ICC anti-doping policy August 5, 2009

Treat cricketers differently - Yuvraj

Cricinfo staff
29

Yuvraj Singh has hit back at the criticism over the Indian cricketers' decision to reject the World Anti Doping Agency's regulations concerning drug testing, asking for cricketers to be treated differently from other sportsmen.

"Their sports and our sport is different," he said. "We play more and we get very little time with our families and I feel we are travelling more. We are playing a lot of time in a year and we should be given more space, with due respect to other sports."

The 11 Indian cricketers in the ICC's testing pool have raised concerns that the code's 'whereabouts' clause that will require them to divulge information about their location three months in advance and say that this that could violate privacy and threaten their security. However, several top Indian athletes previously tested by WADA have said the code does not infringe on privacy.

The extensive travelling, Yuvraj said, gave India's cricketers too few days to spend at home each year. "After nine months of playing, we come home for just ten days," he told news channel CNN-IBN. "We don't want somebody to intrude upon our privacy for dope tests during that small period. We have put out our points in front of the BCCI and they will speak to the ICC."

The Indian sports minister MS Gill endorsed the view of some of India's leading athletes who've expressed no problems subscribing to the code, saying all national sports bodies and players should support the WADA and adhere to its regulations. The BCCI plans to ask the ICC to walk out of the WADA umbrella and develop a cricket-specific anti-doping code, but cricket's governing body is unlikely to support such a suggestion.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • qalandar4 on August 7, 2009, 1:54 GMT

    The explanations offered offer a constantly shifting target: the BCCI says security is its main concern -- but security was not even mentioned in yesterday's CNN-IBN interview with yuvraj and the BCCI's rajiv Shukla. The focus was on privacy and how cricketers were "different" in yuvraj's estimation. It's ridiculous (I agree that some cricketers have genuine security concerns, but that can be worked out with some appropriate protocol; to sweep away the whereabouts clause in its entirety is like throwing the baby out with the bathwater), and I completely agree with the Indian sports minister, who has rightly pooh-poohed the objections. The BCCI needs to learn that with great power comes great responsibility -- nothing that the board has done over the last year or two suggests that they appreciate this. As a die hard fan of the Indian cricket team, this is embarrassing.

  • cricsand on August 6, 2009, 19:32 GMT

    Lets try and be a little objective here. We seem to make the players off field activities like ads and such our favorite whipping toy whenever something like this comes up. And to the argument, that they should go through whatever draconian measures that are put in front of them just because they are leading sportsmen and its their responsibility. Lets stop and think for a moment from the players perspective as well. The whereabouts clause is ludicrous. I'm not sure why the other players in the world have accepted it in spite of having strong reservations about it. Just because everyone has accepted it does not make it right. Specifically with the case of Sachin and Dhoni who have threats against their lives. If I was in there situation, I would not be disclosing any information about my whereabouts for the next 3 months down to the hour if I had a security threat to any 3rd party. What is the guarantee that the information sent to WADA over the internet cannot be hacked into?

  • abinanthan on August 6, 2009, 14:12 GMT

    Well well... So for how long FIFA is negotiating with WADA on the "whereabout" clause and what kind of response WADA has given? Yes, comments like these made by Yuvraj as mentioned in the article are stupid. But why WADA is behaving like a big brother? Why cant they come to the table and arrive at a solution if not with the cricketers, with the FIFA?

  • Copernicus on August 6, 2009, 13:53 GMT

    "Yuvaraj is absolutely correct and strong in his statement ICC always like to suppress indian players" - RengaRamanuajn. Thanks for the biggest laugh I've had all day! That hilarious piece of ironic humour caused me to genuinely LOL.

  • Subra on August 6, 2009, 13:48 GMT

    There was a suggestion made that the players register their personal phones with the board. The WADA then gives 24 hour notice of the test to the player who informs WADA where he will be during that period. This is I feel a lot more preferable than the 'whereabouts' clause to which the Indian cricketers are strongly objecting. It is a compromise worth considering, because the Indian cricketers too are against any form of 'doping' like all other decent sportsmen. It is a question of give and take to ensure a peaceful solution. Confrontation doesn't solve the problem. Siva from Singapore

  • Mahesh_AV on August 6, 2009, 13:17 GMT

    It is wrong of Yuvraj Singh to say other sports are different to Cricket in terms of the schedules maintained by all. Having said that, I would like to ask all those who criticise the Indian cricketers on this issue, if they can submit a schedule of their lives for 3 months with little margin for change and heavy penalties for wrong information. Just because "millions" of atheletes across the globe did not question this clause, it does not mean that Indian cricketers are against dope testing, as suggested in some of the posts. Nobody is against dope testing. All they are saying is that they cannot provide details of their whereabouts in advance, be it for security reasons or simply privacy. I really wonder how many of us know exactly where we will be in the next 24 hours, hour by hour, let alone the next 3 months!!!!

  • shak01 on August 6, 2009, 11:25 GMT

    this is all a little silly and I must echo some of the comments made by other posters on this. The Indian cricketers need to give their egos a reality check. Merchandise and money wise Cricket is certainly not the biggest sport and Yuvraj's comment of cricketers playing and travelling 9 months a year is laughable. Last time I checked most of the "big sports" involve the same level of travel such as football (even more in a world cup year), athletics, tennis, golf etc etc. I do think that Cricket needs a slightly modified doping code as there is more skill involved than some other sports (ie a cricketer on steroids might not necessarily have the same advantage as a sprinter on steroids). But apart from that unless the Indian cricketers have something to hide they need to keep quiet (unless I've missed it I don't think the likes of Tendulkar have waded into the subject, only the younger upstarts).

  • manikolbe on August 6, 2009, 11:15 GMT

    You simply cannot comapre indian cricketers with any other indian sportsmen. They have a very high celebrity rating. They cannot even walk through a public road without security. They are also prime targets to terrorists. See what happened to srilankan players few months back!! For these reasons they cannot reveal they day today schedule for three months to someone else. Why people donot understand this!!!

  • dipibs on August 6, 2009, 10:34 GMT

    i can't understand why we are blaming only cricketers!!!! fifa are still continuing its negotiations with wada, whereas both rodger fedrer and rafael nadal expressed their concern regarding whereabouts clause..... Therefore it is the responsibility for WADA to educate sportsperson throughout the world regarding their clause so that all of them can understand the clause..........................

  • HundredPercentBarcelonista on August 6, 2009, 9:49 GMT

    Well even your so-called impeccable Tendulkar doesn't want the whereabouts clause so it's not like he's any better than Yuvraj on this issue. As for India being the only country with a cult culture, you really need to see how footballers are adored in Europe. Even America is obsessed with its athletes, which is why Tiger Woods stands head and shoulders above the rest.

  • qalandar4 on August 7, 2009, 1:54 GMT

    The explanations offered offer a constantly shifting target: the BCCI says security is its main concern -- but security was not even mentioned in yesterday's CNN-IBN interview with yuvraj and the BCCI's rajiv Shukla. The focus was on privacy and how cricketers were "different" in yuvraj's estimation. It's ridiculous (I agree that some cricketers have genuine security concerns, but that can be worked out with some appropriate protocol; to sweep away the whereabouts clause in its entirety is like throwing the baby out with the bathwater), and I completely agree with the Indian sports minister, who has rightly pooh-poohed the objections. The BCCI needs to learn that with great power comes great responsibility -- nothing that the board has done over the last year or two suggests that they appreciate this. As a die hard fan of the Indian cricket team, this is embarrassing.

  • cricsand on August 6, 2009, 19:32 GMT

    Lets try and be a little objective here. We seem to make the players off field activities like ads and such our favorite whipping toy whenever something like this comes up. And to the argument, that they should go through whatever draconian measures that are put in front of them just because they are leading sportsmen and its their responsibility. Lets stop and think for a moment from the players perspective as well. The whereabouts clause is ludicrous. I'm not sure why the other players in the world have accepted it in spite of having strong reservations about it. Just because everyone has accepted it does not make it right. Specifically with the case of Sachin and Dhoni who have threats against their lives. If I was in there situation, I would not be disclosing any information about my whereabouts for the next 3 months down to the hour if I had a security threat to any 3rd party. What is the guarantee that the information sent to WADA over the internet cannot be hacked into?

  • abinanthan on August 6, 2009, 14:12 GMT

    Well well... So for how long FIFA is negotiating with WADA on the "whereabout" clause and what kind of response WADA has given? Yes, comments like these made by Yuvraj as mentioned in the article are stupid. But why WADA is behaving like a big brother? Why cant they come to the table and arrive at a solution if not with the cricketers, with the FIFA?

  • Copernicus on August 6, 2009, 13:53 GMT

    "Yuvaraj is absolutely correct and strong in his statement ICC always like to suppress indian players" - RengaRamanuajn. Thanks for the biggest laugh I've had all day! That hilarious piece of ironic humour caused me to genuinely LOL.

  • Subra on August 6, 2009, 13:48 GMT

    There was a suggestion made that the players register their personal phones with the board. The WADA then gives 24 hour notice of the test to the player who informs WADA where he will be during that period. This is I feel a lot more preferable than the 'whereabouts' clause to which the Indian cricketers are strongly objecting. It is a compromise worth considering, because the Indian cricketers too are against any form of 'doping' like all other decent sportsmen. It is a question of give and take to ensure a peaceful solution. Confrontation doesn't solve the problem. Siva from Singapore

  • Mahesh_AV on August 6, 2009, 13:17 GMT

    It is wrong of Yuvraj Singh to say other sports are different to Cricket in terms of the schedules maintained by all. Having said that, I would like to ask all those who criticise the Indian cricketers on this issue, if they can submit a schedule of their lives for 3 months with little margin for change and heavy penalties for wrong information. Just because "millions" of atheletes across the globe did not question this clause, it does not mean that Indian cricketers are against dope testing, as suggested in some of the posts. Nobody is against dope testing. All they are saying is that they cannot provide details of their whereabouts in advance, be it for security reasons or simply privacy. I really wonder how many of us know exactly where we will be in the next 24 hours, hour by hour, let alone the next 3 months!!!!

  • shak01 on August 6, 2009, 11:25 GMT

    this is all a little silly and I must echo some of the comments made by other posters on this. The Indian cricketers need to give their egos a reality check. Merchandise and money wise Cricket is certainly not the biggest sport and Yuvraj's comment of cricketers playing and travelling 9 months a year is laughable. Last time I checked most of the "big sports" involve the same level of travel such as football (even more in a world cup year), athletics, tennis, golf etc etc. I do think that Cricket needs a slightly modified doping code as there is more skill involved than some other sports (ie a cricketer on steroids might not necessarily have the same advantage as a sprinter on steroids). But apart from that unless the Indian cricketers have something to hide they need to keep quiet (unless I've missed it I don't think the likes of Tendulkar have waded into the subject, only the younger upstarts).

  • manikolbe on August 6, 2009, 11:15 GMT

    You simply cannot comapre indian cricketers with any other indian sportsmen. They have a very high celebrity rating. They cannot even walk through a public road without security. They are also prime targets to terrorists. See what happened to srilankan players few months back!! For these reasons they cannot reveal they day today schedule for three months to someone else. Why people donot understand this!!!

  • dipibs on August 6, 2009, 10:34 GMT

    i can't understand why we are blaming only cricketers!!!! fifa are still continuing its negotiations with wada, whereas both rodger fedrer and rafael nadal expressed their concern regarding whereabouts clause..... Therefore it is the responsibility for WADA to educate sportsperson throughout the world regarding their clause so that all of them can understand the clause..........................

  • HundredPercentBarcelonista on August 6, 2009, 9:49 GMT

    Well even your so-called impeccable Tendulkar doesn't want the whereabouts clause so it's not like he's any better than Yuvraj on this issue. As for India being the only country with a cult culture, you really need to see how footballers are adored in Europe. Even America is obsessed with its athletes, which is why Tiger Woods stands head and shoulders above the rest.

  • IPLHoopla on August 6, 2009, 9:37 GMT

    i don't hear any word from any cricketers in the world. don't know why indian cricketers make a fuss of this while millions of athletes around the world are following the rules. and if they think they're travelling more, they need to check their mind. please. they just visit max 8 countries in a year for professional reason. where they stay for months. while tennis players, travels almost around the world for a short time. First time i didn't like the attitude of Indian cricketers. so all yuvrajs, dhonis and harbhajans and BCCIs should stop all this nonsense. and, they are paid like anything. what are they fussing about? i am totally in favour of disqualifying them if they don't follow. i can understand if entire world is against the rule. but everyone follows it. what the hell indian cricketer's problem. neither ricky ponting (who is much bigger than dhonis and yuvrajs) nor flintoff have said anything. rather Not a single cricketer.

  • popcorn on August 6, 2009, 9:01 GMT

    With the exception of the humble Sachin Tendulkar,who is on par with respect to greatness compared to Top Athletes in ALL sports,Indian Cricketers have grown too big for their boots - in fact they are not worthy of the superstar status. It is only in India that cultism is practised. That is why these cricketers do not know the meaning of humility.They are not even worth an ounce of Tiger Woods or Roger Federer who have accepted WADA norms. Don't they require privacy? It is time BCCI and these whimsical cricketers are put in their place. If BCCI does not watch out,and presses its luck too far,ICC should take a tough stand and ban the Indian Cricket Team from participating in the fothcoming Champions Trophy.If BCCI thinks ICC needs their money and revenues from TV rights,they are wrong.We are happy watching The Ashes and other world events for which we pay Cable Operators.BCCI has done great harm to ethical cricket,the way it has been for 100 years till BCCI's muscling came into pla

  • krangs on August 6, 2009, 8:33 GMT

    Cricketers in India are treated (although idiotically) like demi gods. The problem is that these cricketers start believing that they are really demi gods. If these guys wants to be professional sportsmen hen they have to start accepting these "occupational hazards". These guys are not above the law. BCCI should stop bullying the cricketting fraternity lest ICC (as it is often mentioned in jest) would stand for "India Controls Cricket".

  • poyta on August 6, 2009, 8:14 GMT

    Have been thinking for a long time now that maybe Yuvraj loves himself a bit too much and is wasn't the brightest guy on the team. Now he has confirmed it.

    Really he can't even count to twelve. Gets to eleven months and thinks the rest of the year is made up of ten days!

    Having read the requirements on the players and considering how just about every other sport is already signed up I can't see what all the objection is???

    You are not God, you are a cricketer and Flintoff is better than you anyway!

  • sandyhit on August 6, 2009, 8:05 GMT

    "We play more and we get very little time with our families and I feel we are travelling more. We are playing a lot of time in a year and we should be given more space, with due respect to other sports.".......what a stupidest comment I have ever read.................will Yuvi know the other games how much travel they needed,specially tennis?????I know there will be a security concern,but tennis players are maintaining that........and I dont think Indian cricketers are more popular than federer or nadal?????If they can sign even after concern abt WADA rules and still maintain that,then why not Indian cricketers............Sports have to be dope free................and cricket should not be an exception............and the people who think that cricket is more popular game or cricketers play more than other sports are either ignorant abt other sports or are illeterate

  • rakesh23 on August 6, 2009, 7:42 GMT

    guys.. be sensible.. all those cricketers have time for brand endorsing , advertisements, inaugrations and what else and now they are complaining of lack of quality time to spend with familly.. i dont think so WADA testing will takes hours to complete.. may be max 1 hr and for that also these cricketers have problem and this is not done everyday .. i suppose.. and yuvaraj was complaining abt the high travel also.. they are paid for that only.. apart from big money .. you must be exempted from all the requirements too.. and they travel during the season and they like it or not they will be tested at any time..

  • HundredPercentBarcelonista on August 6, 2009, 5:38 GMT

    The schedule they provide to WADA isn't set in stone. An athlete can make changes to it any time.

    Please don't talk about travel times in India. They're nothing compared to how much tennis players travel on the ATP Tour. As for tennis being an an individual sport unlike cricket, isn't Yuvraj asking for some privacy during the off-season? So it's not like he'd have to make the ultimate sacrifice if the meds came calling.

  • RengaRamanuajn on August 6, 2009, 5:33 GMT

    Yuvaraj is absolutely correct and strong in his statement ICC always like to suppress indian players

  • Margin_of_Safety on August 6, 2009, 5:31 GMT

    It is more like - Treat the INDIAN cricketers differently....c'mon thats what u guys are paid highly for....it comes with the territory Yuvraj......

  • Shaitaan on August 6, 2009, 5:29 GMT

    Dear Mr HundredPercent, personally i think Yuvraj is a prat, and if you look around even just on cricinfo see there's little support from Indian fans for the cricketers over this. However, and this is important, there are at least two cricketers (Sachin Tendulkar and MS Dhoni) who are known to be on the hit-list of international terror groups. High-profile Indian cricketers make high-profile targets. Whether Papua New Guinea should be the commercial hub of cricket intead of India, or whether these guys will 'get their commeuppance' as you wish to happen, is hardly relevant. Even if their privacy be damned, addressing at least the security concerns of these cricketers is necessary -- it's about a little more than their feeling entitled over 'every little thing'. Sitting across a table and discussing someting never hurt anyone. (Although they do fling mics at each other in some Houses of Parliament around the world.)

  • MahaH on August 6, 2009, 5:16 GMT

    Cricketers travel a lot more? Seriously? Yuvraj, you need a reality check. Tennis players travel all year round, every week, and the doping policies for them are so much harsher. Yet they comply. Honestly, if Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have to be put through it all, where does Yuvraj Singh stand? It's time Indian cricket stopped trying to be the boss of everything and agreed to tested like everyone else. Unless of course, they have something to hide.

  • jamrith on August 6, 2009, 4:50 GMT

    Yes, it is high time Indian cricketers are treated differently-- the game is an anachronism in India. Don't forget that Australia, England and South Africa excel in many games and have won numerous Olympic medals. In India, it is cricket all the way and all we have to show for it is 2 trophies in 60+ years. Let us downgrade this game, and invest money in other sports which would be more accessible to our younger generation and improve their physical well-being even if we don't produce world champions overnight. I am talking about athletics,swimming,tennis,football,hockey,badminton, shooting, cycling, rowing, even golf. Then, the Yuvrajs and Bajjies can enjoy their privacy and we will also see less of the egregious Lalit Modi .

  • cricdizzle on August 6, 2009, 4:50 GMT

    Actually, the Indian cricketers are correct. Golf, Tennis and track athletes is a terrible example as they are individual sports. Those athletes can take tournaments off, since they're individuals. Cricketers can't just take days off for world tours, it affects the entire TEAM. When comparing other team sports, baseball and basketball in the US (or any country) is domestic, while other world sports, such as field hockey and Rugby I suppose, do not have nearly as rigorous a schedule as cricket does.

  • RanjiMathew on August 6, 2009, 4:48 GMT

    Yuvraj Singh or any other cricketer can quit playing cricket if they are afraid of dope testing. Why should there be a cricket-specific anti doping code? They can opt by not playing. Nobody is forcing them to play cricket.

  • Siddharth_Pandit on August 6, 2009, 4:39 GMT

    I feel there is a dim light in Yuvi's statement. I don't endorse him 100%, but cricketers are actually treated different in India than any other country. Blame it on me, you and everybody else. How many of us recognize, forget greet, a footballer or tennis player who is in national team? When a cricketer walks out the mob jumps on him, compromising his security. Though they would like the first part, the second part concerns them the most. Sportsmen all over the world are treated as sportsmen irrespective of whether he is a cricketer or belonging to any other Olympic game. This case is not applicable in India. I totally contradict HundredPercentBarcelonista over his argument. Pls put facts after comparing the travel time including the time spend before the start of tour in warm-up matches and practice. They hardly get 10 days break in 7 months and then u want them to follow a plan they gave to WADA 3 months back or serve a 3 year ban (in case you become a defaulter thrice)? Woah !!

  • Aspraso on August 6, 2009, 4:33 GMT

    Indian cricketers are not sportsmen -- quite like our politicians who are VVVIP/VVIP/VIP/ citizens and hence above law. It is a way of life in India.

  • jakefrep on August 6, 2009, 4:32 GMT

    Why is WADA so unwilling to have any sort of dialogue with athletes or governing bodies about its policies? It shouldn't be taboo for an athlete to question anti-doping policy. No sport should be expected to turn drugs policy over to a bunch of bureaucrats who know nothnig of their sport.

  • SunilPotnis on August 6, 2009, 3:56 GMT

    Why should cricketers be treated differently? Are other sportsmen/Athletes inferior or what? Yuvraj stop making excuses, all cricketers get paid royally for all the travel or be it bench warming so why the complain. Best way is to keep away from doping. I don't think anyone should get any special treatment when it comes to test for doping. That will be unfair for sports itself.

  • HundredPercentBarcelonista on August 6, 2009, 3:27 GMT

    Someone tell Mr. Singh that golfers, track and field athletes and tennis players are on tour for just as much as cricketers if not more. these guys think they are entitled to every little thing just because India is the commercial home of cricket. One day it won't be and then the same guys will get what's coming to them.

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  • HundredPercentBarcelonista on August 6, 2009, 3:27 GMT

    Someone tell Mr. Singh that golfers, track and field athletes and tennis players are on tour for just as much as cricketers if not more. these guys think they are entitled to every little thing just because India is the commercial home of cricket. One day it won't be and then the same guys will get what's coming to them.

  • SunilPotnis on August 6, 2009, 3:56 GMT

    Why should cricketers be treated differently? Are other sportsmen/Athletes inferior or what? Yuvraj stop making excuses, all cricketers get paid royally for all the travel or be it bench warming so why the complain. Best way is to keep away from doping. I don't think anyone should get any special treatment when it comes to test for doping. That will be unfair for sports itself.

  • jakefrep on August 6, 2009, 4:32 GMT

    Why is WADA so unwilling to have any sort of dialogue with athletes or governing bodies about its policies? It shouldn't be taboo for an athlete to question anti-doping policy. No sport should be expected to turn drugs policy over to a bunch of bureaucrats who know nothnig of their sport.

  • Aspraso on August 6, 2009, 4:33 GMT

    Indian cricketers are not sportsmen -- quite like our politicians who are VVVIP/VVIP/VIP/ citizens and hence above law. It is a way of life in India.

  • Siddharth_Pandit on August 6, 2009, 4:39 GMT

    I feel there is a dim light in Yuvi's statement. I don't endorse him 100%, but cricketers are actually treated different in India than any other country. Blame it on me, you and everybody else. How many of us recognize, forget greet, a footballer or tennis player who is in national team? When a cricketer walks out the mob jumps on him, compromising his security. Though they would like the first part, the second part concerns them the most. Sportsmen all over the world are treated as sportsmen irrespective of whether he is a cricketer or belonging to any other Olympic game. This case is not applicable in India. I totally contradict HundredPercentBarcelonista over his argument. Pls put facts after comparing the travel time including the time spend before the start of tour in warm-up matches and practice. They hardly get 10 days break in 7 months and then u want them to follow a plan they gave to WADA 3 months back or serve a 3 year ban (in case you become a defaulter thrice)? Woah !!

  • RanjiMathew on August 6, 2009, 4:48 GMT

    Yuvraj Singh or any other cricketer can quit playing cricket if they are afraid of dope testing. Why should there be a cricket-specific anti doping code? They can opt by not playing. Nobody is forcing them to play cricket.

  • cricdizzle on August 6, 2009, 4:50 GMT

    Actually, the Indian cricketers are correct. Golf, Tennis and track athletes is a terrible example as they are individual sports. Those athletes can take tournaments off, since they're individuals. Cricketers can't just take days off for world tours, it affects the entire TEAM. When comparing other team sports, baseball and basketball in the US (or any country) is domestic, while other world sports, such as field hockey and Rugby I suppose, do not have nearly as rigorous a schedule as cricket does.

  • jamrith on August 6, 2009, 4:50 GMT

    Yes, it is high time Indian cricketers are treated differently-- the game is an anachronism in India. Don't forget that Australia, England and South Africa excel in many games and have won numerous Olympic medals. In India, it is cricket all the way and all we have to show for it is 2 trophies in 60+ years. Let us downgrade this game, and invest money in other sports which would be more accessible to our younger generation and improve their physical well-being even if we don't produce world champions overnight. I am talking about athletics,swimming,tennis,football,hockey,badminton, shooting, cycling, rowing, even golf. Then, the Yuvrajs and Bajjies can enjoy their privacy and we will also see less of the egregious Lalit Modi .

  • MahaH on August 6, 2009, 5:16 GMT

    Cricketers travel a lot more? Seriously? Yuvraj, you need a reality check. Tennis players travel all year round, every week, and the doping policies for them are so much harsher. Yet they comply. Honestly, if Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have to be put through it all, where does Yuvraj Singh stand? It's time Indian cricket stopped trying to be the boss of everything and agreed to tested like everyone else. Unless of course, they have something to hide.

  • Shaitaan on August 6, 2009, 5:29 GMT

    Dear Mr HundredPercent, personally i think Yuvraj is a prat, and if you look around even just on cricinfo see there's little support from Indian fans for the cricketers over this. However, and this is important, there are at least two cricketers (Sachin Tendulkar and MS Dhoni) who are known to be on the hit-list of international terror groups. High-profile Indian cricketers make high-profile targets. Whether Papua New Guinea should be the commercial hub of cricket intead of India, or whether these guys will 'get their commeuppance' as you wish to happen, is hardly relevant. Even if their privacy be damned, addressing at least the security concerns of these cricketers is necessary -- it's about a little more than their feeling entitled over 'every little thing'. Sitting across a table and discussing someting never hurt anyone. (Although they do fling mics at each other in some Houses of Parliament around the world.)