Indian cricket June 15, 2010

Where are the Indian fast bowlers?

The strength of our fast bowling department or the lack of it is a serious concern and must be, in my view, addressed at once
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The strength of our fast bowling department or the lack of it is a serious concern and must be, in my view, addressed at once. The writing has been on the wall for quite some time and two consecutive failures, first in the World T20 and recently in Zimbabwe, just reinforced the gravity of the situation.

A lot of critics felt that one of the major reasons behind not winning a single match in the Super Eights of the World T20 was the absence of an extra quick bowler on seamer-friendly conditions in Barbados. And perhaps, it was an apt assessment. Understandably, not many could either understand or approve this rather baffling decision made by the captain. His lack of faith in a rookie could perhaps be the only reason that somewhat explains the move of not playing a fast bowler. I refuse to believe that he couldn't assess the pitch conditions accurately.

But why was a rookie picked to play in the World T20 anyway? What happened to the players in whom the selectors had invested their trust in the lead up to the world event? Well, obviously, selectors have lost faith in the Ishants and Munafs of Indian cricket. Point taken! But do we have their replacements ready? If the recently concluded tri-series is anything to go by, we are far from it. The second string of fast bowlers looked far from impressive.

That brings me to the million-dollar question: where are the fast bowlers? One look at the domestic season's statistics would tell you a completely different story. Eight out of the top ten wicket-takers in the country are fast bowlers. And it has been the case for the last few seasons. So, either the standard of batting is extremely poor in the country or the conditions are helping the quicks. In this case, it is the latter, for the domestic circuit is still producing enough quality batsmen who aren't found wanting even at the highest level. That leaves us with a simple conclusion - the conditions in India favour the quick bowlers! Yes, that's what is happening in first-class circuit in India.

There's a genuine attempt to make sporting tracks by the state associations but unfortunately, leaving grass and making it seamer-friendly is their idea of a sporting track. Since the quality of spin has gone down at domestic level and Indian batsmen are at ease against spin, most teams prefer a seamer-friendly track than a turning pitch.

An ordinary spinner may not survive but an average quick bowler can definitely thrive in India at the domestic level. The SG ball used in first-class cricket, if maintained properly, swings the entire day, which means fast bowlers are never out of action. Bowling longer spells is a good thing but this SG ball adds another dimension to it i.e. bowlers who release the ball are more effective than the ones who hit the deck hard. It's an open secret that you need to hit the pitch hard to be successful in international cricket unless you swing the ball, like Irfan used to initially. Also, the gap between two first-class games is only three days which leads to two things. One, the bowlers tend to preserve themselves and learn to bowl at a lesser optimum level, say 70% of their total capacity which explains relatively quick bowlers becoming medium pacers in a season. Secondly - the tracks need to be doctored a lot to give them assistance which leads to inflated figures.

Hence domestic tournaments may well be presenting a warped picture of a fast bowler's performance and hence cannot suffice for an appropriate yardstick to go by while picking one. Then there's the IPL in which a bowler is tested properly, or so they believe. After all, the pressure of the format and bowling to quality players would separate chalk from cheese. But sadly, that's not the case. You need to bowl only four overs in two or three spells in a T20 game which is too small a canvas to project the true colors of a player's temperament and talent. In any case, going for eight an over is par for the course which is almost blasphemous in fifty-over format.

Fast bowling is a physically gruelling job and demands high level of fitness. This is a rare breed which must be protected and nurtured. Identifying your best bowlers from the available options is the first step and then constant mentoring and monitoring is the need of the hour to have a big enough pool to sustain the hectic international calendar.

Former India opener Aakash Chopra is the author of Out of the Blue, an account of Rajasthan's 2010-11 Ranji Trophy victory. His website is here and his Twitter feed here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Kamal. Z.Ali on June 29, 2010, 10:20 GMT

    I do not agree with Akash on the dearth of quality fast bowlers. definitely there are many budding talents but wasted or gone haywhere when they grow up because they are not nurtured properly. We have the best facility in MRF Pace foundation to train the fast bowlers under the legend Dennis Lillee. but still we could not get quality fast bowlers. the BCCI authorities should stop their infights and should act on development of cricket.

  • Tharan on June 26, 2010, 6:07 GMT

    I think india has pace bowler but nt wicket first we need good seamer friendly track then u see pace bowler like shoiab or lee

  • sukdeo on June 24, 2010, 7:43 GMT

    Indians are predominantly vegetarians - keeps u healthy, but doenst give u strenght and stamina for quick bowling. Also, sports management is not one the strenghts of the Indian sport faculties. This needs to be addressed first before even contemplating the qualities required of a sportsman.

  • Manish on June 20, 2010, 18:18 GMT

    I can't believe that our country cannot produce a fast bowler!!! India makes a ordinary man from the streets a cricketer and makes him millionaire overnight...This guy over a period of time forgets that he plays for the nation and starts enjoying life...

    Look how fit out cricketers are......They fit in all the ads and add to the glamour of IPL parties!!!

    We need complete overhaul of the system and replace BCCI with a management body that will manage cricket as a sport!

  • praveen phadke on June 20, 2010, 12:08 GMT

    surely agree with bhanu rasala on his views.god knows what happens to indian rookie bowlers once they make a entry into the international foray. they just fade out after couple of series. its just that they get thrashed around the park in indian pitches and lose confidence. they stop bowling at raw pace and they stick on to line and length with not much of a result. we have seen this happen over the years with munaf,david johnson,dodda ganesh,gony, vrv singh and the list just goes on. dont know how does the mrf pace foundation help our youngsters? bcause we havent seen much of successful indian bowlers graduating from there. rp singh, sreesanth and ishant do possess the talent, its just that the selectors have to put faith in them and allow them to play for 2-3 series on the trot.

  • Venky on June 20, 2010, 9:49 GMT

    Unsure if I agree - a surfeit of T20s and one-dayers has reduced the need and in fact killed all prospects for aspiring spinners. Further, I am unsure if our batsmen have been stress-tested at International levels - let an India A team visit SA or Australia and the results will be obvious - these batsmen easily average 50+ in domestic circuits but will plod on in higher versions of the game. Selection follies have much to do with the overall results - Srikkanth swings between Southern overdose to complete lack of representation, the latter perhaps to balance criticism than talent. Balaji was and still is one of India's best pace bowlers but is in the wilderness. A surfeit of cricket in India overall is what will kill Indian cricket eventually and, yes, the Indian physique is a large contributor as well. Even when very well rested, an Indian bowler cannot match the pace and stamina of their Pakistani counterparts and this goes back to the days of Nissar and co.

  • Snowsnake on June 19, 2010, 22:36 GMT

    The problem with Indian bowlers is not that they can't ball over 140 KMPH, but that they don't want to so that they can avoid injuries. I don't blame them. Given that Indian players play the most cricket (including IPL), it only makes to conserve energy and minimize injuries. This is one of the side effects of IPL.

  • niles on June 19, 2010, 13:17 GMT

    and also i want to add the problem is that every kid in indai wants to be a batsman.no1 wants to be a bowler.but as soon as you offer money you wil see the guys turning to fast bowlin.and when i say i mean 150km/h plus.

  • niles on June 19, 2010, 13:16 GMT

    i have said this before.bcci please listen to my request.you have millions of dollars.we have the exact same wickets as pakisatn.why do they produce the fastest bowlers of all time?bbc use your money to do good.offer example 100 thousand u.s dollars to all new up and comin bowlers who can bowl consistenly at 150km/h

  • Rana on June 19, 2010, 13:14 GMT

    Taking point from your article, I can tell you why Indians fast bowlers cant bowl fast for longer duration in their careers. The reason is there is no competition among Fast bowlers. India has to take what is available. Then these fast bowlers relax after playing few matches and they know it as well that India does not have any other way to go but to just pick them. The second problem is diet of India fast bowlers. Since majority of Indian population is vegetarian so sports men from India does not get enough strength in their muscles to bowl fast or bowl fast for longer duration of times in their careers.

  • Kamal. Z.Ali on June 29, 2010, 10:20 GMT

    I do not agree with Akash on the dearth of quality fast bowlers. definitely there are many budding talents but wasted or gone haywhere when they grow up because they are not nurtured properly. We have the best facility in MRF Pace foundation to train the fast bowlers under the legend Dennis Lillee. but still we could not get quality fast bowlers. the BCCI authorities should stop their infights and should act on development of cricket.

  • Tharan on June 26, 2010, 6:07 GMT

    I think india has pace bowler but nt wicket first we need good seamer friendly track then u see pace bowler like shoiab or lee

  • sukdeo on June 24, 2010, 7:43 GMT

    Indians are predominantly vegetarians - keeps u healthy, but doenst give u strenght and stamina for quick bowling. Also, sports management is not one the strenghts of the Indian sport faculties. This needs to be addressed first before even contemplating the qualities required of a sportsman.

  • Manish on June 20, 2010, 18:18 GMT

    I can't believe that our country cannot produce a fast bowler!!! India makes a ordinary man from the streets a cricketer and makes him millionaire overnight...This guy over a period of time forgets that he plays for the nation and starts enjoying life...

    Look how fit out cricketers are......They fit in all the ads and add to the glamour of IPL parties!!!

    We need complete overhaul of the system and replace BCCI with a management body that will manage cricket as a sport!

  • praveen phadke on June 20, 2010, 12:08 GMT

    surely agree with bhanu rasala on his views.god knows what happens to indian rookie bowlers once they make a entry into the international foray. they just fade out after couple of series. its just that they get thrashed around the park in indian pitches and lose confidence. they stop bowling at raw pace and they stick on to line and length with not much of a result. we have seen this happen over the years with munaf,david johnson,dodda ganesh,gony, vrv singh and the list just goes on. dont know how does the mrf pace foundation help our youngsters? bcause we havent seen much of successful indian bowlers graduating from there. rp singh, sreesanth and ishant do possess the talent, its just that the selectors have to put faith in them and allow them to play for 2-3 series on the trot.

  • Venky on June 20, 2010, 9:49 GMT

    Unsure if I agree - a surfeit of T20s and one-dayers has reduced the need and in fact killed all prospects for aspiring spinners. Further, I am unsure if our batsmen have been stress-tested at International levels - let an India A team visit SA or Australia and the results will be obvious - these batsmen easily average 50+ in domestic circuits but will plod on in higher versions of the game. Selection follies have much to do with the overall results - Srikkanth swings between Southern overdose to complete lack of representation, the latter perhaps to balance criticism than talent. Balaji was and still is one of India's best pace bowlers but is in the wilderness. A surfeit of cricket in India overall is what will kill Indian cricket eventually and, yes, the Indian physique is a large contributor as well. Even when very well rested, an Indian bowler cannot match the pace and stamina of their Pakistani counterparts and this goes back to the days of Nissar and co.

  • Snowsnake on June 19, 2010, 22:36 GMT

    The problem with Indian bowlers is not that they can't ball over 140 KMPH, but that they don't want to so that they can avoid injuries. I don't blame them. Given that Indian players play the most cricket (including IPL), it only makes to conserve energy and minimize injuries. This is one of the side effects of IPL.

  • niles on June 19, 2010, 13:17 GMT

    and also i want to add the problem is that every kid in indai wants to be a batsman.no1 wants to be a bowler.but as soon as you offer money you wil see the guys turning to fast bowlin.and when i say i mean 150km/h plus.

  • niles on June 19, 2010, 13:16 GMT

    i have said this before.bcci please listen to my request.you have millions of dollars.we have the exact same wickets as pakisatn.why do they produce the fastest bowlers of all time?bbc use your money to do good.offer example 100 thousand u.s dollars to all new up and comin bowlers who can bowl consistenly at 150km/h

  • Rana on June 19, 2010, 13:14 GMT

    Taking point from your article, I can tell you why Indians fast bowlers cant bowl fast for longer duration in their careers. The reason is there is no competition among Fast bowlers. India has to take what is available. Then these fast bowlers relax after playing few matches and they know it as well that India does not have any other way to go but to just pick them. The second problem is diet of India fast bowlers. Since majority of Indian population is vegetarian so sports men from India does not get enough strength in their muscles to bowl fast or bowl fast for longer duration of times in their careers.

  • Harjinder Thandi on June 19, 2010, 13:11 GMT

    It remains a fact that in the recent past every time a new genuine fast bowler debuts for india (i.e zaheer, munaf, ishant, sreesanth, RP Singh) after intially bowling fast over 90mph for the first few months they then after cementing there place in the team cut down on pace down to 80mph or less!! Is it down to coaching? bowlers mentality? fitness? The indian hierachy need to sort this out as i'm sure the same will happen with the latest young indian quicks ( Dinda, Umesh Yadav, Mithun).

  • Prince on June 19, 2010, 10:54 GMT

    Nice blog akash india need fast bowlers who can bowl 150kph my name is prince now m 17 m an allrounder hitting deck hard but i never played a single club match just left it my question is why irfan not selected why he not getting a single chance give him new ball to bowl he is nice opening bowler and takes lots of wicket in his starting career

  • Ram on June 19, 2010, 7:43 GMT

    The dearth of pace bowlers is not surprising given that India is generally weak in sports. While most people in other countries count the number of medals their country wins, Indians are happy if India figures in the Olympic medals tally ( with perhaps a solitary bronze or so). There must be some deeper reasons why India is so weak in sports.

    To our luck we have had some exceptional sporting talents in Sachin, Dravid, Kapil Dev,Srinath, Vishvanathan Anand, Leander Paes etc. These sportsmen have somehow overcome the basic limitation the country itself faces in sports because they were exceptional. But the lesser mortals succumb to the basic cause that fails to produce quality sportsmen. The excuse that we have seamer friendly or seamer unfriendly pitches are pretty lame considering how rich BCCI is.

    Find out why India is generally weak in sports and address them. Then we will see India producing quality cricketers( pace bowlers) as well medallists in the Asian and Olympic games

  • singh aman on June 18, 2010, 23:49 GMT

    hello sir recent two or three series has constantly proved that we are far behind in our fast bowling department and new bowlers are not producing much than why not we keep faith in our experienced bowlers like irfan pathan who was very impressive in his ipl session in both format of the game.then R.p singh too is good ishant sharma is contantly bieng sitting out of the indian team.may be they failed toprove them in one or two series but we shouldnt not forget that our new bowlers are not doing any good either.i am specially concerned with irfan when he is performing in all levels of the game and batting and bowling good may be not superb as he used to be, but still bowling good than the new bowlers than why he is not given an oppurtunity

  • farhan on June 18, 2010, 15:39 GMT

    the only fast bowler that indians ever had is anil kumble come on guys they never had a shoaib waqar or lee like bowler and most probably they will never have a real fast bowler back to the point if there was a bowler who bowled fast for india it is anil kumble

  • Kartik on June 18, 2010, 15:37 GMT

    Great article Aakash. U hve hit the nail right on the head. It is really baffling to understand why cant India produce quality fast bowler when there is also the MRF pace foundation which works on nurturing the skills of the fast bowler. I think we need to start nurturing the talent from the very base level (atleast from the under 13 level), and make sure they have the right kind of training to make it to the international level.

  • desihungama on June 18, 2010, 14:31 GMT

    They all moved to Pakistan in 1947.

  • Raj on June 18, 2010, 14:22 GMT

    i completely agree,India seriously lacks in the fast bowling department.Look at other countries like Australia,they always have bowlers who can constantly bowl at more than 145kmph.India seriously need to address this issue,otherwise we are not going to win major ICC tournament.

  • Bhanu Rasala on June 18, 2010, 13:52 GMT

    Aakash - Excellent! article, this is what I have been looking for all these days from you and ever since a miserable performance by our boys shown in the recent ICC events, I was desperate. Yes, no more faith on Ishants and Munafs they are sent back to the domestics to proove their ability which is the right thing to do.

    I am just wondering about the scarcity of fast bowlers in such a huge country, we need to prepare atleast 5-6 pitches which would assist quickies which will intern help our batsmen to play the SHORT BALL as well. And our bench strength - where are the Mithuns and Gonis...have performed only in the IPL and not being tested on fast tracks.

    When we talk about spin, do you really think that we have a quality spinner after Kumble and Harbhajan who can win matches single handedly. We have tried a lot Chawla, Jadeja, Mishra, Ojha and now Ashwin. I am afraid of future spinners for India and one last word, I dont see a quickie bowling 150 kmp/h in near future for India.

  • Ramana Kumar on June 18, 2010, 13:30 GMT

    Absolutely agree with Akash's conclusions. It seems to be merely common-sense. It has been obvious for years. Why is it that the BCCI does seem to be able to do the obvious thing ? Encourage, nurture, mentor the fast bowling talent of the country, please ! If not, there is no way India can reach the top in all formats of the game. And stay in that position! And given the passion for the game from Indians, Indian fans deserve to have the worlds Top team.

  • venkateswaran on June 18, 2010, 11:02 GMT

    I fully agree with Akash Chopra. But the point he missd is that there is no tournament (50 overs) worth in India where we can identify talents. If u see the deodhar trophy, there was not one talented bowler who can be said as a future prospect. If that is the case with a premier one day tournament, then god alone can save India

  • venkat on June 18, 2010, 10:56 GMT

    While I appreciate the writer on his concerns, I strongly disagree with many of his points. Yes the second string attack has failed miserably in zimbabwe. But do not blame them entirely. They need to be shepherded properly & also require delciate handling.Had MS was available the result might be different for the success & the for the fast bowlers. Please do not condemn rookie fast bowlers based on one series alone, let alone being handled by an inexperienced skipper.

  • Vinay on June 18, 2010, 10:36 GMT

    What? For decades we heard India does not produce fast bowlers because the tracks are flat. That is why we also have many flat track bullies like Yuvraj, Jaffer & so on who cant perform when the going gets tough or just generally on international tracks.

    But what you are saying makes sense. It swings the whole time. It does not bounce. So India neither has bowlers who can bounce batsmen out nor many batsmen who play the short ball well.

  • ravi on June 18, 2010, 10:03 GMT

    You're displaying a head in the mud attitude mr.chopda! Even if the wickets are seamer friendly, it's the same pitch for all seamers across the country and the figures reflect that they were better than others who played simultaneously (including your delhi mate Ishant Sharma). So, giving chance to madrasis like Vinay and Mithun has you smarting, that is all.

  • bns on June 17, 2010, 13:58 GMT

    This is absurd. Fact remains that there are enough fast bowlers in india. The problem lies with the selection process and that includes picking the right candidates in the series squad and then give them the right opportunities in playing eleven. One series Dhawal kulkarni is picked, second series it is turn of Sudeep Tygai then Mithun and Vinay kumar..so on and so forth..and each of these guys have been dumped without appropriate opportunities. I'm sure ppl have forgotten VRV Singh, Gony et al.. It's the selector who are playing musical chairs with the young fast bowling talents. Irfan Pathan has been reduced to just a name "who used to swing" once for india. Oh ! C'mon..he is a new ball bowler..give him the confidence to lead the attack..i'm sure u won;t feel the need to look at Nehra then. What about Ishant? its again selectors' problem..why include him in T20 squads when u know it's not his style. The debate can go endlessly.

  • Salman on June 17, 2010, 11:59 GMT

    Hi Akash, you were spot on. As a nation, I fail to understand when physically smaller Bangladeshis, Sri Lankans and of course historically the Pakis too seemed to produce fast bowlers at will, why not here? A few months ago, I also heard of a young rookie named Atul Sharma touted as a genuine quick! Is he for real as there's very little info about him or is he just a well spread rumour? I'm not sure much is being done to develop quality quick bowling. Too many are being taught to focus on line & length. Perfect eg. Munaf Patel.

  • Spontaneous on June 17, 2010, 9:05 GMT

    Unbelievable. Pitches in India are seamer friendly!!! But I will take your words till Virats, Rohits and Rainas are tested in seaming conditions.

  • waterbuffalo on June 17, 2010, 8:20 GMT

    I remeber Irfan Pathan getting a hattrick in a test against Pakistan with his first three balls.I saw Kapil Dev live in madras in 83, against the windies, what a magnificent bowler, the problem is, India is a batsman friendly country, so the fast/seam bowlers lose heart, and gain weight and so on, and they bowl within themselves all the time. So they bowl 130 km, and a guy like Aamir bowls 150, he bowls like his life depended on it. Indian pace bowlers bowl to save runs, pakistanis bowl to smash the stumps.

  • Nihit on June 17, 2010, 5:47 GMT

    This is a very nice insight into the Indian fast bowling. But I still can't fathom how the fact that the richest board in the world is unable to do anything.

  • Joy on June 17, 2010, 3:54 GMT

    You are one of the best evaluators of the game. Rest authors article are sugar coated with words intentionally made difficult to prove that they are great writers

  • SuperTechnique on June 17, 2010, 1:36 GMT

    Brilliant Analysis again from Akash.Only if you would have brought forward a solution for the problem.The problem isnt in fast bowlers being the leading wicket takers in domestic cricket.The problem is why are the RPs,Munaf,Ishants and Sreesanth not the leading wicket takers at the domestic level.There clearly is no proper grooming.So proper coach who can tell to these fast bowlers that they arent bowling well enough at the domestic level I think dat needs to be addressed importantly otherwise this problem will continue.Just 2 days ago left armer Jaidev unadkat picked 13 wickets.If this prob isnt solved even he will do down that track again

  • yawn on June 16, 2010, 23:05 GMT

    Indians are too fat and lazy to have proper fast bowlers. Look at other Sport like Football, Rugby & Athletics where are the Indians? Based on that I really don't think Indians can produce good fast bowlers irrelevant of the conditions present at the domestic level.

  • wanderer on June 16, 2010, 19:18 GMT

    We will trade you one of (Sohail Tanvir, Mohammad Sami, Rana Naveed) for one of (Badrinath, Wasim Jaffer, Dinesh Karthik). Bring your boy to the official border near Lahore and we will trade then.

  • dr amol on June 16, 2010, 16:27 GMT

    this is surely true....but the other bitter truth is where is the next quality spinner....bowlers just bowling quick at the batsmans pads cant be called spinners

  • Nish on June 16, 2010, 14:59 GMT

    Sreesanth and Ishant are our current fastest bowlers, both capable of crossing 150 Kmph. Need to bring them back 100% fit, at least for test matches. Maybe they should be sparingly used for T20s and ODIs, or even never used at all.

  • Ayaz Mansuri on June 16, 2010, 13:56 GMT

    Mr. Akash Chopra,

    What are you talking here, 3 Day Match and the bowler is preserving himself for what ??? In a 5 Day match may be bowlers would want to preserve themselves to last the distance.

    You talking about younger Indian Batsmen not being found out at International Level, then how come India is unable to find replacements to the Tendulkars, Sehwags & Dravids (Though he is considered a Test Player he has a better record in one dayers compared to the newer crop of Kohlis, Jadejas, Sharmas etc). Can you explain why India's Batting at the International Level is also deteriorating.

  • emran xaman on June 16, 2010, 9:14 GMT

    I agree with Akash on the point that India beside it flourishing & much celebrated cricketing history always lacked Genuine Fastbowlers.

    For this there are few other reasons as well beside the few mentioned by Akash.

    1. I think that india badly misses a true fast bowling icon whom the youngster fascinates about; as in case of Pakistan that is in contrary to India have produced plethora of fast bowling legends like Fazal Mehmood, Sarfaraz Nawaz, Imran Khan, Wasim Akram, Waqar Younis, Shoaib Akhter etc.

    2. The indians do have a relatively nimble physique that never suits very much to the fast bowling, for being genuinely quick you need it to be in you genes.

    3. For long indian selection for investing their resources on fast bowler never had any appropriate dimension, e.g. Agarkar, Sreesanth, Dinda, Jogit Sharma, Ishant Sharma, Munaf Patel; unfortunately none of them is blessed with the 'brawn' of a hunk.

    4.So I recommend that india should ensue a search in muslim/sikh area

  • Naveed Rasool on June 16, 2010, 8:33 GMT

    I simply cannot understand as to what goes wrong with Indian fast bowlers after they have played international cricket for a year or two; Irfan Phatan, Agit Agrkar, Ishant Sharma, Monaf Patel, Sreesanth, Ashis Nehra and so on, they all started very promisingly and but faded away. There is lack of commitment on the part of the players or absence of good coaches who could take care of quality bowlers and groom them into world class fast bowlers. Look at Pakistan, they always had good young fast bowlers coming up and delivering at international level. I think Indian think tank must find out the real cause and try to preserve and nurture their young fast bowling talent.

  • Swaroop on June 16, 2010, 8:18 GMT

    I'm sorry. I think this argument is circular and self-defeating.

    For years, we complained that there were no sporting pitches and therefore, there were no fast bowlers in India. Now, you argue that there are sporting pitches, and hence no fast bowlers in India.

  • Surath on June 16, 2010, 6:39 GMT

    If you think thisfast bowling is a problem wait when Sehwag(an oddity),Rahul and Sachin retire. We will not have a test caliber batsman. This IPL is killing the Indian cricket, man.

  • monoj on June 16, 2010, 6:38 GMT

    Abu nachim ahmed is one of few guanine fast bowler in india, but he is from forgotten state of North-east.....

  • mohit sharma on June 15, 2010, 19:36 GMT

    where is irfan phatan and r.p. singh? why did bcci not given chance to play in zimbabave tour to them?

  • mohit sharma on June 15, 2010, 19:35 GMT

    where is irfan phatan and r.p. singh? why did bcci not given chance to play in zimbabave tour to them?

  • sagar on June 15, 2010, 17:22 GMT

    I agree with you Akash on all the points you have mentioned. One factor that also explains the demise of genuine quicks is the absence of a bowling coach form the indian team coaching staff. In the history of indian cricket the senior team has only once employed a full time bowling coach (Venkatesh Prasad) who was never a genuine quick himself!!! i think if there is a former genuine quick now coach employed by BCCI to manage the indian fast bowlers at the: NCA, INDIA 'A' level, and also National team will help guide these rare speices in cricket!!!!

  • P Subramani on June 15, 2010, 14:28 GMT

    Akash Chopra's articles are quite analytical. This concern about the inadequacy of our fast bowlers has not come a day late. If one analyses the situation objectively, I find that there is a great incidence of injuries to proming fast bowlers causing them to never really come back fully fit. The other thing I notice is that most of our fast bowlers do not have the weight transfer from the back foot to the delivery stride just prior to the point of delivery that is so noticable in almost all the really fast men like Steyn, Nannes,Johnson and the rest of the pack. I cannot believe that the wrist position can make such a major difference.After all when one talks about a side on action, it is basically the perfect cartwheel that we look for in a bowler. When any bowler does that easy cartwheel with a transfer of body weight as mentioned, I see no reason why we cannot have more than just military medium trundlers. Could Akash give his views on the above observations [lease.

  • kapil agarwal on June 15, 2010, 9:54 GMT

    the biggest problem with indian seam bowling in last 2 years has been that apart from zaheer khan every one seems to dependent on conditions to pick up wickets.fast bowling requires to bend ones back.unfortunately ipl has provided these fast bowlers a cution that even if they dont play for india they will hace enough money in there bags.fast bowling reqires one to work like a dog even if ones phsique is of a fast bowler.fred trueman used to bowl 1000 overs in 1 county session.it is not gym but continuos bowling in the nets that will improve ones bowling.indian fast bowlers are not prepared to work hard.i am soory but that is a fact.look at bollinger and siddle.rookie bowling at 145 kms.and no indian bowler is able to do it consistently.we need to be harsh on our fast bowlers.it is a fact.

  • haris on June 15, 2010, 8:20 GMT

    India needs 100 more years to produce a fast bowler delivering constantly at 145-150 kph. Problem in india is everything is stylized and glamorized. "fast bowlers" in India dont have to work as hard and bust their back sides as fastbowlers in Pakistan or Australia, to get noticed. Any tom dick and harry bolwing 140 kph for 2 months becomes the NEXT STAR and looses focus and comes down to 120.. at lyk 20, 22 years age! which is hot cake for batsmen these days. irfan, sreesanth, ishant, munaf etc are examples of the same pathetic story. If India wants to get some good fast bowlers it keep thier players away from the hands of the media.

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  • haris on June 15, 2010, 8:20 GMT

    India needs 100 more years to produce a fast bowler delivering constantly at 145-150 kph. Problem in india is everything is stylized and glamorized. "fast bowlers" in India dont have to work as hard and bust their back sides as fastbowlers in Pakistan or Australia, to get noticed. Any tom dick and harry bolwing 140 kph for 2 months becomes the NEXT STAR and looses focus and comes down to 120.. at lyk 20, 22 years age! which is hot cake for batsmen these days. irfan, sreesanth, ishant, munaf etc are examples of the same pathetic story. If India wants to get some good fast bowlers it keep thier players away from the hands of the media.

  • kapil agarwal on June 15, 2010, 9:54 GMT

    the biggest problem with indian seam bowling in last 2 years has been that apart from zaheer khan every one seems to dependent on conditions to pick up wickets.fast bowling requires to bend ones back.unfortunately ipl has provided these fast bowlers a cution that even if they dont play for india they will hace enough money in there bags.fast bowling reqires one to work like a dog even if ones phsique is of a fast bowler.fred trueman used to bowl 1000 overs in 1 county session.it is not gym but continuos bowling in the nets that will improve ones bowling.indian fast bowlers are not prepared to work hard.i am soory but that is a fact.look at bollinger and siddle.rookie bowling at 145 kms.and no indian bowler is able to do it consistently.we need to be harsh on our fast bowlers.it is a fact.

  • P Subramani on June 15, 2010, 14:28 GMT

    Akash Chopra's articles are quite analytical. This concern about the inadequacy of our fast bowlers has not come a day late. If one analyses the situation objectively, I find that there is a great incidence of injuries to proming fast bowlers causing them to never really come back fully fit. The other thing I notice is that most of our fast bowlers do not have the weight transfer from the back foot to the delivery stride just prior to the point of delivery that is so noticable in almost all the really fast men like Steyn, Nannes,Johnson and the rest of the pack. I cannot believe that the wrist position can make such a major difference.After all when one talks about a side on action, it is basically the perfect cartwheel that we look for in a bowler. When any bowler does that easy cartwheel with a transfer of body weight as mentioned, I see no reason why we cannot have more than just military medium trundlers. Could Akash give his views on the above observations [lease.

  • sagar on June 15, 2010, 17:22 GMT

    I agree with you Akash on all the points you have mentioned. One factor that also explains the demise of genuine quicks is the absence of a bowling coach form the indian team coaching staff. In the history of indian cricket the senior team has only once employed a full time bowling coach (Venkatesh Prasad) who was never a genuine quick himself!!! i think if there is a former genuine quick now coach employed by BCCI to manage the indian fast bowlers at the: NCA, INDIA 'A' level, and also National team will help guide these rare speices in cricket!!!!

  • mohit sharma on June 15, 2010, 19:35 GMT

    where is irfan phatan and r.p. singh? why did bcci not given chance to play in zimbabave tour to them?

  • mohit sharma on June 15, 2010, 19:36 GMT

    where is irfan phatan and r.p. singh? why did bcci not given chance to play in zimbabave tour to them?

  • monoj on June 16, 2010, 6:38 GMT

    Abu nachim ahmed is one of few guanine fast bowler in india, but he is from forgotten state of North-east.....

  • Surath on June 16, 2010, 6:39 GMT

    If you think thisfast bowling is a problem wait when Sehwag(an oddity),Rahul and Sachin retire. We will not have a test caliber batsman. This IPL is killing the Indian cricket, man.

  • Swaroop on June 16, 2010, 8:18 GMT

    I'm sorry. I think this argument is circular and self-defeating.

    For years, we complained that there were no sporting pitches and therefore, there were no fast bowlers in India. Now, you argue that there are sporting pitches, and hence no fast bowlers in India.

  • Naveed Rasool on June 16, 2010, 8:33 GMT

    I simply cannot understand as to what goes wrong with Indian fast bowlers after they have played international cricket for a year or two; Irfan Phatan, Agit Agrkar, Ishant Sharma, Monaf Patel, Sreesanth, Ashis Nehra and so on, they all started very promisingly and but faded away. There is lack of commitment on the part of the players or absence of good coaches who could take care of quality bowlers and groom them into world class fast bowlers. Look at Pakistan, they always had good young fast bowlers coming up and delivering at international level. I think Indian think tank must find out the real cause and try to preserve and nurture their young fast bowling talent.