Indian cricket August 16, 2010

Why Sehwag isn't so hot in ODIs

Virender Sehwag scores consistently at a rapid pace in Test cricket but hasn't had the same success in ODIs perhaps because he feels the need to accelerate all the time
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Sample this: Lasith Malinga bowls a barrage of well-directed bouncers, Virender Sehwag looks right through and refuses to bite. He either ducks or simply moves away from the line almost every single time. Malinga keeps him quiet for a few deliveries but Viru persists and rejects the temptation to go for the kill, instead waits patiently for the ball to pitch in his area of dominance. And just when the moment arrives, he abandons restrain and flings the ball in style. He does so not because he has played a few dot balls but because the ball ought to be hit and he obliges. That's Virender Sehwag for you in Test cricket.

Change the colour of the ball from red to white, the clothing from white to blue, and Sehwag would not only bite but might also succumb in the process. Viru boasts of scoring a mammoth 7000 runs in both Test and ODI cricket, yet his lack of consistency in the shorter format continues to be a bane. Ironically, though, his batting seems to be tailor-made for the slam-bang shorter format. So, what's the logic behind such patchy performances in ODIs?

Lets first make sense of what makes Viru tick in the longer format, because it is the exact opposite of this that somewhat explains his instability in the shorter formats. Sehwag's game is built around hitting boundaries for he's definitely not one who'd happily rotate strike for a few overs without finding the fence. Regardless of however defensive the fielding captain is, it's imperative to start with attacking field positions which means all bad balls and good shots reach the fence. Contrary to the popular belief that Sehwag follows the simple formula of seeing-and-hitting, in Test cricket, he not only has a specific plan but also the discipline to follow it to the T.

Delhi had lost an early wicket in an inconsequential Ranji trophy game against minnows Orissa. The track was wet and had plenty in it for the quick bowlers. In came Viru, he danced down the track and played a wild slog, missing the ball by a mile. I, at the other end, went down to reason it out with him. To my utter disbelief he said he'd missed the ball on purpose because the chances of connecting cleanly were minimal. Instead, he wanted the bowler to pitch it short the following delivery. The bowler fell for it, obliged and Viru smashed him for four. That incident, followed by quite a few like it, gave me an insight into Viru's mind. After all, he doesn't keep it as simple as it looks, at least not at the planning level.

But an inverse logic is brought into action every time Sehwag goes for an outing in the shorter format. He doesn't have the same planning in place or the patience to follow it, for he believes that it's almost mandatory to up the ante all the time. Even if he's already hit two fours in an over, he believes he must go for the third one. His success in Test cricket lies in choosing the right balls to hit, and not in hitting every single ball, which he tries to do in an ODI. He plays shots like the pull and hook, which don't come naturally to him. He would take the aerial route not because it was the need of the hour but because that's what you must do in shorter formats, or so he feels. Little does he realise that if you're already driving at 150kmph, there's only so much faster you can go and be safe. If you're driving in the fifth gear, you must be ready to apply the brakes. And regardless of the format, Sehwag always bats in the fifth gear with the only option of slowing down available to him.

The shots which find the boundary ropes in Test cricket don't reach the fence in the shorter format due to defensive field placements and that, perhaps, forces him to raise the bar even further. Whatever the reason for his not climbing the summit in the shorter formats, he must find a way out of it. For the average of less than 34 in ODIs doesn't do justice to the talent this man possesses.

Former India opener Aakash Chopra is the author of Out of the Blue, an account of Rajasthan's 2010-11 Ranji Trophy victory. His website is here and his Twitter feed here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • kashif on October 19, 2010, 14:55 GMT

    xlnt analysis AKASH ....

  • fred on September 5, 2010, 11:53 GMT

    what a cute article it is. me much agreed wid it. but as suraj has commented was too fantastic. sehwag is the same person what he has described....

  • suraj bashyal on September 3, 2010, 12:54 GMT

    the article is rit. anyway east or west sehwag is the best. he is the only player who can upcome wid tendulkar's 200* in odi n lara's 400* in tests n even in t20s. only viru can do that.

  • Saju Mathew on August 31, 2010, 9:51 GMT

    Hi Akash. I think it wouldn't be fair to take on or disect Sehwag after this tour. He is the only one who played consistently and gives India the boost we require. Viru's style is such. I Remember him saying he could get out on any ball; so hitting it is the best option. Let us not change his style but think about what happened to the rest of our players. Let us leave the poor viru alone. Our batsmen (no more a secret) are poor against quality pace (with an exception of may be Sachin). What have we done to strengthen that? I remember a comment made by Mohd. Azharuddin a long time back on Sachin's attitude. Sachin identifies his weakness and converts them into his strengths through sheer persistence and hard work. Azhar said he remembers hearing Sachin practicing shots (with the bowling machine) after all have returned to bed after a hard day's match or practice session.

  • Naman on August 31, 2010, 6:32 GMT

    well said george, as an opener, all viru needs to do is score quick runs to lay the platform for the rest of the order to capatalise. Anyway, if you consider his strike rate, then his average isn't so bad.

  • ramlakhan on August 30, 2010, 18:58 GMT

    hi akash! sehwag is a very dangerous in both 4 apposition.

  • Romit on August 26, 2010, 18:02 GMT

    Have you heard ne one day agressive opener having a strikerate of more than 35 ,jaysuria,gilchrist,gayle,every1 averages like sehwag

  • Gourav kataria on August 26, 2010, 7:50 GMT

    Hey aakash i m totally agree with u tha sehwag is nt that gud in short form of the game becoz of tight field is set in the short format games.. N while sehwag is hitting he just smashed that ball dnt know frm where it goes thats why in ODI's he founds the fielder all around but we cnt see such a things in test cricket... M i right mr aakash?

  • George on August 25, 2010, 3:12 GMT

    I disagree with your comments. You don't need to have a average of 40 or 50 in ODI. You need quick runs to be a match winner. Scoring quick runs will set the trend for the batting to follow. For chasing, that will reduce the RRR considerably. He flips the table around in a short time with his risk taking ability. So you can't expect him to shine in every match. Viru is a star.. and he will still be a nightmare for the bowlers.

  • Anonymous on August 22, 2010, 11:07 GMT

    Really enjoyed the insights into a mind like Sehwag's. An interesting thing I noticed just now while following the India/Sri Lanka game,

    Sehwag Test Avg 54.14 ODI Avg 34.42 Sangakkara Test Avg 56.85 ODI Avg 36.63 Mahela Test Avg 54.06 ODI Avg 32.71

    Three great batsmen with different styles but a similar pattern in their Test and ODI averages.

  • kashif on October 19, 2010, 14:55 GMT

    xlnt analysis AKASH ....

  • fred on September 5, 2010, 11:53 GMT

    what a cute article it is. me much agreed wid it. but as suraj has commented was too fantastic. sehwag is the same person what he has described....

  • suraj bashyal on September 3, 2010, 12:54 GMT

    the article is rit. anyway east or west sehwag is the best. he is the only player who can upcome wid tendulkar's 200* in odi n lara's 400* in tests n even in t20s. only viru can do that.

  • Saju Mathew on August 31, 2010, 9:51 GMT

    Hi Akash. I think it wouldn't be fair to take on or disect Sehwag after this tour. He is the only one who played consistently and gives India the boost we require. Viru's style is such. I Remember him saying he could get out on any ball; so hitting it is the best option. Let us not change his style but think about what happened to the rest of our players. Let us leave the poor viru alone. Our batsmen (no more a secret) are poor against quality pace (with an exception of may be Sachin). What have we done to strengthen that? I remember a comment made by Mohd. Azharuddin a long time back on Sachin's attitude. Sachin identifies his weakness and converts them into his strengths through sheer persistence and hard work. Azhar said he remembers hearing Sachin practicing shots (with the bowling machine) after all have returned to bed after a hard day's match or practice session.

  • Naman on August 31, 2010, 6:32 GMT

    well said george, as an opener, all viru needs to do is score quick runs to lay the platform for the rest of the order to capatalise. Anyway, if you consider his strike rate, then his average isn't so bad.

  • ramlakhan on August 30, 2010, 18:58 GMT

    hi akash! sehwag is a very dangerous in both 4 apposition.

  • Romit on August 26, 2010, 18:02 GMT

    Have you heard ne one day agressive opener having a strikerate of more than 35 ,jaysuria,gilchrist,gayle,every1 averages like sehwag

  • Gourav kataria on August 26, 2010, 7:50 GMT

    Hey aakash i m totally agree with u tha sehwag is nt that gud in short form of the game becoz of tight field is set in the short format games.. N while sehwag is hitting he just smashed that ball dnt know frm where it goes thats why in ODI's he founds the fielder all around but we cnt see such a things in test cricket... M i right mr aakash?

  • George on August 25, 2010, 3:12 GMT

    I disagree with your comments. You don't need to have a average of 40 or 50 in ODI. You need quick runs to be a match winner. Scoring quick runs will set the trend for the batting to follow. For chasing, that will reduce the RRR considerably. He flips the table around in a short time with his risk taking ability. So you can't expect him to shine in every match. Viru is a star.. and he will still be a nightmare for the bowlers.

  • Anonymous on August 22, 2010, 11:07 GMT

    Really enjoyed the insights into a mind like Sehwag's. An interesting thing I noticed just now while following the India/Sri Lanka game,

    Sehwag Test Avg 54.14 ODI Avg 34.42 Sangakkara Test Avg 56.85 ODI Avg 36.63 Mahela Test Avg 54.06 ODI Avg 32.71

    Three great batsmen with different styles but a similar pattern in their Test and ODI averages.

  • arps on August 22, 2010, 10:28 GMT

    It's ok wid sehwag, but wat about the others such as dinesh karthik, rohit sharma, harbhajan singh. karthik does'nt have the talent to survive and rohit - harbhajan alwayz struglling for form, is this the team for world cup? bring back robin uthappa, irfan pathan, yousuf pathan, shreesanth and atleast give a chance to players like saurabh tiwari, ashwin and amit mishra if you have got them in your team. So,if this is the preparartion for the world cup then "God Save India"!!!

  • AN on August 21, 2010, 18:11 GMT

    Manish (above) is on the money. In his early years, Sehwag had not mentally and strategically adjusted his game for the shorter format(s). Since 2008 he has corrected that and looks very dangerous from an opposition perspective. This was the reason he was "Wisden Cricketer of the Year" two years in a row. All formats were weighted for that award. During "No ball-gate" you could clearly see that he had gotten under the bowlers skin as Ian Chappell said. Truly a once in a life time cricketer. Even Sobers said recently that he would (paraphrasing) pay top money to see him bat. People like him have made Test cricket worth watching. In Pakistan, there is this new bloke Amir who makes for good watching from a bowling perspective. Test cricket may yet survive...

  • Aniket on August 21, 2010, 14:28 GMT

    I agree with this post... The tendency to hit the balls remain the same with Viru.. but since the game finishes fast, he has to go after the ball everytime, he can't wait for bad balls to come.. n gives away his wicket.. that makes his average less than in Tests... where he has ample time to get runs into his bag... Good Going Sehwag ! We need more from you in ODI's.

  • Ashraful(Junti) on August 21, 2010, 8:23 GMT

    Sehwag is India's no 1 match winner.I think he will not change his batting style in all format.

  • AHMAD on August 20, 2010, 17:45 GMT

    Negative field placements in ODI's is the reson for this becaus e it is extremely hard to score in negative field placements.................perfectly timed shots give you nothing.

    Negative field placements starve you of runs and eventually you get frustrated and give away your wicket while trying to hit the ball too hard as a consequence of frustration ......same happens to Sehwag, Sanga and Jayawardene......

  • Anonymous on August 20, 2010, 17:41 GMT

    The only reson is that actually ODI's are way too difficult than tests because the field placements are negative ....because of these negative field placings it is virtually impossible to find gaps. These negative field placements in ODi's starve batsmen of runs. When your perfectly hit shots bring you nothing because of these negative field placements batsman is frustrated and tries to hit the ball hard rather than time it ..........that is what brings his demise.....same happens to Sehwag and same happens to Sanga and Jayawardende................but Sachin is a real genius who has ability to formulate an antidote against any opposition's strategy in any format of game.

  • Anthony on August 19, 2010, 10:08 GMT

    Sehwag is at his best when he fires and does not have to alter his game..only thing what he needs to do is be watchful. The shorter the format the sharper and brainier Sehwag needs to be. Pace his matches(50/20)patiently and rotate the strike often for him to allow and be thoughtful in the process.

  • Rohit on August 18, 2010, 4:42 GMT

    I would really like to appreciate your insightful writing. These articles are interesting to read.

    I think there are few other factors which might justify the 34-54 difference like.. - When he made Test debut, he was already comfortable at International level. Thus less initial hick-ups and Ganguly, the then captain of India had already shown lot of trust in him. - Such high strike rate and aggressive style as a test opener was an unconquered territory and Sehwag is enjoying being a path setter. - Also in Test even if you bowl first, you are not chasing total in the first team inning. I think, this reduces some pressure off an opener and supports his style of batting. If you see his second inning average.. it is merely 30 odd.

    Having said all this, even I believe Sehwag really has talent to take his ODI avg close to 50. Also we should not be surprised if opposite test captain spreads field for him in the first over itself.

  • DesiHungama on August 18, 2010, 3:46 GMT

    Sehwag is the best and the boldest player India has ever produced. I admire his batting and truly wish if he was on the other side of the border. Fan from Pak.

  • Anonymous on August 18, 2010, 3:38 GMT

    asesome.. very true.. viru should do well in shorter format too...

  • Anonymous on August 18, 2010, 1:57 GMT

    Very well said about viru

  • Manish on August 17, 2010, 22:51 GMT

    I disagree. Sehwag's inexperience in his earlier years has been the reason for his low average. For the last few years, he's been an absolute hero. If you look at his last 50 ODI games his average is over 44 with a strike rate over 121. If you look at his record since the start of 2008 his average is over 45 at S/R 123. If you look at his record since mid 2008 his average is 50 at a rate of over 126 runs per 100balls. His career strike rate is still now over 100! I don't think we can complain now. Blame it on worse batting pitches or better bowling attacks a few years back, but dont blame it on Viru! He has blossomed into the greatest cricketer in both formats over the last 2 and a half years and the stats are there to prove it!

  • Raj Skandaraj on August 17, 2010, 21:27 GMT

    Shewag is a natural entertaining batsman who loves hitting boundaries and sixes. His shot selection is superb but must accept that opposition teams will try their utmost to slow him down and frustrate him so that he will play a false shot. He cannot have it both ways - ie enjoy hitting good balls to the fence to put the bowler off but complain when his strategy fails when the bowler tries to put him off......

  • Anonymous on August 17, 2010, 18:42 GMT

    i do agree with aakash.i think viru should play should play less aggressively like tendulkar, and when he is in 40's and 90's on scoreboard he should play for himself like tendulkar irrespective of the match situation, only then he can make centuries like master and be called the worlds best batsmen in any format.afterall the people r going to remember the 100's but not quick 70,80 or 90

  • Scientist S.R. Shankar on August 17, 2010, 14:34 GMT

    Dear Akash Probably this is the first time I differ from your observations which are invariably marked by great insight& technical knowledge Your analysis at places suggests that Sewag does not plan his ODI innings as in tests He has done on many occasions in past and there cannot be a better illustration than the innings of 99* he played against Srilanka yesterday.He judiciously waited till swing subsided and the juice in the pitch dried upHe planned initially consolidation to pull the team out of woods Later he let loose his characterstic onslaught to essay a marvel of ODI innings This is is not as easy as the viewers think He has sharp eyes& fine judgement of swing & spin alike He has terrific balance on the backfoot to launch a variety of strokes-As a cricketer you would appreciate that these are not possible if not coupled with sound defence He scores a quick fire 30/40 mostly in ODI-He is certainly in top3 batsmen in world in ANY FORM AND importantly INSTILS FEAR in opposition

  • Rahul Singh on August 17, 2010, 13:28 GMT

    Agreed to the last bit of it.. One of the reasons I think Sehwag is impatient while batting in ODIs is India's relatively weaker bowling attack. No target seems unachievable for a strong batting opposition [The logic does not apply while batting second though :) ].

    I would like to add, having seen his international career, Sehwag is a brilliant learner when it comes to cricket. He learns where he believes he needs to learn and dismisses whatever he does not believe in (for example textbook footwork), that is the brilliance since he applies himself while learning. I am sure he will learn to be patient in ODIs in time. If he tries and targets to bat 50 overs, he could easily become number 1 limited overs batsman in the world.

  • Anonymous on August 17, 2010, 12:43 GMT

    Great article.. Seems Sehwag took some learning to yesterday's knock.

  • Nandkishore on August 17, 2010, 6:23 GMT

    I think thats the best analysis done by anyone for sehwag and Akash being a old friend must talk to sehwag and Gary and convey his analysis. India won't mind cruising at 5-6 RPO in initial overs if Sehwag stays for 30-40 overs and wins the matches like he did in yesterday's match. He should understand whatever format of cricket Runs are always more important than strike rate, Afridi and Yusuf Pathan are ideal example of failures.

  • Sundararaman,D on August 17, 2010, 5:13 GMT

    You are correct All great Batsman make bowlers bowl to their strength zones by using the length and breadth of crease. palyers like Hayden, Ghambir and nowadays Dinesh Kartik walk down the pitch to make bowlers alter their length to suit their stroke production. Sure Schwag realises this and wish him all the best to be more consistant and join the likes of Sachin to win 2011 world cup

  • Soham on August 17, 2010, 4:07 GMT

    Very well explained Aakash. I have been thinking why this vast different in his Test and ODI average and I have something in mind like his batting style but couldn't explain to myself or anyone but you have dissected it perfectly.. And nevertheless great article..

    Soham

  • Sushmit Mazumdar on August 17, 2010, 0:13 GMT

    Great article Akash! I was a big fan of your batting , and I am a fan of your writing as well. I am a big Sehwag fan, and always believed that there was more to his batting than met the eye. It is his keen sense of occasion, shrewd and unconventional planning, combined with his uncanny ability to focus on every ball as a fresh challenge, without dwelling on what went before, that makes him one of the all-time greats of Indian test cricket. With his great bat speed and razor-sharp reflexes, he is a formidable force. However, why he does not apply the same thinking to his one-day innings is utterly inexplicable, and at times, frustrating. He has, of late, played some restrained innings(like the one today), and this has paid him dividends. Perhaps his captain and coach should sit down with him and remind him that he is the premier batsman in the team at this time, and does not need to do anything different in one-dayers. If he stays long enough, we are assured a big score.

  • Mahesh on August 16, 2010, 23:30 GMT

    I dont believe in your analysis that it is just a logic that he is missing. It is more than that. Just slowing down will not do.

    Despite setting one-day field settings in a test match (by Sanga in recent test series with SL), he still managed to score well. How would you explain that?

    It is something more deeper and am sure definitely it will be the first item on Gary Kristen's Project Plan. If he can make Sehwag replicate his success in One days, it will be a proud achievement on his resume

  • Craig M on August 16, 2010, 22:57 GMT

    I particularly enjoyed the part where Sehwag said he missed it on purpose. I am a firm believer that Sehwag has a much more wily cricketing brain than he is given credit for.

  • Amit on August 16, 2010, 22:31 GMT

    Sehwag might want to try what Tendulkar does. Just plan on play through 50 overs. I dont rememmer once Sehwag has managed to do that and yet, he has played through 90 overs in a days more than twice. The last few times Tendulkar has played through the innings, he's reached close to a double century several times and a 200 once. Sehwag could be equally effective.

  • S on August 16, 2010, 18:24 GMT

    Very true this. And thanks for the little inside scop into his mind, afterall, looking at him, very few would think underlying his simple & instinctive looking batting, that he has such a sharp & cunning mind with his own unique methodology. I hope he learns to use his breaks in the ODIs & T20s, as he did today, & come out as an even better batsman in the shorter formats.

  • Anonymous on August 16, 2010, 16:21 GMT

    An excellent insight into Sehwag's batting style. Maybe the outlook of playing a big innings (like today) would just be the right way for him to go about (which he can pick up from Sachin)

  • Giri Pathmanaban on August 16, 2010, 15:58 GMT

    Akash--you are a tremendous cricket writer, in every sense. First, the insight that you have, having played cricket at the highest level, including against Australia, in Australia (as an aside, I always thought that your contribution with those opening partnerships on that tour was seriously undervalued) is tremendous, something that us armchair critics can never get. Second, your writing skills are quite superb: you seem to always find the right words to convey exactly what you need to convey, and do it in as simple language as possible. I am not sure if you are still playing these days, but it seems to me that you have a brilliant career as a cricket journalist awaiting you...

  • Biswanath on August 16, 2010, 15:56 GMT

    Hi Aakash,

    I agree with your thoughts, but if we go little further into T20, then it dips down further. Might be more pressure to hit the ball.

  • Nick D.C. on August 16, 2010, 15:22 GMT

    Good Analysis.

  • Shredster on August 16, 2010, 14:41 GMT

    Excellent article, Aakash.

  • Binoj Peter on August 16, 2010, 14:35 GMT

    This is one thing that has always puzzled me. Sehwag scores heavily at One-Day strike rate in Tests but when it comes to One-Dayers, he cannot do that in same consistency as in Tests.

  • Prashant Kondi on August 16, 2010, 14:09 GMT

    AC completely agree with u.. n these were my exact thots on why this guy isnt gettin those big scores in ODIs. his belief in his own capabilities and the onus tht he is puttin on himslf to put the match beyond the opposition with every ball is what is different from his mindset in the tests.. it is almost selfless self-destruction.

  • Kumar Gaurav on August 16, 2010, 14:02 GMT

    Hi aakash u r right, sehwag is very special talent. But in compare odis to test cricket he is not able to pile high scores. His average is little 38 in odis as compare to test cricket which is 54. Another reason for his low scores in odis is that he donot stay on the crease for long time.

  • Tushar on August 16, 2010, 13:12 GMT

    Loverly..... I dont think I have ever read a better article dissecting Sehwag's performance in ODIs.

  • andala on August 16, 2010, 10:23 GMT

    he is the best player and he is unable to play in shorter versions because he plans to hit the ball hard but he is sumtimes unlucky cause the ball finds the fielder and while in test cricket he still hits the ball hard but the field is defensive so he is saved

  • Mehak on August 16, 2010, 9:16 GMT

    You really are the insider Aakash, always a pleasure to read your articles

  • Rohit on August 16, 2010, 9:05 GMT

    I think india should again think about Rohit sharma & dinesh karthik.Because these are getting chance regularly.what about others.Talen is nothing but just a god gift you have to work hard to give 100% contribution towards the team target.These two are doing nothing just blocking chance of other player. Now it is enough to give them chance.Try to use Sourab tiwary,Pujara.

    Why people are saying young should get chance more.why is it the parameter to get sucess.No never ever.See Dravid ,Laxman,They are still working hard & getting to give 100%.

  • Irfan Baig on August 16, 2010, 8:33 GMT

    Despite being a Pakistani, honest opinion is, he is a match winner. As far as you play match winning knocks mostly when you play rather than making an average 50 in 60 balls and at the end the team loses, I think it's ok.

  • Navin on August 16, 2010, 7:34 GMT

    Finally someone comes out with this. It really amazes me to see how brilliant a player he is in Test and not so in ODI's. Look at his strike rate in Test is almost 82, most players now would love their ODI to be like his test. In ODI's his strike rate is just over 103 and 153 on T20I, amazing player he is.

    But the following stats tells his ODI story: He has been dismissed for 25 or less in 111 innings, that is more than half of his career innings (218). In this 111 innings he averages only 9.52 with a strike rate of 73.19 along with 11 ducks. So I think you all know now where he has to improve on.

  • Jacoby on August 16, 2010, 7:20 GMT

    I cant think of a batsman thats scored over 7000 runs that averages more in ODI's then tests, SEHWAG a star in both formats

  • goblin on August 16, 2010, 6:16 GMT

    i dont agree with article posted. sehwag is a god gifted player .he has natural killing instincts in him.and thats what the bowlers most fear about him.its his initial boundaries that distorts the line & length of even most disciplined bowlers.so dont worry with his av in odi . just enjoy bowlers geting smashed whenever he does it

  • Kalyan on August 16, 2010, 5:59 GMT

    Akash Chopra is right. John Wright has repeatedly told Sehwag to forget everything else and simply focus on playing out 50 overs in the ODIs. He knows that the runs will come. There is always the batting powerplay to exploit later on. The innings by Tendulkar where he scored 200 is a must watch for Sehwag.

  • Rahul on August 16, 2010, 5:55 GMT

    Sehwag can pick this strategy from his idol Sachin Tendulkar who has mastered the art of excelling in both format of the game. In one dayers as well, Sachin is cautious and wait for his time. Meanwhile he keeps taking singles and doubles by right placement. His strategy is also to never keep it quiet and he makes loads of runs with equally/similarly high strike rate. Though Sachin in Test cricket is way very cautious while batting.

  • Asim Gupta on August 16, 2010, 5:29 GMT

    Hi Akash I think you really summed up the feeling that the fans have about Viru in ODI. I think you have spelt out the exact reason. I am amazed by what Viru did in the Ranji Trphy game. Only he has the guts to carry out a plan like that.

  • Henry on August 16, 2010, 3:37 GMT

    I have often suspected that pacing issues was the cause of sehwag's failures in one dayers, compared to his success in tests. In this respect he reminds me of Kevin Pietersen who until recently failed to adapt well to t20 and michael slater another destructive test opener who unable to construct similar one day innings

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  • Henry on August 16, 2010, 3:37 GMT

    I have often suspected that pacing issues was the cause of sehwag's failures in one dayers, compared to his success in tests. In this respect he reminds me of Kevin Pietersen who until recently failed to adapt well to t20 and michael slater another destructive test opener who unable to construct similar one day innings

  • Asim Gupta on August 16, 2010, 5:29 GMT

    Hi Akash I think you really summed up the feeling that the fans have about Viru in ODI. I think you have spelt out the exact reason. I am amazed by what Viru did in the Ranji Trphy game. Only he has the guts to carry out a plan like that.

  • Rahul on August 16, 2010, 5:55 GMT

    Sehwag can pick this strategy from his idol Sachin Tendulkar who has mastered the art of excelling in both format of the game. In one dayers as well, Sachin is cautious and wait for his time. Meanwhile he keeps taking singles and doubles by right placement. His strategy is also to never keep it quiet and he makes loads of runs with equally/similarly high strike rate. Though Sachin in Test cricket is way very cautious while batting.

  • Kalyan on August 16, 2010, 5:59 GMT

    Akash Chopra is right. John Wright has repeatedly told Sehwag to forget everything else and simply focus on playing out 50 overs in the ODIs. He knows that the runs will come. There is always the batting powerplay to exploit later on. The innings by Tendulkar where he scored 200 is a must watch for Sehwag.

  • goblin on August 16, 2010, 6:16 GMT

    i dont agree with article posted. sehwag is a god gifted player .he has natural killing instincts in him.and thats what the bowlers most fear about him.its his initial boundaries that distorts the line & length of even most disciplined bowlers.so dont worry with his av in odi . just enjoy bowlers geting smashed whenever he does it

  • Jacoby on August 16, 2010, 7:20 GMT

    I cant think of a batsman thats scored over 7000 runs that averages more in ODI's then tests, SEHWAG a star in both formats

  • Navin on August 16, 2010, 7:34 GMT

    Finally someone comes out with this. It really amazes me to see how brilliant a player he is in Test and not so in ODI's. Look at his strike rate in Test is almost 82, most players now would love their ODI to be like his test. In ODI's his strike rate is just over 103 and 153 on T20I, amazing player he is.

    But the following stats tells his ODI story: He has been dismissed for 25 or less in 111 innings, that is more than half of his career innings (218). In this 111 innings he averages only 9.52 with a strike rate of 73.19 along with 11 ducks. So I think you all know now where he has to improve on.

  • Irfan Baig on August 16, 2010, 8:33 GMT

    Despite being a Pakistani, honest opinion is, he is a match winner. As far as you play match winning knocks mostly when you play rather than making an average 50 in 60 balls and at the end the team loses, I think it's ok.

  • Rohit on August 16, 2010, 9:05 GMT

    I think india should again think about Rohit sharma & dinesh karthik.Because these are getting chance regularly.what about others.Talen is nothing but just a god gift you have to work hard to give 100% contribution towards the team target.These two are doing nothing just blocking chance of other player. Now it is enough to give them chance.Try to use Sourab tiwary,Pujara.

    Why people are saying young should get chance more.why is it the parameter to get sucess.No never ever.See Dravid ,Laxman,They are still working hard & getting to give 100%.

  • Mehak on August 16, 2010, 9:16 GMT

    You really are the insider Aakash, always a pleasure to read your articles