Best (well!! the bowlers I mentioned haven't bowled to Richards on regular basis........so take him away)

  • Ruwan on October 27, 2008, 12:01 GMT

    I think Ric's list indicate the 'best career ODI batting performances’ not the best ODI batsman. When you find the best laptop you should consider performance, features, price for value, etc. like that when you say 'The Best ODI Batsman’ to someone, he should be able to show the world that he could deliver best performance at different areas(performing in finals, record breaking performance in individual matches, destroying a bowler in an over, etc.). So The Best ODI Batsman is Jayasuriya and Best Career ODI Batting Performance from Sachin.

    Overall I don't think comparing batsmen who plays different time periods is a very good thing because the laws of the game and the thinking is changed over the years. And modern batsmen can get experiences from watching past matches. But it’s a good try.

  • karthik on October 26, 2008, 16:23 GMT

    keep wondering ... tats all i can say .. comparing arvinda de silva and sachin .. lol .. tats it i can only laugh .. except for 96 WC de silva has not done anything special ..

  • ARK. on October 25, 2008, 23:02 GMT

    Also while I think Richards' 189* off 170 against England's Willis-Botham-Underwood at Old Trafford in '84 was one of the greatest ODI knocks ever, I have it at no. 2 overall in the whole ODI history. To me, that and every other ODI knock ever played (or even that shall be played) pales in comparison to Richards' own 153* off 130 against Australia's Lillee-Thommo-Hogg on a unpredictable, fast, bouncy MCG track in '79. That was against arguably one of the three to five most devastating pace attacks ever in the most difficult of conditions. I think analysis done by you and Ananth should take into consideration the natural conditions besides the opposition. Not to mention individual match-winning innings.

    While Richards is the greatest ever ODI bat by miles, Sachin is not even the best since '90 (his era). At their best Lara, Gilly, D'Silva etc better him as match-winners. Also I wonder how the great Sachin got only his FIRST ODI 100 in Aus against Aus at 35 and avgs <30 there and in SA.

  • ARK. on October 19, 2008, 5:17 GMT

    Lara, Sachin, Jayasuriya, Gilchrist etc are pretenders to the throne of the one KING that was, is and shall remain Isaac Vivian Alexander Richards. He was the ONE amongst this lot that played on uncovered, fast, bouncy tracks; with zero protective gear (not even helmet!); no such batsman-protecting rules like one or two bouncers an over; AND all that against some of the greatest ever - a few might have bowled at 100+ mph - Snow, Lillee, Thomson, Imran, Walker, Dymock, Pascoe, Gilmour, Hogg, Hurst, Ward, Willis, Botham, Dilley, Kapil, Bakht, Nawaz, Jaffer, Hadlee, Chatfield etc.

    Those that have played since '90 lose tons of points on account of the numerous advantages they have had playing the game, esp in ODIs. And EVEN then, Sir Viv combines a avg of almost 50 with a sr of 90+. And that is despite those last 7 years till he retired in '91. With the advantages that bats since '90 have had, his ODI avg would have surpassed Bradman's test one and his sr would probably have been 600!

  • maneesh on October 17, 2008, 11:16 GMT

    about world records: records mean, you are a pioneer, and you are quicker than the rest to be there. to evaluate someone under records must be done by analysing his areas of success. for example, suchin's highest ODI score, highest ODI 50's, Highest 100's, Highest runs in an calendar year...etc falls under one catagory: accumulated runs. its like. you can tell that the person with most runs would get all these other records, plus have a good average and will be consistant. but jayasuriya is a bit different, i gotta admit. he has his name in many lists such as, speed, efficiency(how many runs he scores from boundaries), high scores(highest opening partnerships, test runs, 100's, 50's). hes got his name in many different branches of cricket. thats very abnormal for a man and thats where he is special. also must mention! hes most successfull agains India. so dont think his opposition is weak, specially if you are a aussie guy who wathced the CB series. :) good luck!!

  • maneesh on October 17, 2008, 11:02 GMT

    also its true, consistancy means reliability. who would you choose for your team right now to win a one day against some best team out of jayasuriya and Sachin? obviously Sachin. Now soon after the IPL, if you were asked to select the best for your team who would you select? i bet Sachin him self would ask you to select jayasuriya. why this change? the answer would be- you form matters alot. that can overpower consistancy. if in form, jayasuriya would be the most suitable one day batsman compared to any other inform batsmen. But in general, a lower order batsman would be much reliable than jayasuriya.

    also few funny things: someone has listed Sachin's number of appearances in grounds in his world records list.. they dont matter in the ODI performance do they?? i recon finding the best ODI batsman using statistical calculations would be a "gravitational field equation" coz it should consider: form, era, support from others, runs, average, speed, innings order, oposition..etc.

  • Maneesh on October 17, 2008, 10:49 GMT

    Thushar-"I think this list gives us more successful run accumulators and not necessarily greatest batsmen."

    Sajaad-"I would rate a player on how important his innings was to the achivement of a team's victory."

    i agree with the above guys. if you are an one day player and when you are out in the crease, only thing you think is how to win your game. Depending on the time you go to the crease, and the situation there, this plan varies. it could be waiting out their and accumilating runs or play in a hitout or getout fasion. Therefore ODI greatness is all about your performance under the given situation. What is match wining capability?? it is not the percentage of matches you won because that depends on the amount of matches you played, and your other fellow batsmen in the team who contributed. In that sense Ric's match wining capability of jayasuriya and Beven isnt quite logical. Either way, the top contesters for the #1 spot would be Sachin & Sanath.

  • sajaad on October 16, 2008, 7:35 GMT

    I would rate a player on how important his innings was to the achivement of a team's victory. Sadly to say, this is where Tendulkar lacks a bit though he is undoubtedly a genious!! I feel, players like Adam Gilchrist, Brian Lara, Inzamam Ul Haq, Sanath Jayasuria, Ricky Ponting and Jaques Kallis top the list because it is very difficult to find ODI matches where teams have failed to win when the above mentioned players have fired! For e.g If Jayasuria passes 45 runs Sri Lanka have won 95% of the time!! And also take unique and pressure situations for example the 2003 world cup 1st match, can anyone argue that Lara's was one of the best ODI innings ever seen not by the number of runs he scored but the way he did (WI were 67/1 after 25 overs!!!)This gives him more points in that aspect.Best performers at crunch games who top my list - Adam Gilchrist and Sanath Jayasuiya. Personally, i rate Jayasuria as the best ODI player ever (not batsman) because of his all round abilities.

  • karthk on October 9, 2008, 5:39 GMT

    How can you say that strike rate is the criteria for choosing the best ever ODI player ? Just cos Sanath has a strike rate of 90+ , he still has a poor average of 32 ! He and Sachin are both openers , have played equal number of ODI's . But Sachin has 41 hundereds , 16000 + runs, 43 average all this @ a staggering strike rate of 86 ! Where as Sanath has scored only 11000 + runs @ 32 avg with only a marginally higher strike rate . If U say that Sachin has not played well in finals , who won the CB series this January ? Sachin scored a 100 and a 90 ! Even the 1st 13 50's which Yuvi scored , India won . So even he has a high % of victories when he has scored ! Does that make Yuvi great ?? SACHIN IS THE BEST

  • Karthik on October 8, 2008, 16:09 GMT

    SACHIN HAS A STRIKE RATE OF 86 !!! THIS IS SOMETHING IMPOSSIBLE FOR ANY ONE WHO PLAYS THE GAME SELFISHLY IF THAT'S WHAT YOU PPL SAY .

  • sanathfan on October 8, 2008, 8:54 GMT

    Mr Naveen which weak bowling are you talking about - are Manoj Prabhakar, Prasad, Srinath, Kumble are weak bowlers. Akhtar, Waqar,Wasim, Shane Bond, Lee, Vetori, Sami, Aaqib Javed, Harris, Darren Gough, Jayasuriya blast all of them on time to time basis. When Lara has scored for West Indies in final. Sachin is famous to get out early in finals. Have you forgotten Sanath innings of 189 in finals at Sharjah. Have you forgotten his innings in Asia Cup final. Sanath is the greatest player ever produced in one day format. Why Sachin has not hit 250 sixes in one day. Why he can't score 50 in 17 balls even against Bangladesh also. You cannot leave your TV set if you are a Sanath fan.

  • sachin on October 8, 2008, 8:45 GMT

    Sanath is best. Don't talk about averages. Sachin has rarely scored runs in final. Sachin play for records. Just tell me when Sachin play like Sanath as he played the innings of 189. Can Sachin hit hundred in 40 odd balls. Can he hit 30 runs in a over. Can he dominate the bowling if India lose 4 early wickets. And you are talking about Brian Lara and Kallis who I find damn boring in one-day formats.

  • karthik on October 4, 2008, 14:57 GMT

    i disagree to pieterson figuring in the list simply because of the lack of consistency . KP is a great test player no doubt , but in ODI after the 2007 world cup he averages just over 31 and only ton in this period . Some may say this is a temporary slump but we need to remember a slump cannot exist for over a year . And we cannot rate jayasuriya very high simply because he scores runs at a fast rate .. then evensehwag will figure in the list . And for tat matter even shahid afridi will have to come in as when he strikes pakistan win . It is not a matter of whether the team wins when he plays well it is more how he often he plays well and helps the team win . There is no competition for the 1st place .It can be only Sachin . A few names which i found missing were Ranatunga , richie richardson , javed miandad and steve waugh .Though waugh may not have the average of the likes of sachin , we cannot forget his contributions . He was a big match player .

  • Naveen on October 3, 2008, 18:56 GMT

    I would not rate Jayasurya above Lara and Tendulkar, because Jayasurya has all his records against weak bowling opponents, where as Lara and Tendulkar often do it against quality bowling attack like Australia and Srilanka. I dont think that Jayasurya is a good quality player against a quality bowling line of Australia. Even Ponting and Steve Waugh could be rated as better batsman then Jayasurya. As they are technically and mentally much better players. And my dear friends, ODI not only means destructive batting but a consistent and destructive batting. So sachin, lara and ponting are far better players then jayasurya.

  • Bharat on October 3, 2008, 18:48 GMT

    Undoubtably Sachin is the best ODI batsman. As far as % of winning is concerned, sachin lacks support from his bowlers, when he delivers a ton. I don't think Jayasurya is best batsmen at all, as he gets upport from 2 all time great bowlers Murali and Vass. In my view Sachin is the best followed by Lara

  • Razin on September 18, 2008, 5:24 GMT

    After reading so many comments here it's clear that Ric's analysis is doubtful. Especially the place given to Bevan is too much while there are so many quality one day batsman are ranked under him. Brian Lara and Sanath should be before him.

    I strongly feel that Ric has no idea to differ One Day matches and Test Matches. As he has given the prority to AVERAGE we can see that batsman like Bevan and Sachin have come to the top. These two batsman are good in maintaining their Averages, but they have faied to enhance their runs in winning matches all of time. If they have played Test innings then it would be ok. With these so many doubts there is still a requirement for analyzing the best ODI batsman with new deciding factors suited for ODI format.

  • James on September 17, 2008, 10:29 GMT

    The argument I made was not about Sachin, it was why all other players are ranked higher. But, you should have just clicked ODI records on Cricinfo page and checked yourself that Sachin leads the ManOfMatch awards, not that I think this alone entitles him to be in the top of the list. It would take few pages to list his memorable innings, but just from last year- he won games against SA (at Belfast), England(Bristol, Oval), Pakistan (home), Australia( CB series finals). Its hard work to come up with objective criteria to rank batsman through the eras. Try suggesting criteria you think can improve the ones used by Ric, instead of claiming that one player should be ranked higher than the other. I am sure everyone has their favourite batsman, and many players through the years have signficantly contributed to the evolution of the game through their unique styles.

  • Kevin on September 17, 2008, 6:55 GMT

    To James, We have seen Sachin's batting, he couldn't do anything to avoid first round knock out by Bangladesh in last World Cup. Mr James can you tell me a single important match won because of Sachin???? We have seen Sachin's home was burnt after several World Cups. Is this because you are thinking he is such a good batsman?

  • Surendra on September 17, 2008, 6:36 GMT

    After reading so many comments I have understood that something wrong with Ric's Rankings method. There are so many doubts in his analysis. 1. Bevan has come to third place while there are so many better ODI batsmen have been ranked under him, especially Brian Lara,Sanath Jayasuriya,Chanderpaul, Ganguly and Aravinda de Silva should come before him. 2.He has considered Average as the main deciding factor while there are many factors should have really be taken in to consideration when selecting Best ODI batsman. If he has selected the best TEST Batsman then Average might be ok. We have seen when batsman is concentrating about his average his team is suffering from low run rate. For example most of occasion when Bevan scored above 50 Australia couldn't even reached to 200. 3.Ric has ranked Javed Miandad at 23 but actually he should be within top 10 or at least within first 15. 4.Ric has ranked Chanderpaul at 29 but who can justify this? Chanderpaul without a doubt should be within 10.

  • Prashant on September 17, 2008, 6:13 GMT

    For those claiming that the number of runs or longevity is not a criteria of greatness, ,all that can be said is that that is a most ridiculous and ignorant concept. Performance over time is one of the most basic pillars of greatness. Surely the batsman who averages say 50 for a period 20 years and 15000 runs has got to be superior to one who averages 50 for say 5 years and 5000 runs. No contest. I fully agree with some comments above, in that one of the filters to the list above must be not only the number of runs scored but the number of years they were scored over. There's tons of batsmen out there who have had a few good seasons or years. Only the very greatest can produce over long periods. So considering the length of a top batsman's career of approx.15 years, I would venture that if a batsman wants to rub shoulders with the likes of Tendulkar and Richards, surely the very least he should have done is to bat well over a period of several years ( about 7/8 at the very least).

  • Rushied on September 17, 2008, 1:36 GMT

    Are you all so short sighted, that you cannot see that Shiv. Chanderpaul is the greatest,and also the Michael Jackson of cricket (his mannerism when batting). I think he must be the reincarnation of Shiva.

  • Tushar on September 16, 2008, 12:29 GMT

    I think this list gives us more successful run accumulators and not necessarily greatest batsmen.

  • James on September 16, 2008, 10:12 GMT

    Take it cool Amladas (Eranga?) Most of the records listed for Jayasuriya are not current and arbitrary. In most ODI's, teams are not chasing over 300 runs, they require planning and not few swashbuckling sixes. Sachin/any top batsman in the list have shown in many games that if they need to accelerate they can do it an exhilarating manner too. You seem to somehow miss that every run scored contributes to a win. You mention Jayasuriya winning more games- his avg. is 41.90 in games won compared to Sachin avg. of 57.43. Sachin's World Cup exploits are no less spectacular-he carried Indian team through 2003 World Cup finals, and has been impressive in 1996, and 1999 World Cup. Has best record in World Cup for a reason, you would think. His quick scoring has helped him to be in top 10, even with a 30.63 avg. ODI is not street cricket to score few runs ,it is about playing with responsibility at the same time. Please relish that Jayasuriya is ranked so high in Ric's analysis.

  • Satyajit on September 16, 2008, 8:41 GMT

    Hmm so Eranga and friends (if there are actually many) would consider a record as record only if it is done by Sanath. Else it is waste of time. ;-).As per them Afridi and Yusuf Pathan would be best batsman in limited format as they try to hit everything and anything. Such great understanding of the game!

  • Sind on September 16, 2008, 4:57 GMT

    @vimalan. thanks vimalan. That should zip up Eranga. But besides the endless records..... How do you describe the sheer impact of Tendulkar? The back foot punches, cover drives on the up, the flicks to leg etc etc...all executed with that patented elegant economy of movement? If you ask me , even if Tendulkar didn't have a single record to his credit, just the sheer glory of his batsmanship would put him right up there.

  • Amaladas on September 16, 2008, 4:50 GMT

    to be cont.. Yes I have mentioned when we consider the match winning wise Jayasuriya is much ahead of Sachin.

    Here the facts, Because of Jayasuriya's performance weak Sri Lankan team was able to win 1996 World Cup.He was the most valuable player in that World Cup.

    In last World Cup (2007) also, because of his batting Sri Lankan team was able to reach Final, but we saw that Sachin was unable to do anything to avoid FIRST ROUND KNOCK OUT by BANGLADESH. Since 1996 World Cup till 2007 World Cup over 11 years of period Jayasuriya has done superbly to keep weak Sri Lankan team in high. But Sachin has done so many things to maintain his AVERAGE though he failed to do something in winning important matches in World Cup and in other important matches. It was clear even in last Asia Cup this year, 2008. Jayasuriya's 128 in the final ensured SRI LANKAN victory. So though you have better Average if you fail to contribute it in winning matches how we can say you are a good one day BATSMAN.

  • Amaladas on September 16, 2008, 4:35 GMT

    When we compare Sachin's records with Jayasuriya,we can see a big difference.Jayasuriya's all records (like fastest 50,most sixes in career,fastest 100...) indicate the speed that really want in winning ONEDAYS. But when we analyze Sachin's records it's clear that he has records like most 50 partnership with Ganguly, most number of nineties, most runs.....sometimes I feel whether Sachin has played ODI or TEST matches,and I have seen when Sachin reaches 90 he is wasting more balls to reach his 100 regardless of the match situation. It may be the reason people say when Sachin scores 100 India will definitely lose. But I have seen Jayasuriya's batting also just 12 to 15 balls to reach 100 from 70. Sometimes he doesn't even know he has scored a 100. When we consider Average wise Sachin is much ahead than Jayasuriya.There is another saying that Selfish batsmen always try to maintain a better AVERAGE though his team suffering from low RUN-RATE.

  • Vimalan on September 16, 2008, 3:20 GMT

    24. Most number of man of match awards against a single country, Australia - 11 25. Highest partnership for any wicket. 331 runs for 2nd wicket with Rahul Dravid against NZ in 1999. 26. Holds the highest 3rd wkt partnership of 237 again with Rahul Dravid against Kenya at Bristol in 1999 27. Holds the record of most 200+ partnerships in ODIs along with Ponting 28. Highest overall partnership runs by a pair with Ganguly. They have scored 8227 runs out of 176 ODIs. 29. Holds the most number of century partnerships with Ganguly - 26. Next best is 16. 30. Holds the most number of 50 partnerships with Ganguly - 29. 31. Most boundaries in ODIs - 1785. This info is not available for some of the players.

    Is that enough Mr. Eranga ???

  • Vimalan on September 16, 2008, 3:19 GMT

    11. Has scored over 1000 runs in a calendar year in ODI's 7 times ( 1994,96,97,98,2000,2003,2007) 12. Most runs in a calendar year - 1894 runs 1998 13. Crossed 1000 ODIs in three consecutive years ( 1996, 97 and 98 ) 14. Most number of centuries in a single year - 9 in 1998 15. Most centuries in tournament finals - 5 16. Highest average among those batsmen scoring over 5000 runs in matches won - 57.43 17. Most centuries and fifties in matches won. 30 and 53 respectively. 18. He is the highest run scorer in world cup matches (1,796 at an average of 59.87 as on 20 March 2007) 19. Most number of the man of the matches in the world cup 20. Most number of runs in the 1996 world cup - 523 runs at an average of 87.16 21. Most number of runs in the 2003 world cup - 673 runs at an average of 61.18 22. Most number of runs by any player in a single Cricket World Cup - 2003. 23. Player of the tournament in 2003 world cup

    (Cont.)

  • Vimalan on September 16, 2008, 3:18 GMT

    I don't know under how many names Mr Eranga go on boasting about Sanath's world records. If you still want to know the ODI records held by Sachin, here is the list for you.

    1. Highest Run scorer in the ODI - 16361 2. Most number of hundreds in the ODI - 42 3. Most number of nineties in the ODI - 17 4. Most number of Fifties in ODI's - 89 5. Most number of man of the matches - 57 6. Most number of man of the series - 13 7. Best average for man of the matches in ODI's 8. First Cricketer to pass 10000 run in the ODI 9. First Cricketer to pass 15000 run in the ODI 10. Was the fastest to reach 10,000 runs taking 259 innings and has the highest batting average among batsmen with over 10,000 ODI runs

    (Cont.)

  • Navin on September 16, 2008, 2:41 GMT

    What a sad state of affairs. This blog has become Jayasuriya vs the rest. Just because of some die hard Sri Lankans who don't know much about the game other than those 14 records. Only discussion now going in this blog is that is Jayasurya greatest or not. Rest 1766 ODI players are only being compared to him.

  • Ramesh on September 15, 2008, 14:19 GMT

    Dear Ric, As you have answered to Kanthan, if the selecting factor is only higher average then you can see you have done a big mistake after knowing there are more valid factors that has to get into consideration when selecting best ODI batsman.(as Kanthan has shown why should Jayasuriya come before Bevan))..definitely Jayasuriya is better than Beven..

  • Razin on September 15, 2008, 14:04 GMT

    To Ric, Kanthan has shown you some valid reasons to select Jayasuriya before Bevan.But you have answered it just because Bevan's high AVERAGE. This indicates that your calculations are wrong because you have only one reason to select Bevan than Jayasuriya, it's Bevan's better average. So when you make a blog just don't get players runs and make a equation till you get your choice on top. First know players well then consider all of their performance contribution records etc.

    Ric's comment: I didn't only consider average, Razin, scoring rate and longevity also were considered. These three aspects were combined together into one figure, using weightings that were fine-tuned, and seem to produce sensible outcomes. Bevan did not come out on top, as you said - Tendulkar was the top-ranked player - and we certainly don't fiddle with the numbers to make someone come out on top - we are above that, I think! Consider this, though: 47.4% of Jayasurya's innings are under 20 runs. Only 33.1% of Bevan's innings are under 20. I know who I would rather rely upon to do well in ODIs - and its not Jayasuriya! Its all very well to get blown away with Jayasuriya's occasional great displays of six-hitting, but there is more to batting than doing that.

  • Kanthan on September 15, 2008, 13:55 GMT

    to Ric, Thanks for the reply. If we are selecting best Test player your view is correct as Bevan's average is 53,since we are here selecting best one day batsman we can't rely only on averages. We should have considered contribution in terms of match winning like Jayasuriya has done over so many years and more than average Jayasuriya has 14 quality one day records.So your comments are very weak to prove that Beven is better one day player than Jayasuriya.

    Ric's comment: I don't agree with your view that averages count for nothing in one-day cricket - you still have to score runs to win! I have said before that I don't like including match results in an assessment of batting performance, since it is possible to be a brilliant batsman in a team that loses most of its matches. But if we let you have your way, then consider this: Bevan played in teams that won 66.81% of its matches, but Jayasuriya only won 52.97% of the matches in which he played. Using your logic, that would make Bevan a better batsman than Jayasuriya!

  • Satyajit on September 15, 2008, 13:50 GMT

    While the records I have given are good, I would rather look at an analysis like Ric's to assess a player and wouldn't wish one player or the other to the top slot just on the basis of some records.

  • Satyajit on September 15, 2008, 13:47 GMT

    From http://members.tripod.com/~kkv/sachin_tendulkar_records.htm 1.Highest ODI run-scorer in the world 2.41 ODI centuries 3.Played most number of ODIs (409) 4.Played most number of consecutive ODI matches (185 matches) 5.Most Man of the Match (53!) awards 6.Appeared on the most grounds (90 different grounds) 7.Most ODI runs by any batsman in any given calendar year - 1,894 ODI runs in 1998 8.Most Centuries by a player in one year - 9 ODI centuries in 1998 9.Most centuries vs. Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe. 10.Holds the record for scoring 1,000 ODI runs in six calendar year. 1994,96,97,98,2000 and 2003. 11.First and the fastest cricketer to cross 10K, 11K, 12K 12. Only one having 16K plus 13. Most runs in WC - 1,732 14. Most runs in single WC - 673 (2003) So, we can make up lots such records I guess! and yes http://padmasrinivas.blogspot.com/2008/02/records-held-by-sachin-tendulkar.html gives 70 records!

  • Kanthan on September 15, 2008, 12:31 GMT

    I have a doubt that how Beven has been selected to 3rd place. There are so many valid reason to list Jayasuriya before him. 1.his performance in 1996 worldcup to become most valuable player in that world cup. 2.his 14 world records during his career. 3.his contribution scoring 400+ runs to go Sri Lanka in last world cup also. 4.his 12000+ runs during his career. 5.His 27 centuries during the career 6.His contribution to weak Sri LankCn team to win 1996 World cup and to maintain that rhythm till last World Cup 2007 over 11 years.

    Ric can you pls explain how Beven has come before Jayasuriya just scoring only 6000+ runs???

    Ric's Comment: Sure, Kanthan - Bevan's average of 53.58 carries him well up the table. He is the only past player of more than 15 ODIs to average over 50 in that form of the game, and his average is a massive 65% larger than Jaysuriya's. Jayasuriya's strike rate and his longevity in the game carry him closer to Bevan, but he is unable to bridge the huge gap created by the difference in average. If you read the original blog, you will see that I have taken no notice of performances in individual tournaments, no notice of the number of centuries, no notice of the number of records currently or previously held, and no notice of how strong his team is - it is taken solely on innings played, runs scored, average and scoring rate, that is, the basic data of batting.

  • Razin on September 15, 2008, 12:18 GMT

    I found two world records under Sachin. Most runs in career 16000+ and Most hundred in career 40+ if u know more pls list here,Jayasuriya has held 14 world records but currently he is holding 11.It had been listed. I think these records may be helpful when deciding best ODI batsman.

  • Sagar on September 15, 2008, 10:53 GMT

    Cheers Ric for working on the list, although it is very difficult to rank players in different eras because of the many variables.

    -The argument that Sachin doesn't score enough runs in a winning cause is a misconception considering that very purpose of a run by any batsman is to set/win matches. To further it, Sachin avg. in games won is 57.43, 30(of 42) hundreds were in winning cause, and in perspective Richards avg. is 56.98, Inzamam avg. is 51.26, Ponting's avg. is 50.39. IMO, team rankings reflect the games won, and most appropriately Aus. leads the list.

    Records as a measure of batsman's quality? Sachin's record count is >14, though I am not sure if some of them are 'actual' records. Just a quick search shows that Sachin's count is 70. Give Sachin some credit, he has maintained an extraordinary avg/SR. IMO, he ranks one of the best bc. he is consistent while being explosive like Jayasuriya, Gibbs, Afridi.

  • Satyajit on September 15, 2008, 8:14 GMT

    In some other discussion in another website(maybe Rediff) I saw a thread which had described something like 30 world records associated to Sachin (I don't have a copy of that thread though). Cricket has lot of statistics, so if you want to, you can dig many records out of it. And if you are talking about somebody as good as Jayasuriya then that is truer. But that need not make that player greatest in particular format. Average (shows consistency and therby dependability) in any format of cricket matters and here Sanath loses out due to his 32 avg. I have great respect for Sanath (both his destructive batting and his humility off the field) but he is not greatest ODI batsman due to the consistency factor. Richards was equally destructive and far more consistent. Sachin fairly destructive and lot more dependable. Sanath is one of the greats in ODI but by far not greatest. Also please don't mention wickets taken in this analysis as it's for ODI batsmen and not ODI player (alrounder).

  • Eranga Abeygunawardane on September 15, 2008, 5:11 GMT

    To Saurabh. I'm not saying Jayasuriya was continuing same records but 14 times. As I have listed he has held 14 DIFFERENT NEW records.But every time Sachin scores a single he will continue the same record but not a new one.

  • saurabh somani on September 15, 2008, 4:38 GMT

    @ eranga: by that logic, Tendulkar makes a new world record everytime he scores a run, so he has held countless 'new' world records. Your posts are getting farcical. please wake up to the fact that anyone who has watched one day cricket has immense respect for Jayasuriya - not because he held x number of world records, but because of the player he is.

  • saurabh somani on September 15, 2008, 4:30 GMT

    nice study Ric, the concept of adjusting scores is a tempting one, and I would be very interested to know the methods you used to adjust scores and strike rates. Please do share them, if possible. P.S: of all the comments on this thread, fairguy is the one who has hit the nail squarely on the head!

    Ric's comment: An explanation would be too cumbersome here, Saurabh, but if you are interested, I have put an example of how it works on the Bulletin Board of my website at www.tastats.com.au

  • Navin on September 15, 2008, 4:26 GMT

    @ Eranga Abeygunawardane

    Sanath had added some new records and lost some all records. So he might not have had all the 14 records all together. His fastest 100 was broken in 1996. But the first wicket partnership record was added only in 2006

    In continuation to my earlier post. Inzamam had the luxury of Waqar and Wasim, Bevan had McGrath, Lee and Warne, Kallis & Klusener had Pollock, Donald, Ntini etc. Sanath had Vaas & Murali to rely. Viv had pace quartet for most part of his caerer. But on whom would Lara, Sachin and Shiv rely to win matches by restricting the opposition after they have scored good totals.

  • Razin on September 15, 2008, 4:21 GMT

    Best ODI Batsman....new look 1.Vivian Richard 2.Sanath Jayasuriya becauseof his 14 world records during his career, 27 centuries,12000 + runs, Most valuable player in 1996 World Cup,and he has lead Sri Lanka to go final in last World Cup also. 3.Brian Lara 4.Ricky Ponting 5.Adam Gilcrist 6.Saurav Ganguly - I have to name Saurav just before Sachin because of his match winning performance rather than Runs and Aver 7.Sachin Tendulkar 8.Inzamam 9.Jacques Kallis 10.Aravinda de Silva

  • Navin on September 15, 2008, 4:20 GMT

    Another thing about winning. Tendulkar,Lara,Shiv and all other WI batsmen post mid nineties will suffer. If winning was the sole criteria because Tendulkar neither had the luxury of match winning bowlers nor the batsmen to rely till 2000. Since 2000 when Ganguly and Dravid lifted their game did Tendulkar have the luxury of relying on them. Since then India also had some bowling power too. Lara and Shiv also had the same problem. All these batsmen did was to hold the batting together to last full quota of overs for most part of their careers.

  • Eranga Abeygunawardane on September 15, 2008, 4:03 GMT

    Small correction To James I'm not saying currently Jayasuriya is helding 14 world Records.But during his career he has held 14 NEW world records.But now two or three records may not be under him since Afridi has broken Jayasuriya's fastest 100 records.But he has held 14 NEW world records during his career.Now he is helding 10+ new records.

  • Zakin on September 15, 2008, 3:39 GMT

    It's strange to see Jayasuriya at ninth place. He has scored 12000 + runs and 27 centuries under him, he has held 14 world records also. It's strange to see Michael Beven at 3rd place only with 6000 runs. I cant understand how you have selected best ODI batsman with these douds. Before Beven definitely Jayasuriya should come and even Saeed Anwar, Brian Lara and Inzamam should also come before Beven

  • Navin on September 15, 2008, 3:34 GMT

    Of the above comments someone has listed Graeme Smith as he was ranked No. 1 in ICC ranking sometimes ago. Friends ICC ranking is a running ranking and somebody who plays brilliantly in say some 20 odd innings with a average of 60+ or something and a SR of say 85 will reach in top 5 if not the No.1 So he could be the greatest just because he was a No.1 for a certain time. Date this research a year back and DHONI would not be so much higher but he was NO.1 in ICC rankings in 2006.

    About winning or finishing matches I would like to say its a team effort, say a Australia posted 434 (ponting made 150+, ranked 4th here) but did not win. Was it Ponting's fault (might be as captain but not as a batsman)or the bowlers who just could not defend 434. Inzy made 120 odd but Pakistan could not chase 349 and fell short by 5 in Karachi 2004. The Bowlers conceeded just too many. Tendulkar in the same series made 100 but India fell short. In above case what was the fault of batsmen for not winning?

  • Rushied on September 15, 2008, 2:58 GMT

    Lets talk Statistics:If you were to take out the few innings where Lara made 300"s and 400. Where does that leave his average?

    Ric' comment: ??

  • Rushied on September 15, 2008, 2:10 GMT

    I am not sure what Cricket you are analyzing. But if you are watching the same cricket as I am,then your analysis is simplistic,since it placed Chandraupaul so low.

    Ric's comment: He's not ranked low, he comes in 29th in a total of 1767 players in ODI cricket. If you came in 29th in a race that had 1767 runners, I reckon you would be pretty pleased! You have not provided any statistical evidence to support your claim that Chanderpaul is ranked too low in my table. Who above him would you remove to have him ranked higher? Your post needs to add more to the debate, otherwise it has little value.

  • Marcus on September 14, 2008, 23:06 GMT

    Zakin

    What I meant is that Phelps set 7 world records in the pool based on the time to swim each race, PLUS the three world records he set with regards to how many golds he's won.

    As for the claim that if Jaysuriya scored 30, then Sri Lanka were guaranteed victory- can't you say the same about Gilchrist or Richards? In fact, their teams were both more successful than Sri Lanka, so either that's a false proposition, or Jayasuriya wasn't scoring 30 as often as he should have.

    You're damned if you do and you're damned if you don't, aren't you? Before we had all these protests when Tendulkar wasn't higher in the Test rankings, then the complaints with Richards coming behind Tendulkar in the one-day rankings, and now there are complaints that Jayasuriya is a pathetic nine- NINE! out of all the ODI batsmen in history. Jayasuriya is a geat batsmen, as Wally Hammond and Stan McCabe were great batsmen, but he isn't the greatest ODI batsman IMO.

  • Mamoon on September 14, 2008, 21:21 GMT

    All look good but best is not just who scores heavily but is someone who finishes it and wins it for the team -don't you think there should be a winning performance innings should be compared to their over-all innings - I am sure that would rate Bevan and even good old Inzy higher than Tendulkar. It shouldn't be how much you score but when you score. Remember going by those terms Inzamam's centuries are more than anyone's in a winning cause very closely followed by Rahul Dravid in the Test - so aren't they greater players in Test cricket??? Best in my view is someone who makes a team win - Inzamam's fifties were more valuable than Tendulkar's hundreds another example

    I rest my case

    Ric's comment: I take your point, Mamoon, you make some valid suggestions. I understand that winning a game of cricket is the endpoint of playing, but I am reluctant to include contributions to a winning team in my analysis; it is possible for the very best batsman to be part of the very worst team, and I guess we are analysing performances as batsmen per se, rather then viewing how these performances might impact on the result.

  • Eric on September 14, 2008, 19:55 GMT

    I find it strange that SA captain Graeme Smith, who until very recently was rated as ODI's number one batsman in the world, doesn't even feature in this list. Way to go Ric!!!

    Ric's comment: Well spotted, Eric! Smith suffers because of a relative lack of longevity, and a mediocre run rate - and his average isn't great, either. He actually comes in at 43rd on my first table, with a rating of 69.46, just below Sehwag, Michael Clarke and Steve Waugh. You will notice that his rating is not much below Cronje's 71.84, in 30th place - there is a veritable logjam of players around this score, and Smith gets pushed down through the simple volume of players around this band.

    In my second table (just using average and scoring rate, and applying a minimum qualification of 50 matches), he ranks 15th, which may please you more! His index of 3.33 is not far below Gilchrist and Ponting's 3.48 in equal 10th place.

    Our database has its own ranking of current batsmen - Smith is currently 5th, behind Hayden, Chanderpaul, Dhoni and Tendulkar.

  • fairguy on September 14, 2008, 18:44 GMT

    Just on the lighter side.. Eranga himself has set a record in this blog by posting under several names (I could count at least five lol :) )

  • Navin on September 14, 2008, 16:11 GMT

    Dear Ric, Ananth & David,

    You people spend so much time only to bring the detailed pictures to our eyes. Whether that detailed picture shows somebody in good or bad light is never your intention. But the blog has lost all its relevance when certain people will only create controversy by only talking their favourite as the best batsmen. Please screen such posts before posting ont othe web to avoid controversy.

    ONCE AGAIN GREAT JOB GUYS BUT YOU ARE EFFORTS ARE NOT TAKE IN RIGHT APPROACH. PLEASE SCREEN SUCH COMMENTS

    Ric's comment: I appreciate your comments, Navin, and I would hope all who post try and keep their comments relevant to the original blog. I am reluctant to censor too heavily, and so anyone who posts will get a fair hearing, but all should bear in mind that their reputation is totally dependent on the quality of their posts. I would never say this, but I suspect others might think that determining the best ODI batsmen by simply counting the number of records they hold is a bit flaky. I hope that most would think that the original blog started by Ananth and continued by me uses far more sophisticated statistical method that range over a variety of different variables.

  • James on September 14, 2008, 14:51 GMT

    Just decided to check upon this records list being posted by Eranga again and again. All of them have been checked using ODI records database from Cricinfo.

    Fastest 50 in ODI--Yes he holds this record. Fastest 100 ( he held this records)- 5th on the list! Most sixes in career-Yes, but has played twice as many matches as Afridi for just a few more sixes. Most sixes in an innings--Afridi shares this record with him at 11 sixes. Most runs in an over ( he held this records)--3rd on the list! Most runs in first 10 overs partnership-Is this arbitrary. Most runs in first 15 overs partnership-Is this arbitrary. Most first wicket partnership in ODI--Tendulkar/Ganguly Lead this at avg. of 47.55 compared to Attapatu/Jayasuriya at avg. of 39.29. Most consecutive one day 150s-Didn't know how to verify this, but Abbas leads with Anwar and Gibbs at 3 for consecutive hundreds.

    IMO, Jayasuriya is a very good ODI player and I have great respect for him but not the top batsman in ODI's

    Ric's comment: Thanks for this research and balanced comment at the end, James. Erangu is correct in saying that Jayasuriya is the only player to score consecutive 150s - vs England and the Netherlands in 2006.

  • Eranga Abeygunawardane on September 14, 2008, 14:05 GMT

    Vimalan, I'm not saying only because of Jayasuriya is holding 13 or 14 World Records that he is the world's best batsman but there is more. Jayasuriya was the 1996 World Cup most valuable player and because of his performance Sri Lanka was able to just beat Tendulkar and the Indian team easily in semi final and to select to final and win. When we consider the last World cup because of his performance Sri Lanka were able to go to the final. In the last World Cup also Jayasuriya has scored 400+ runs. But what could do Tendulkar to stop first round knocked out by Bangladesh in last World Cup. That's why we can say Jayasuriya is the world's best ODI batsman not because only he has held 14 WORLD RECORDS.

  • Eranga Abeygunawardane on September 14, 2008, 13:41 GMT

    Dear Vimalan, When the same topic is continued,we can say same thing. I have here mentioned Jayasuriya's records to make justice for his performance,sometimes when you see these records you may feel uncomfortable since when Jayasuriya comes to the top others have to come down.

  • Eranga Abeygunawardane on September 14, 2008, 13:37 GMT

    I have listed Nine world records of Jayasuriya in my previous comment. But Ric has added another record for him may be the only one Ric knows on him. But after analyzing I found more records held by him. 10.Highest first wicket partnership in Test cricket 642 with RS Mahanama against India. 11.Highest 1st wicket partnership in ODI against England in England. 12.Sri Lanka has the record for most runs in a Test innings (942) in that match Jayasuriya was the top scorer. 13.Sri Lanka has the the most runs in an ODI innings (452 ) in that match also Jayasuriya was the top scorer 152. 14.Sri Lanka has the the most runs in a 20Twenty innings (262 ) in that match also Jayasuriya was the top scorer 89.Under his name he has 14 world records.Very interesting who knows more about him? I have listed these records of him since these records will be helpful when we rank the batsmen.

  • Vimalan on September 14, 2008, 13:10 GMT

    I can only laugh at people claiming Jayasuriya as the greatest ODI batsman just because he holds some of the world records. Really funny.

    @Eranga

    Please stop posting the same comment about Jaya in each and every blog. You could do a better job by explaining us why he is better than all other greats instead of going on boasting about those few world records held by him.

  • Zakin on September 14, 2008, 12:02 GMT

    Dear Marcus, Hashim has asked you is there any other player who held more Records than Jayasuriya? According to you Micheal Phelps has only 7 world Records just two shorter than Jayasuriya.That means Jayasuriya is still MOST record holder IN THE WORLD.I haven't heard before and should be thankful to Hashim for revealing such a great records of him. We shouldn't bother about Averages in ODI since averages may be good for Test cricket.We have seen that Jayasuriya's 32 or 30 is always best than other's 40 or 100 since he scores 30 or 32 in just 17 or 18 deliveries ensuring Sri Lanken victory.I think Jayasuriya is still world best.

  • Marcus on September 14, 2008, 10:56 GMT

    Hashim

    Michael Phelps set 7 world records in the pool during the Beijing Olympics, and he's also won more golds than anyone at an individual Games, more golds than anyone overall, and I believe he's won more individual golds overall than any other swimmer (or indeed Olympian). That makes ten- all of which are something to be proud of!

    Ric mentioning Jayasuriya's duck record reminds me of what I heard about Babe Ruth- how he not only set the record for home runs, but for strike-outs as well. That's just how I feel about Jayasuriya- he has been kind of hit-and-miss throughout his career, and I believe that an average of 32-ish reflects that. Compare him to Adam Gilchrist, who scored more heavily at an equally good rate, or to Sachin Tendulkar or Mark Waugh- both of whom average in the mid-to-late 40s as openers with fine strike rates. That's not to say that I don't rate Jayasuriya highly, but I don't think he can be called the greatest ODI batsman ever.

  • Romesh on September 14, 2008, 8:36 GMT

    Is jayasuriya the most records holder in the WORLD???? I think Ric Finlay is trying to make a bad image on Jayasuriya.that's why he has ranked Jayasuriya at 9th place.It's wonderful to Jayasuriya at 9.As everyone knows he should be among top 3. Ric has discussed about Jayasuriya's 31 ducks as his 10 records.It indicates his knowledge on cricket and shows his anger on Jayasuriya. But I like to write here Jayasuriya's 10 th record to Ric to know 10.First ever Oneday batsman to score 12000 runs and to take 300 wickets. 11.Highest first wicket partnership in ODI against England in England 12.Sri lanka has the most runs record in ODI ( 452 )in that match Jayasuriya was the top scorer.

    I think Ric has not enough knowledge on Cricket.Before make a blog know Players well. As Hashim has discussed Jayasuriya is the Most Records HOLDER in the world. Ric if you know any other player than him pls include here then we can compare with Jayasuriya...

  • Hashim on September 14, 2008, 7:42 GMT

    As Eranga has listed Jayasuriya has initiated 9 World Records. I think there is no any player in ANY GAMES to held many records than him.What a wonderful player is he???? If anyone here knows about any player in Any GAME has held more records than Jayasuriya????if you know pls let us know as it will be interesting....Jayasuriya..the Best ODI Player EVER....

    Ric's Comment: I can add a 10th record - 31 ducks in ODI cricket, more than anyone else in that form of the game!

  • Peter on September 12, 2008, 9:18 GMT

    I'm agree with Eranga and I also feel that you have here selected the best TEST batsman since you have considered Runs and their Averages.

    When we analyze Jayasuriya's Real ODI records and contribution to weak sri lanken team to win 1996 World cup and to maintain the standard till now Jayasuriya is the best ODI batsman .

    Ric's comment: Its probably not an accident that the best Test batsmen are also the best ODI players. I would have thought that runs and averages were an integral part of any analysis of batsmen.

  • Razin on September 12, 2008, 9:04 GMT

    I think Eranga has proved that Jayasuriya is the best ODI batsman because here we talk about ODI batting not about the TEST batting.

  • Satyajit on September 12, 2008, 8:33 GMT

    Small correction for previous post. While Richards was destructive Sachin still IS consistent/dependable.

  • Satyajit on September 12, 2008, 7:47 GMT

    David Barry, that's a very sensible assessment! While Richards and Kapil were ahead of their time, other people are catching up with changing times. About the analysis on the whole, I feel it is slightly biased towards current batsmen (but then lot of great batsmen of yesteryear didn't know how to play ODI, take the example of Gavaskar who became an useful ODI player only at the fag end of his career. I would say Sachin and Richards are really at the top and much doesn't separate them when it comes to effectiveness. Richards was a little more destructive but then Sachin was a little more consistent/dependable.

  • Eranga Abeygunawardane on September 12, 2008, 3:28 GMT

    You have considered Runs and Averages to select the best ODI batsman. But scoring runs is just not enough to win ODI matches. If you have selected the best TEST batsman then your calculation would be correct. Keep in mind we are talking here about best ODI batsman.

    To win ODI matches,sometimes ones 30 may be helpful than others 100.There is a popular saying that if one well known batsman scores 100 his side will definitely loss.This is because of selfish batting. Selfish batsman always try to maintain good averages regardless the match situaltion.They waste 20 to 25 balls to reach his 100 from 90.

    But look at Jayasuriya’s batting.Just 12 to 15 balls to reach 100 from 70.Most of his 100, he has scored ensuring the opposition’s loss. By looking at Jayasuriya’s Records you can understand qualities that best ODI batsman should maintain. Fastest 50 in ODI Fastest 100 ( he held this records) Most sixes in career Most sixes in an inning Most runs in an over ( he held this records) Most runs in first 10 overs partnership Most runs in first 15 overs partnership Most first wicket partnership in ODI Most consecetive oneday 150s

    So is there any other better ODI batsman than JAYASURIYa???? If you know pls mention their ODI records also then we can compare with Jayasuriya. All of his records indicate the SPEED. That’s why people say if Jayasuriya scores 30 or 40 it will ensure Sri Lanken Victory.

  • David Barry on September 11, 2008, 23:18 GMT

    There's a fundamental difficulty with the cross-era comparisons in one-day cricket with strike rate. If you make no adjustments, then you bias everything very heavily towards the modern game. If you do adjust for era, then you're effectively doing a comparison of each batsman to his peers. That is usually a good idea, but in the case of strike rates I don't think it works. Viv Richards and Kapil Dev were a long way ahead of their peers in terms of scoring rates in the 1980's, but I don't think they'd be so far ahead today. They were simply ahead of their time - everyone else has now caught on to the idea that you should bat aggressively.

  • Zach Kramer on September 11, 2008, 22:17 GMT

    When the simplest measures of a ODI batsman's calibre - average and strike rate - are significantly higher for the second ranked palyer than the first ranked. You know something's wrong with the analysis.

    Longevity is important, but this argument is skewed against past players who played far less games than modern ones.

    The Master Blaster consistently got bigger scores faster, in an era where big scores were much less numerous and boundary ropes were further away. On top of that, team scores were significantly lower in Viv's era.

    It's kind of like saying that Kareem Abdul Jabar who holds the all time NBA point scoring record, was a greater player than Michael Jordan who was simply in a different class from anybody else.

    Suprisingly the Yanks would never make such an obvious analytical boo boo.

    Ric's comment: Clearly, the fact that Tendulkar has scored two-and-a-half times the number of runs that Richards did turns the analysis in favour of him. I accept that Richards did not have the same opportunity as Tendulkar has had, but longevity has to have some influence; it's just a matter of determining how much. If you want to consider just strike rate and average, then you look at my second table, where Richards lies third and Tendulkar seventh - but then you have others with less history occupying the top places.

  • Kartik on September 11, 2008, 18:01 GMT

    I think Ananth's final analysis is better. The list above is merely what it was in version 1 of Ananth's analysis.

    The problem here is that out of the top 14 players, only ONE is a player that retired before 2004. Clearly, this tells you that there is no accounting for the differences between eras.

    Ananth had 3 such pre-2004 players in the top-10, making it more believable.

  • Engle on September 11, 2008, 14:54 GMT

    The fact that players are shifting rankings on the various charts merely adds to the confusion of who's the greatest ODI batsman.

    Here's an idea. Come up with 10 different mathematical charts.

    Whoever leads on most of them is the winner.

  • Alim on September 11, 2008, 14:28 GMT

    I would think you need a minimum cap on the number of years played too. The great ones are always good enough to produce the goods over a long period. Not just the number of runs. Since this is an "All time great list"...the "Greats" almost by very definition should be able to perform consistently well over a period of several years. A lot of players can have the odd great season or even years. So a minimum of say 6 years(?) should be considered. Can't have a batsman rubbing shoulders with the giants of the game on the basis of a few good years.

  • Dimuthu Ratnayake on September 11, 2008, 14:23 GMT

    how outdated are these stats man? Jayasuriya has 27 centuries and Sachin i'm sure has about 42 or so. interesting but far too simplistic bit of calculation imho

    Ric's Comment: These are ADJUSTED runs, where, for each innings that is played, allowance is made for the batting conditions in the match, the innings, and the quality of the opposition bowlers. That is why these figures differ from the ACTUAL runs scored.

  • Peter Parker on September 11, 2008, 14:11 GMT

    I definitely think consistency should be a big factor in these ratings. How about taking the standard deviation from average for each batsman and incorporating that into the ratings? Need to give some thought to how not-outs will be handled in the calculation. It could also be possible to calculate strike rate consistency and factor that in - though just from watching the top players, I don't think that varies a lot from inning to inning. So it may not be worthwhile as a differentiator.

  • hylian lynk on September 11, 2008, 12:47 GMT

    I was wondering the same thing Ravi, it's hilarious where the stats put Kallis. I think commonsense will tell you this list is silly. How could Dhoni be rated better than Aravinda, Mark Waugh, Anwar and Symonds is way beyond me. By the way what years stats have been used there, both Tendulkar and Ponting have better stats now.

  • Ric Finlay on September 11, 2008, 12:34 GMT

    Bradluen asks how the longevity variable is calculated. It is simply the quantum of runs scored - basically, every 600 runs adds another point to the batting quality. Tommy's comment about Hussey can countered by the argument that he has batted in the middle order and in a strong batting lineup, doesn't often get the chance to score centuries. The reason only one of his two centuries is tabulated here is that all the runs shown are "adjusted" runs, and one of his centuries has been taken below 100 in this adjustment process. I appreciate Marcus' comment about Jayasuriya; his position is elevated somewhat due to his longevity in the game. His comment about consistency is interesting, and I shall have more to say about that at a later date. He also makes a good point about different scoring rates in different eras - we are never comparing apples with apples over a period of time, and this needs to be recognised.

  • Ravi on September 11, 2008, 11:34 GMT

    Jacques Kallis better ranked than Gilly, Jayasuriya, Ganguly, Inzy and Aravinda??

  • john on September 11, 2008, 11:27 GMT

    Looks better but I don't think Hussey, Dhoni or Pietersen should be there just yet.

    Ric's comment: I think you will find Dhoni and Pietersen will move further up the table as they get more history behind them, provided they maintain their current output.

  • Tommy P on September 11, 2008, 10:22 GMT

    No way is Hussey in the top 10 ODI batsman, let alone 1st. Statistics (largely the inflated average) clearly lie in this case - the guy has scored only 2 centuries (incidentally, you credit him with only one).

  • Tommy P on September 11, 2008, 10:22 GMT

    No way is Hussey in the top 10 ODI batsman, let alone 1st. Statistics (largely the inflated average) clearly lie in this case - the guy has scored only 2 centuries (incidentally, you credit him with only one).

    Ric's response: These are "adjusted" runs - the process of adjustment has taken one of his centuries to below 100. You will notice the runs scored is different too!

    I maintain it is possible to be the best one-day batsman and not score many centuries. Hussey regularly bats down the list and often, in a strongish batting line-up, has no opportunity to bat long enough to score a century.

  • Marcus on September 11, 2008, 9:14 GMT

    Have you considered tweaking your strike rate calculation by comparing it to the average strike rate of that decade or period? That way the earlier players could be judged on the times in which they played, rather than against players from different eras.

    Also, it strikes me that someone like Jayasuriya, who averages 30 in your weighted stats must be a fairly inconsistent batsman, yet due to his high SR he ranks higher than more consistent performers like Inzamam and Mark Waugh. Is there some scope for incorporating a "consistency" measure into your process? Something like an innings/50+ ratio would be a simple measure.

    Otherwise, another interesting interpretation of a fascinating topic.

  • Sind on September 11, 2008, 8:47 GMT

    Fair enough: Combine the viciousness of Richard's strokeplay with Bevan's clinical play,add a touch of innovation with the most gloriously allround batting genius ever seen,sprinkle liberally with Class.... and you get one Sachin Tendulkar!!!

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • Sind on September 11, 2008, 8:47 GMT

    Fair enough: Combine the viciousness of Richard's strokeplay with Bevan's clinical play,add a touch of innovation with the most gloriously allround batting genius ever seen,sprinkle liberally with Class.... and you get one Sachin Tendulkar!!!

  • Marcus on September 11, 2008, 9:14 GMT

    Have you considered tweaking your strike rate calculation by comparing it to the average strike rate of that decade or period? That way the earlier players could be judged on the times in which they played, rather than against players from different eras.

    Also, it strikes me that someone like Jayasuriya, who averages 30 in your weighted stats must be a fairly inconsistent batsman, yet due to his high SR he ranks higher than more consistent performers like Inzamam and Mark Waugh. Is there some scope for incorporating a "consistency" measure into your process? Something like an innings/50+ ratio would be a simple measure.

    Otherwise, another interesting interpretation of a fascinating topic.

  • Tommy P on September 11, 2008, 10:22 GMT

    No way is Hussey in the top 10 ODI batsman, let alone 1st. Statistics (largely the inflated average) clearly lie in this case - the guy has scored only 2 centuries (incidentally, you credit him with only one).

    Ric's response: These are "adjusted" runs - the process of adjustment has taken one of his centuries to below 100. You will notice the runs scored is different too!

    I maintain it is possible to be the best one-day batsman and not score many centuries. Hussey regularly bats down the list and often, in a strongish batting line-up, has no opportunity to bat long enough to score a century.

  • Tommy P on September 11, 2008, 10:22 GMT

    No way is Hussey in the top 10 ODI batsman, let alone 1st. Statistics (largely the inflated average) clearly lie in this case - the guy has scored only 2 centuries (incidentally, you credit him with only one).

  • john on September 11, 2008, 11:27 GMT

    Looks better but I don't think Hussey, Dhoni or Pietersen should be there just yet.

    Ric's comment: I think you will find Dhoni and Pietersen will move further up the table as they get more history behind them, provided they maintain their current output.

  • Ravi on September 11, 2008, 11:34 GMT

    Jacques Kallis better ranked than Gilly, Jayasuriya, Ganguly, Inzy and Aravinda??

  • Ric Finlay on September 11, 2008, 12:34 GMT

    Bradluen asks how the longevity variable is calculated. It is simply the quantum of runs scored - basically, every 600 runs adds another point to the batting quality. Tommy's comment about Hussey can countered by the argument that he has batted in the middle order and in a strong batting lineup, doesn't often get the chance to score centuries. The reason only one of his two centuries is tabulated here is that all the runs shown are "adjusted" runs, and one of his centuries has been taken below 100 in this adjustment process. I appreciate Marcus' comment about Jayasuriya; his position is elevated somewhat due to his longevity in the game. His comment about consistency is interesting, and I shall have more to say about that at a later date. He also makes a good point about different scoring rates in different eras - we are never comparing apples with apples over a period of time, and this needs to be recognised.

  • hylian lynk on September 11, 2008, 12:47 GMT

    I was wondering the same thing Ravi, it's hilarious where the stats put Kallis. I think commonsense will tell you this list is silly. How could Dhoni be rated better than Aravinda, Mark Waugh, Anwar and Symonds is way beyond me. By the way what years stats have been used there, both Tendulkar and Ponting have better stats now.

  • Peter Parker on September 11, 2008, 14:11 GMT

    I definitely think consistency should be a big factor in these ratings. How about taking the standard deviation from average for each batsman and incorporating that into the ratings? Need to give some thought to how not-outs will be handled in the calculation. It could also be possible to calculate strike rate consistency and factor that in - though just from watching the top players, I don't think that varies a lot from inning to inning. So it may not be worthwhile as a differentiator.

  • Dimuthu Ratnayake on September 11, 2008, 14:23 GMT

    how outdated are these stats man? Jayasuriya has 27 centuries and Sachin i'm sure has about 42 or so. interesting but far too simplistic bit of calculation imho

    Ric's Comment: These are ADJUSTED runs, where, for each innings that is played, allowance is made for the batting conditions in the match, the innings, and the quality of the opposition bowlers. That is why these figures differ from the ACTUAL runs scored.