Indian cricket February 22, 2013

The Sachin Tendulkar Experience

Kali Kishore
Was it visual? A shotmaking feast of such delicious complexity, that one could often taste it in layers? Was it vicarious? The lower middle-class, living its most vivid world-beating fantasies through an aberration within their ilk
35

I've often wondered what the Sachin Tendulkar experience was? Was it visual? A shotmaking feast of such delicious complexity, that one could often taste it in layers? Was it vicarious? The lower middle-class, living its most vivid world-beating fantasies through an aberration within their ilk. Was it a lesson in values and a personal work-ethic? The need to remain rooted to your nature, and never allowing your desire and focus to dip. Was it, dare I say, an advertisement for the pedants? Strike-rate falling as the hundred neared, the obsession with the weight of the bat, the irritation with the slightest movement of the sight-screen.

The Sachin Tendulkar experience may not be of a singular nature, but it does exist as a collective summation, having a nature completely of its own in the Indian cricket lover's consciousness. Breathing collectively when he walked out, squealing at the straight drive, laughing at his commercials, using his innings as milestones and checkpoints in life (Where were you when Desert Storm happened?), and clinging on to hope when he was batting.

This is, the quintessential, wholesome Tendulkar experience. I wasn't satisfied with it, however. Call it the unsatisfactory feeling of being part of a crowd, or the refusal to accept that the whole is indeed greater than the sum of the parts.

A huge reason as to why I'm demanding a unique Sachin experience for myself, is because I grew up a stone's throw away from the MIG cricket club and Sahitya Sahawas, the colony in Bandra East that housed among other poets and authors, Ramesh Tendulkar. If I may be permitted to be foolish enough to cite proximity as a valid reason to count my Sachin experience as unique, I shall proceed.

As a kid, I used to play cricket at MIG, and in and around Bandra East for almost the whole of the year, except during the monsoons. As a seven-year-old, I once noticed amidst the Chetaks and Vespas that were parked in one of the building compounds, a black BMW. I stupidly asked who it belonged to, and with a thwack on my head, I was told that it was 'Sachin ka, aur kiska' (It is Sachin's, who else?).

Trips to that side of MIG colony became more and more fascinating, because we hoped we'd get to see a silhouette in the window, or get an impromptu batting lesson, who knows? Especially when the Opel Astra from Desert Storm showed up, and we tried to observe from a distance all the dents and bumps from the jumping cricketers in Sharjah. Trying our best to figure out who dented what.

A while later, it was all over the papers that he had bought a Ferrari, but it wasn't parked in Sahitya Sahawas. Reet, whose father worked in customs, claimed to know of its whereabouts, and boasted that Sachin had even taken him for a drive. It became sort of an urban legend in Bombay after that, Sachin's Red Ferrari, and I would pester my father for late-night rides on Marine Drive in the hope of catching a glimpse.

It was then that I nurtured my first wish of actually meeting the man in flesh and blood, and not just in a flash of red. It was ironic, therefore, that when my wish was actually granted, he was in red racing overalls, tearing up a go-karting track. It was 2003, and we had moved to Chennai. MRF was hosting a go-karting competition, and had called in Sachin, Steve Waugh and Brian Lara to kick it off.

My father was good friends with TA Sekhar, who oversees the MRF Pace Foundation, and got us tickets for the event. At the end of it all, we were taken to the back of the room where the press conference was being held. Steve Waugh came out first, and dismissed us with a "Fast, guys" as the photographer fumbled with the camera. Lara was next. He kept staring at a photograph of Sachin and himself that I had given him to sign. He was taller than I thought he'd be.

Then he entered. I noticed the face first. We get so used to seeing the cheery or poker-faced Tendulkar behind shades, that we don't often factor in the fatigue he experiences. It was written all over his cheekbones. The collective demands of the nation had manifested themselves as mere hollows in his cheeks. That impressed me thoroughly.

Later, we moved to Hyderabad. I was in university in America, when Sachin launched into the Australian attack at Uppal, and my brother was triumphantly texting me from the stadium. It was then that I felt the entire weight of the Sachin Tendulkar experience. There was the breathtaking batting, the overdependence on it, and the eventual collapse after his wicket.

But above all, there was the jealousy towards the sibling. Jealousy because he was witnessing something that I wasn't, and something that I would appreciate in far greater measure. The same jealousy that I felt in Chennai, when the sibling's cheeks were patted and pulled, and mine were ignored, although I had seen the world in Sachin's cheeks. The same jealousy that I felt when the sibling was bought Castle Grayskull in a jiffy, because he was younger, whereas I had to beg and plead for a single He-Man toy.

Then there was the hunting for the fake MRF sticker to stick on the bat, and the reliving of Chennai, Sharjah, Nottingham and Cape Town in the colony parking decks, and then remembering these names for the Geography exam. There were the family ice cream night-outs to Marine Drive, where eager eyes would look out for a red Ferrari, but would wander towards a bus stand with an Aladdin poster that was there for the longest time, replaying the entire movie with all the songs in my head, while the ice-cream melted insignificantly.

My Sachin Tendulkar experience, I then realised, was the experience of my childhood. It is therefore, naturally different from the others, immensely special and the parts themselves, forget their sum, are certainly greater than the whole. It's no fault of mine that I straddle between my life and his career. They are, but contiguous entities.

Sachin himself has straddled between the image of the cherubic sixteen-year-old, and that of the elder statesman. It's no fault of mine that I hold on dearly to my childhood. It was, but the happiest time of my life. It is, perhaps, no fault of mine that I see his retirement, (or at least the partial announcement of it) as the complete emergence of the elder statesman. I could be wrong here, and I hope to God that I am, but I think it's time to finally grow up.

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  • Ankita Mehrotra on February 25, 2013, 4:43 GMT

    I absolutely love the descriptions and the 'feel' this article generates! Really well written!

  • Neelam Sudhir on February 24, 2013, 3:31 GMT

    Very nicely written personal experience!!! I cannot imagine cricket without Sachin. I grew up watching Sunil Gavaskar, Kapil Dev and Ravi Shastri and I moved to Canada in 1987. Sunil Gavaskar came to Canada for a Fund Raising cricket game at York University. I was very fortunate to visit him and have pictures with him and got his autograph. I am, hoping to meet my Cricket God Sachin Tendulkar in Canada ( before or after his retirement does not matter to me). God bless him with lots of more strength to continue playing and saving Indian team!!!

  • sudhir nautiyal on February 24, 2013, 2:53 GMT

    wonderful piece.sachin has remained sachin all through these 23 years, he will not grow up, be sure.many will stop watchin cricket once sacnin is not there. he is a role model. but unfortunately nobody in indian cricket seems actually trying to follow him.they are more interested in modelling. t-20 has killed cricket.t-20 should not be called cricket.

  • Nav on February 24, 2013, 2:38 GMT

    Amazing player. Is Kohli the only replacement for him when he eventually retires?

    Feel free to visit my ipad tutorial website if you have time!

  • Neeraj Nayan on February 24, 2013, 2:13 GMT

    Wonderful piece, seemed like I was reliving my very early days with fond images of Sachin, and all his innings flashed through my head providing sheer pleasure for they have always been such a delight. He happens to be the lone entity who has had such a grip on time that all these years seemed still despite many proofs that it's not so. Would love to see him continue for few more years. His imprints will remain indelible for aeons not just as a cricketer but as a perfect role model that will inspire many more generations!!

  • bon on February 24, 2013, 1:49 GMT

    "It’s no fault of mine that I straddle between my life and his career. They are, but contiguous entities. " -- its a masterpiece..never commented on any article before but this was too good to resist.. I know I will write abt him when this guy retires and it will be very close to what you just wrote..one of the best articles abt HIM..ever.

  • gourave bagai on February 23, 2013, 21:53 GMT

    Dear Mr. Tendulkar,

    I am one of the millions whom you have graced when we have been wasted and wounded, dejected and rejected ,shackled and drawn; When we have felt , lost and low ,had our faith shaken

    but never hopeless-

    for there was always a Tendulkar innings;

    We need your heart,; We have felt weak, but never forsaken

    -for there was always a tendulkar innings.

    Looking for a road map,which will let us believe, in belief,

    Trudging through the dark in a world gone awry., holding steadfast in personal tragedies.

    For there was always a tendulakr innings

    When we have stood like a greek amongst his ruins, nothing look forward to with hope, nothing to look backward to with pride

    , mr tendulkar you have said, it will be all right-

    For there was always a tendulkar innings

    We have stood thru the drought, we have stood the flood, Wherever the road of good intentions has gone dry as a bone, You have made us feel, the world’s gonna change,- everything will be all right.

  • moinak on February 23, 2013, 20:02 GMT

    What a wonderful note !

  • Giri on February 23, 2013, 19:18 GMT

    I was there for that 175 against Australia at Hyderabad ..... a day of extreme highs and Lows ....

  • durgesh ballabh on February 23, 2013, 18:54 GMT

    united state is non cricket playing nation still the president of the nation once had a very special(in many ways) comment on the sachin tendulkar he said "i dont know about cricket but still i watch cricket to see sachin playing....not because i love his play its because to know the reason why my country's production goes down by 5% when he is batting

  • Ankita Mehrotra on February 25, 2013, 4:43 GMT

    I absolutely love the descriptions and the 'feel' this article generates! Really well written!

  • Neelam Sudhir on February 24, 2013, 3:31 GMT

    Very nicely written personal experience!!! I cannot imagine cricket without Sachin. I grew up watching Sunil Gavaskar, Kapil Dev and Ravi Shastri and I moved to Canada in 1987. Sunil Gavaskar came to Canada for a Fund Raising cricket game at York University. I was very fortunate to visit him and have pictures with him and got his autograph. I am, hoping to meet my Cricket God Sachin Tendulkar in Canada ( before or after his retirement does not matter to me). God bless him with lots of more strength to continue playing and saving Indian team!!!

  • sudhir nautiyal on February 24, 2013, 2:53 GMT

    wonderful piece.sachin has remained sachin all through these 23 years, he will not grow up, be sure.many will stop watchin cricket once sacnin is not there. he is a role model. but unfortunately nobody in indian cricket seems actually trying to follow him.they are more interested in modelling. t-20 has killed cricket.t-20 should not be called cricket.

  • Nav on February 24, 2013, 2:38 GMT

    Amazing player. Is Kohli the only replacement for him when he eventually retires?

    Feel free to visit my ipad tutorial website if you have time!

  • Neeraj Nayan on February 24, 2013, 2:13 GMT

    Wonderful piece, seemed like I was reliving my very early days with fond images of Sachin, and all his innings flashed through my head providing sheer pleasure for they have always been such a delight. He happens to be the lone entity who has had such a grip on time that all these years seemed still despite many proofs that it's not so. Would love to see him continue for few more years. His imprints will remain indelible for aeons not just as a cricketer but as a perfect role model that will inspire many more generations!!

  • bon on February 24, 2013, 1:49 GMT

    "It’s no fault of mine that I straddle between my life and his career. They are, but contiguous entities. " -- its a masterpiece..never commented on any article before but this was too good to resist.. I know I will write abt him when this guy retires and it will be very close to what you just wrote..one of the best articles abt HIM..ever.

  • gourave bagai on February 23, 2013, 21:53 GMT

    Dear Mr. Tendulkar,

    I am one of the millions whom you have graced when we have been wasted and wounded, dejected and rejected ,shackled and drawn; When we have felt , lost and low ,had our faith shaken

    but never hopeless-

    for there was always a Tendulkar innings;

    We need your heart,; We have felt weak, but never forsaken

    -for there was always a tendulkar innings.

    Looking for a road map,which will let us believe, in belief,

    Trudging through the dark in a world gone awry., holding steadfast in personal tragedies.

    For there was always a tendulakr innings

    When we have stood like a greek amongst his ruins, nothing look forward to with hope, nothing to look backward to with pride

    , mr tendulkar you have said, it will be all right-

    For there was always a tendulkar innings

    We have stood thru the drought, we have stood the flood, Wherever the road of good intentions has gone dry as a bone, You have made us feel, the world’s gonna change,- everything will be all right.

  • moinak on February 23, 2013, 20:02 GMT

    What a wonderful note !

  • Giri on February 23, 2013, 19:18 GMT

    I was there for that 175 against Australia at Hyderabad ..... a day of extreme highs and Lows ....

  • durgesh ballabh on February 23, 2013, 18:54 GMT

    united state is non cricket playing nation still the president of the nation once had a very special(in many ways) comment on the sachin tendulkar he said "i dont know about cricket but still i watch cricket to see sachin playing....not because i love his play its because to know the reason why my country's production goes down by 5% when he is batting

  • Anonymous on February 23, 2013, 18:38 GMT

    Excellent article, especially the connection between Sachin's innings and where we were in life at that time.

  • manoj bulchandani on February 23, 2013, 18:35 GMT

    Wonderfull article ,, very true ,, I think so many amongst us hve grown frm being schoolboys to nw .may be group leaders in their jobs . May b successfull businessman ,everybody is having his own story ,but one thing is common amongs all of us ,n tht is ,,we hve grown in life watching sachin tendulkar bat ,,,very difficult t predict life after sachin ,,, hats off dil se to one of the greatest sportsman ever seen by our generation.

  • T.M. Reddy on February 23, 2013, 18:33 GMT

    what a piece of beauty... After some lull.....

  • Rohit on February 23, 2013, 18:33 GMT

    The line,"My Sachin Tendulkar experience, I then realised, was the experience of my childhood", nearly brought me to tears. Great piece, Mr. Kishore.

  • deepak jha on February 23, 2013, 18:06 GMT

    Cricket meant the world to me, like many kids looking for a star in the horizan, i too was, that is when, you, our magic wand to forget all our miseries, the lightening thunder that made us live and keep living, hit the world capturing imagination of each indian, bringing in the sense of purity, pride and mesmerizing pride of indianness existed never before in our era, may be never after, we found a mortal bringing us as close or closer that we felt like one..be it your exquisite cover drives off waqar in your first series or absolute dissimation of abdul qadir when the old man was his arrogant best challenging a you, the kid, be it your hero cup last over heroics in kolkata, or back to back centuries in sarjah, we laughed for each of your lofts, or those incredible straight drives...be it the advent of paddle sweep to counter warne or that six off backfoot you hit of akhtar, each have been and will be enough of a reason for us as a cuntry to laugh an keep living while loving you..

  • narendra Sinha on February 23, 2013, 17:04 GMT

    The contents of the article are certainly not mine but the feelings, the longing, the wishings, the praying appear as if some body has just expressed what I had been feeling all these years. I am 75 years old but nothing has affected my psyche more than this incredible phenomenon called Sachin. Every body laughs when the politicians of this country talk about our country as "Incredible India". I can assure these politicians that 1.2 billion people of this country would not laugh if they use the word "Incredible" for Sachin.

  • Dharamdeep on February 23, 2013, 17:04 GMT

    The narration of the experience is superlative and of great aspiration to become a proximity to sachin.He is still so generous and down to earth after achieving so much in life is what the narrator is trying to portray and there will never ever be another Sachin in the years to come.He will always remain the real 'GEM' of cricket and we all are so privileged and honoured to be able to witness the 'LITTLE MASTER's uncomparable and tremendous batting.

  • Jatinder Singh on February 23, 2013, 16:30 GMT

    I am watching cricket since 1987 and I watched Sachin since he makes début; he is the best batsman in the World. every player goes through bad form some time in his career; I cannot understand why people criticise him for non performing and India loosing matches. I want to ask everybody Does India loose matches only because of Sachin; bowlers were unable to take wickets, none of batsman was scoring and in the end fault was of SRT as he didnt score.This reminds me of Azhar's time as captain; that time whole team was dependent on him, if he score India post good total or chase total and win other wise loose. Sachin is the best batsman in the world and will be best in the world. Its easy to criticise but very difficult to go there and play. Most of people had never given trials for district team and criticise after playing on streets. So guys dont criticise him he is the best and FYI he scores fifty in match.

  • S N IYER on February 23, 2013, 16:28 GMT

    It is difficult to think of Team India without SRT. He has been a vital part of that Team for more than 2 decades. Yet at times he is so authoritative and aggressive when he bats that one can not see him get out. His sense of sportsmanship is so complete, I have never seem him grumble or even hesitate to walk even when given out wrongly. A Master batsman with true sporting spirit can not be a good Captain of the Team as he is too involved in his professional excellence to worry about the failings of the Team.

  • Shivendra Agarwal on February 23, 2013, 16:24 GMT

    Great Read Kali! So When do I get read more of your work?

  • Paroon on February 23, 2013, 15:26 GMT

    My Sachin experience is hopefully getting complete on March 19th. How appropriate that I get to read this just a few days ahead of meeting the great one. Funny that so many of us out there share this feeling (I now call USA my home for past 12 years. All we need is one last burst of some great innings to set up the end of an era!

  • Hari on February 23, 2013, 14:57 GMT

    He being just 3 yrs elder to me͵ I have always seen my life and my career grow up with him. In fact - with Ganguly͵ Dravid and Kumble/Lax too! Their prime years coincided with some of the best years of my career too. Their retirement saddened me somehow - a feeling that I have aged. Now if/when Sach retires there would be a finality to it.

  • Nagendran on February 23, 2013, 14:54 GMT

    From Sri Lanka;what a wonderful appreciation of Sachin. Even today the way he played - 3 fours as he opened his account against the Australians ,the fascination of the the Chennai crowd as he walked in to bat, brought memories of my first impact as I watched at 0430AM (TV Colombo) his startling stroke play in New Zealand 20 years back.

  • Atul Krishna jha on February 23, 2013, 14:43 GMT

    Your experience about SRT is interesting ...As I recall my first experience of knowing him was the time of WC 96, when i first watched Sachin playing in wc against Srilanka .At that time i heard about cricket and greatness of Tendulkar . After that every morning ,i used to listen news for next coming match with my grandpa .I recall Sharjah and that year 1998 ,when i used to listen every hour news on AIR for the updates about cricket. Cricket news were used to come in last of news. After years of watching tendulkar till 1999 wc ,i became a big fan of master .I must say for me nothing gives more happiness then watching sachin playing in any format of game.

  • swarn singh on February 23, 2013, 14:43 GMT

    Here am I sharing experience with you all guys about sachins infinite long innings of cricket, no matter it has been a test match or onedayers. In those days when i was in my twenties and till now when i m in my fourteis, i have never felt that sachin has ever let me down in his batting His appearance in the ground as a genius Pro-cricketer who has hunger to play the cricket and present in the ground. Achievement of the milestone of 100's has been squared in the heart of all Indians and mine[100x100], lover of cricket of sachin. He is the idol and and a landmark for cricket itself for his atribution in the cricket ground and contribution for the country and as well as his individual game. God bless him

  • Sunil Pansare on February 23, 2013, 14:34 GMT

    Thanks Kali for sharing your experience! I just remembered how we (me and my 2 younger bros at home or my friends at hostel) used to switch off the TV, the moment SRT got out! How I used to bunk the lectures to watch him play!! As you said, He is an Experience...he indeed is! It is very tough to imagine cricket without the MASTER! He is a special gift by the original God to cricket!

  • Atul on February 23, 2013, 14:23 GMT

    Hopefully Pujara and/or Kohli will fill the gap left by SRT

  • AJEESH FERDIN T on February 23, 2013, 14:22 GMT

    All hail Master....

  • praveen phadke on February 23, 2013, 14:16 GMT

    Read that the world would end in 2012. But for me, half the world ended when the great man announced his retirement from one day internationals. Im now 40, and been following the master from my teens. My daughter is now 15, and she just doesnt seem to understand the immense admiration i hold for the Champion. I have never been to a stadium to watch him play, but my television at home becomes a arena where the battle between sachins bat and the opposition bowlers happen.

  • Kekul Sheth on February 23, 2013, 14:00 GMT

    Nice to read these musings!!! cannot imagine Indian cricket with out SRT on the cricket field with the indian team. Though i must admit i felt the same when sunny gavaskar(SMG) retired in 1987 until along came SRT in 1989. however one did not feel the possessiveness toward SMG as one does towards SRT!!!!

  • Amit S. Mulay on February 23, 2013, 13:34 GMT

    continued from the first note...

    ... That experience was enough for the past 12 years. He has stayed the same and his constant has been ours too. Through him, I have tried to hold on to whats most dear to me. I fear his retirement will be the retirement of my childhood too. The emergence of the elder statesmen isn't through personal choice but through people's opinion. For him and for me...

  • Amit S. Mulay on February 23, 2013, 13:26 GMT

    HI Kali,

    This is a wonderful read and a shared experience. I did grow up in Mumbai and moved away as part of 'growing up'. I chased him once on my new bike in Bandra 12 years ago. Possibly the only Merc SL in Mumbai at the time had stopped at the lights with myself. And the street kids went to it like bees. Not one had their hands out asking for anything, they just wanted a glimpse of the man. In that one moment of realisation, I was with them. All the foibles of caste, creed and every other differentiator within our culture and society was forgotten. Those kids who wouldn't generally get a word out of me,they were after the same thing as me. We shared the same smile and it didn't matter that we did. The traffic, for once, was helpful. I chased him a few hundred meters of more than risky riding. Eventually, the passenger window dropped and I got the hand raised in a wave and the black glasses. The window went up and my experience was complete. Been chasing him ever since.

  • Saurabh Khosla on February 23, 2013, 13:21 GMT

    Yes, life will be different the day this guy announces retirement! To think of it, having grown up with his rise this information will age me by at least 10 years in one go. Sometimes, its difficult to imagine how my childhood would have been without his flamboyance on TV! His teary eyes after 2011 WC win still raw in memories.. cant thank him much!though I have not met him yet.. can relate to the above easily!

  • Swapnil on February 23, 2013, 13:19 GMT

    What a beautiful piece, thank you!

  • Anonymous on February 23, 2013, 13:13 GMT

    Very nice. A pleasure to read. Thanks.

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  • Anonymous on February 23, 2013, 13:13 GMT

    Very nice. A pleasure to read. Thanks.

  • Swapnil on February 23, 2013, 13:19 GMT

    What a beautiful piece, thank you!

  • Saurabh Khosla on February 23, 2013, 13:21 GMT

    Yes, life will be different the day this guy announces retirement! To think of it, having grown up with his rise this information will age me by at least 10 years in one go. Sometimes, its difficult to imagine how my childhood would have been without his flamboyance on TV! His teary eyes after 2011 WC win still raw in memories.. cant thank him much!though I have not met him yet.. can relate to the above easily!

  • Amit S. Mulay on February 23, 2013, 13:26 GMT

    HI Kali,

    This is a wonderful read and a shared experience. I did grow up in Mumbai and moved away as part of 'growing up'. I chased him once on my new bike in Bandra 12 years ago. Possibly the only Merc SL in Mumbai at the time had stopped at the lights with myself. And the street kids went to it like bees. Not one had their hands out asking for anything, they just wanted a glimpse of the man. In that one moment of realisation, I was with them. All the foibles of caste, creed and every other differentiator within our culture and society was forgotten. Those kids who wouldn't generally get a word out of me,they were after the same thing as me. We shared the same smile and it didn't matter that we did. The traffic, for once, was helpful. I chased him a few hundred meters of more than risky riding. Eventually, the passenger window dropped and I got the hand raised in a wave and the black glasses. The window went up and my experience was complete. Been chasing him ever since.

  • Amit S. Mulay on February 23, 2013, 13:34 GMT

    continued from the first note...

    ... That experience was enough for the past 12 years. He has stayed the same and his constant has been ours too. Through him, I have tried to hold on to whats most dear to me. I fear his retirement will be the retirement of my childhood too. The emergence of the elder statesmen isn't through personal choice but through people's opinion. For him and for me...

  • Kekul Sheth on February 23, 2013, 14:00 GMT

    Nice to read these musings!!! cannot imagine Indian cricket with out SRT on the cricket field with the indian team. Though i must admit i felt the same when sunny gavaskar(SMG) retired in 1987 until along came SRT in 1989. however one did not feel the possessiveness toward SMG as one does towards SRT!!!!

  • praveen phadke on February 23, 2013, 14:16 GMT

    Read that the world would end in 2012. But for me, half the world ended when the great man announced his retirement from one day internationals. Im now 40, and been following the master from my teens. My daughter is now 15, and she just doesnt seem to understand the immense admiration i hold for the Champion. I have never been to a stadium to watch him play, but my television at home becomes a arena where the battle between sachins bat and the opposition bowlers happen.

  • AJEESH FERDIN T on February 23, 2013, 14:22 GMT

    All hail Master....

  • Atul on February 23, 2013, 14:23 GMT

    Hopefully Pujara and/or Kohli will fill the gap left by SRT

  • Sunil Pansare on February 23, 2013, 14:34 GMT

    Thanks Kali for sharing your experience! I just remembered how we (me and my 2 younger bros at home or my friends at hostel) used to switch off the TV, the moment SRT got out! How I used to bunk the lectures to watch him play!! As you said, He is an Experience...he indeed is! It is very tough to imagine cricket without the MASTER! He is a special gift by the original God to cricket!