August 6, 2010

Gavaskar v Sehwag

What if two greats of Indian cricket were to bat together? One thing is for sure: they'd do things their way
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I know it isn't possible, but what the hell, we think about it all the time. We try and compare players from different generations, and while that is not just unfair but impossible to do, I have been spending a lot of time (an advantage of being on one flight too many) thinking of what it would be to watch Sunil Gavaskar and Virender Sehwag, the two Indian opening batsmen at either end of my cricket-watching interval, bat together.

For starters, both would enjoy it. Gavaskar has always said that his bread-and-butter shot was the single, and he could take it almost as a ticket to the show at the other end. And Sehwag could see the powerful cocoon Gavaskar built around himself, so single-minded was he in constructing an innings.

But even more fascinating would be to see the difference in style. Gavaskar was the classical old-school batsman, body right behind the line of the ball, bat straight as a well-constructed wall (Rahul Dravid was version 2.0). One of the great joys of watching cricket for us was to see Gavaskar up on his toes, eyes like an assassin's, never wavering from the object of attention, meeting with his bat a ball projected at his throat, letting it dribble meekly down its face, now devoid of any potency, and fall dead by his toes. Gavaskar played some of the most attractive shots you will see - the straight drive was for posterity - but the way he neutralised the venom of a bouncer defined him for me.

To Gavaskar, and indeed to many of his generation, the wicket was a citadel that could not be breached. It had to be protected like a family heirloom. When you were sure it was safe, you played the bold shot. But you were not encouraged to hit in the air, and if you were stumped by a yard trying to hit a six when on 99, you were probably made to stand in a corner.

But when Sehwag does it, it doesn't evoke howls of protest. Sehwag is the warrior who must conquer many lands and only then return home for a meal. If he cannot attack, if the bowler's offering is so compact that shot-making is not an option, only then will he defend. There are no heirlooms any more. If you lose a BlackBerry, you buy another. Or if you think blue looks cool, you buy another. Occasionally in trying to spear the opponent you leave a flank open and pay for it, but that is just one of the hurdles of doing a job.

And so Sehwag, such a product of this generation, must play beside the line rather than classically behind it. The feet provide support to the body but don't have a huge role to play in shot-making. You let the ball draw alongside and then, with the space you now possess, you either slice it to bits or smite it to the boundary. It is an altogether more violent form of batting. If Sehwag got behind the line of the ball, like he sometimes does when it is too straight, he wouldn't have the space or the freedom to play his way.

The Gavaskar approach was maddening to a bowler. Robin Jackman once told me of how Gavaskar didn't let him see the off stump for an entire spell. "He made me bowl where he wanted me to bowl rather than where I wanted to bowl," he said. The Sehwag approach is to put fear in a bowler's mind. "He must know when he is running in that if he bowls a bad ball, Sehwag will hit it for four," he once said. Just as a bowler can induce a tense batsman to play a bad shot, so too can Sehwag force an uncertain bowler to bowl a bad ball.

With Sehwag you have fear and hope, with Gavaskar it was like hitting your head on a rock at the sheer futility of bowling. Gavaskar would never have got stumped on 99, and he wouldn't have tried to hit a six on 195 either. Two different styles you could not hope to see in a lifetime. But at the corresponding points in their career (79 Tests each), a mere 88 runs separate them. The difference in batting average is but 0.68.

Eventually, therefore, it is about doing things as you know best; as two brilliant cricketers 30 years apart have shown.

Harsha Bhogle is a commentator, television presenter and writer. His Twitter feed is here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on August 9, 2010, 18:36 GMT

    yr assasment is vry good .both are great but gavaskar is don bradman is of idia cricket he install cofidence in coming generation by taking sigle handedly on great westendies sides.He is also voice of indian cricket.he raise his voice during 2008 sydney test for india.for this auusies insulted him by not asking him to present at podium during distribution of gavaskar border trophy,its only pity on australian.he is grest legend in indian mind will remain so cricket will going to played on this earth.

  • muski on August 9, 2010, 15:03 GMT

    Prasad- No wonder Dravid has still not got his due in Indian Cricket. We are looking at the entertainment value in Test Cricket rather than the " test" of cricketing skills. From what you say, Lalit Modis glitz and glamour tamasha is more suited for you. Iam sure you will get plenty of what you want there.

  • muski on August 9, 2010, 14:03 GMT

    Prasad- No wonder Dravid has still not got his due in Indian Cricket. We are looking at the entertainment value in Test Cricket rather than the " test" of cricketing skills. From what you say, Lalit Modis glitz and glamour tamasha is more suited for you. Iam sure you will get plenty of what you want there.

  • Kaze on August 9, 2010, 12:51 GMT

    To compare these two is like comparing chalk and cheese. If you look at Sehwags' record against McGrath you will see he failed miserably. He was dismissed 4 times in 5 Tests for an average of 8.50 (http://stats.cricinfo.com/ci/engine/player/35263.html?class=1;opposition=2;template=results;type=batting;view=bowler_summary) very similar for Steyn as well. Sehwag never faced Ambrose in Tests and I really wouldn't back him to even average 10 against the fast bowlers that Gavaskar faced. He slashes too much on off stump, which is fine on the subcontinent by elsewhere with a bit more bounce and it's slip catching practice.

  • on August 9, 2010, 12:36 GMT

    Indian score at the end of the first day will be 300 for no loss with Sehwag on 290 from 200 balls and Gavaskar on 10 from 340 balls.

  • muski on August 9, 2010, 11:20 GMT

    Abhishek- For God's sake dont make such sweeping statements. This is the kind of stand that kills sports in India. We did the same to number of sports person like Jaspal Rana, Narain Karthikeyan, Sania Mirza etc and by the the time this got to their head, they we no were in the scene. Yes- Sehwag can claim the greatness which you are now bestowing on him if he continues to perform in the same manner in the next 70 tests as he has done in his first 70 or 80 tests. Harsha must be having a good laugh at all our comparision Viv vs Lara, Viv vs Sunny, Sunny vs Sehwag, Tendulkar vs all of them etc. Its just good time pass and nothing else.@ sports scientist- you are right- most people do like sportsmen more from the heart and not from the head- thats why a Sania Mirza in her designer dress and awful tennis gets more fans than the world beater Siana Nehwal does. We cant help that can we?

  • on August 9, 2010, 5:35 GMT

    To say the least, Sehwag is the greatest batsman ever after Bradman.

  • muski on August 9, 2010, 4:58 GMT

    Sports Scientist- Now I get your point. There again I beg to differ. You cant compare Viv to Lara and vice versa. Its not Lara's fault that he played in the helmet area or in an era where the quality of fast bowling was not that great.However remember that Lara had to negotiate better quality spin than Sir Viv had to.By the time Viv was in his prime, the Indian quatret was in their last phase of their career. Lara has done all that he could to be counted among the best batsmen the game will ever see. @ Suresh Lalvani- You have hit the nail on its head. Having come from Gary's mouth, will anybody very dispute it. Yes- Imran still can if he wishes to!!!!!!

  • AmirBalouch on August 9, 2010, 4:14 GMT

    @cantwaittosee.. although Gav was a player of his time but comparing his last innings as a dream come true specially for legends as Bradman, Lara or even Tendulkar is like comparing apple to oranges. india also lost that game by 16 runs.. i would personally rather rate Tendulkar or Lara as the living legends of cricket due to their entrenched performance in conditions where bowling attack is evolved from conventional to rather contemporary i.e. reverse swing,doosra etc..

  • on August 8, 2010, 14:04 GMT

    If Both Bat Together, It Will Give An End To Boring Test. Most Of Time The Opposition Team Will Get Tired When They Bowl To Both.

  • on August 9, 2010, 18:36 GMT

    yr assasment is vry good .both are great but gavaskar is don bradman is of idia cricket he install cofidence in coming generation by taking sigle handedly on great westendies sides.He is also voice of indian cricket.he raise his voice during 2008 sydney test for india.for this auusies insulted him by not asking him to present at podium during distribution of gavaskar border trophy,its only pity on australian.he is grest legend in indian mind will remain so cricket will going to played on this earth.

  • muski on August 9, 2010, 15:03 GMT

    Prasad- No wonder Dravid has still not got his due in Indian Cricket. We are looking at the entertainment value in Test Cricket rather than the " test" of cricketing skills. From what you say, Lalit Modis glitz and glamour tamasha is more suited for you. Iam sure you will get plenty of what you want there.

  • muski on August 9, 2010, 14:03 GMT

    Prasad- No wonder Dravid has still not got his due in Indian Cricket. We are looking at the entertainment value in Test Cricket rather than the " test" of cricketing skills. From what you say, Lalit Modis glitz and glamour tamasha is more suited for you. Iam sure you will get plenty of what you want there.

  • Kaze on August 9, 2010, 12:51 GMT

    To compare these two is like comparing chalk and cheese. If you look at Sehwags' record against McGrath you will see he failed miserably. He was dismissed 4 times in 5 Tests for an average of 8.50 (http://stats.cricinfo.com/ci/engine/player/35263.html?class=1;opposition=2;template=results;type=batting;view=bowler_summary) very similar for Steyn as well. Sehwag never faced Ambrose in Tests and I really wouldn't back him to even average 10 against the fast bowlers that Gavaskar faced. He slashes too much on off stump, which is fine on the subcontinent by elsewhere with a bit more bounce and it's slip catching practice.

  • on August 9, 2010, 12:36 GMT

    Indian score at the end of the first day will be 300 for no loss with Sehwag on 290 from 200 balls and Gavaskar on 10 from 340 balls.

  • muski on August 9, 2010, 11:20 GMT

    Abhishek- For God's sake dont make such sweeping statements. This is the kind of stand that kills sports in India. We did the same to number of sports person like Jaspal Rana, Narain Karthikeyan, Sania Mirza etc and by the the time this got to their head, they we no were in the scene. Yes- Sehwag can claim the greatness which you are now bestowing on him if he continues to perform in the same manner in the next 70 tests as he has done in his first 70 or 80 tests. Harsha must be having a good laugh at all our comparision Viv vs Lara, Viv vs Sunny, Sunny vs Sehwag, Tendulkar vs all of them etc. Its just good time pass and nothing else.@ sports scientist- you are right- most people do like sportsmen more from the heart and not from the head- thats why a Sania Mirza in her designer dress and awful tennis gets more fans than the world beater Siana Nehwal does. We cant help that can we?

  • on August 9, 2010, 5:35 GMT

    To say the least, Sehwag is the greatest batsman ever after Bradman.

  • muski on August 9, 2010, 4:58 GMT

    Sports Scientist- Now I get your point. There again I beg to differ. You cant compare Viv to Lara and vice versa. Its not Lara's fault that he played in the helmet area or in an era where the quality of fast bowling was not that great.However remember that Lara had to negotiate better quality spin than Sir Viv had to.By the time Viv was in his prime, the Indian quatret was in their last phase of their career. Lara has done all that he could to be counted among the best batsmen the game will ever see. @ Suresh Lalvani- You have hit the nail on its head. Having come from Gary's mouth, will anybody very dispute it. Yes- Imran still can if he wishes to!!!!!!

  • AmirBalouch on August 9, 2010, 4:14 GMT

    @cantwaittosee.. although Gav was a player of his time but comparing his last innings as a dream come true specially for legends as Bradman, Lara or even Tendulkar is like comparing apple to oranges. india also lost that game by 16 runs.. i would personally rather rate Tendulkar or Lara as the living legends of cricket due to their entrenched performance in conditions where bowling attack is evolved from conventional to rather contemporary i.e. reverse swing,doosra etc..

  • on August 8, 2010, 14:04 GMT

    If Both Bat Together, It Will Give An End To Boring Test. Most Of Time The Opposition Team Will Get Tired When They Bowl To Both.

  • rajpalprakash1 on August 8, 2010, 13:43 GMT

    Well there is no comparison of these two great batting legends. Gavaskar was equipped with the weapons like technique, patience, rock solid defence and style whereas sehwag has his won agression, timing, mentality and strike rate. I am a big sehwag fan as i believe that he has won many test matches for india. At the same time Gavaskar has saved many defeats for india. There is no comparision between these two openers as both have proved themselves in their own respective era.

  • Sportsscientist on August 8, 2010, 12:29 GMT

    this discussion is becoming irrelevant, & sidetracked. Gavaskar vs Viv, sachin, shewag etc... It's important to stick to the main points. People are getting emotional because they like a certain player. Viv was technically no way near boycott, gavaskar & lara.... DOES IT MATTER??? No.... Because what made him great was not technique. It was all about eye-hand co-ordination, bat speed, reflexes & imporvisation that made him. Even when he was defeated by a delivery his ability to adapt/adjust and play a shot into areas of the field that were not covered by a fielder. So stop getting emotional and comparing dogs with cats. With shewag he has some comparisons to viv i agree, with his attacking mindset & eye-hand co-ordination. But sunil opened up with help from any other indian bat. He had no tendulkar, VVS, Dravid etc....so he couldn't throw away his wicket. He scored runs when lillee,thommo, andy, holding, croft, clarke etc....tried to KILL opening bats..and wickets were truer also.

  • Jelanichem on August 8, 2010, 11:38 GMT

    Gentlemen, I do agree that Sehwag is the best of his time. I just say do not compare him with the greats of the past. I will give one simple example to illustrate my point. A couple years ago I had the privelege of watching an exhibition match in which a 50+ years former West Indian bowler from the four prong pace quartet of the 70s and 80s was one of the special guest players. A present day player, good but not with the numbers of Sehwag or Tendulkar, will refrain from name calling, was facing. He creamed the aged bowler for 2 fours the first two deliveries he faced and then the third boll he was off on a stretcher with a broken nose. I never heard him say it, but I was told that retired bowler had this to say, "and these are the good players in test cricket today". I rest my case. Tendulkar is the only present day player whose name can be called with the greats from all era.

  • alexindinuk on August 8, 2010, 11:20 GMT

    As someone who has been following cricket since 1974, I have to say that these 2 guys are the best openers India has had. When Sehwag was selected for the Australian tour in 2003, I predicted that he will not score more than 200 in the ENTIRE test series and that his test career would end at the end of the series. When he scored that 195 on Boxing day, I joined the list of converted! Sehwag has many records to his name and is genuinely a unique player. We use that word quite loosely in sport, but I cannot think of a test batsman, that too an opener, who has played test cricket like him. However Sunny Gavaskar remains the best test batsman India has ever produced, with due respect to G R Vishwanath, Vengsarkar, Tendulkar, Dravid and VVS. We all talk about his exploits against the Windies and Pakistani pacemen but what about that 96 in his last test innings against world class spinners on a pitch where the ball was spinning like a top! He was a one-man army in those days!

  • cantwaittosee on August 8, 2010, 5:08 GMT

    Sehwag is entertaining but Gavaskar's last test inning of 96 on minefield of a pitch will always be the greatest inning played. Everybody else from Bradman to Sobers to Lara to Tendulkar and everybody in between can only dream of playing such an inning. Those that saw that inning know what I am saying.

  • AZcricketfan on August 8, 2010, 4:56 GMT

    VK10,

    Andy Roberts rated Gavaskar's technique better than that of Boycott's in an interview on Cricinfo last year after that nancy Boycott objected to Dickie Bird's comments about Gavaskar.

    Also Gary Sobers rated Gavaskar as the best he had watched in an interview this year.

  • on August 8, 2010, 4:51 GMT

    I think Sehwag is greatest after the greatest man the god of cricket Sir Donald George Bradman. The great man is Sehwag whose simple and most dangerous plan is attack the boll and dismiss the bowlers mind. As result big innings and big scores made from his bat. Greatest runs per 100 bowls. and average better than Legend Of Cricket Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar. Another record of him is 5 of his 6 double centuries are in worlds fastest 10 centuries, isn't it amazing? if we calculate his average after try series in Australia, what does the result give? but we don't want to forget he gets hard to to play at next day whenever he plays big inning at day before. take the help of record given next. after the biggest inning from sehwags bat was 319 from which he made only 10 runs at last day. the match against ShriLanka was 287 at day before only 6 runs at day next.in most of the duble centuries same condition has been. So as result He is greatest for a day of test, isn't he?

  • on August 8, 2010, 4:36 GMT

    Gavaskar's last test innings of 96 in banglore on minefield of a pitch will always be the greates innings ever played. That one inning puts Gavaskar in the space that nobody can touch. Everybody else is just a baby. Those that saw that inning l know what I am saying.

  • siddham2007 on August 8, 2010, 4:26 GMT

    SMG SRT VS Gavaskar was my favourite cricketer simply because of his style of batting. SRT replaced him because he is all that plus the agression and the instinct. I havent seen enough of Sehwag.

  • on August 7, 2010, 23:46 GMT

    Garry Sobers rated Sunny Gavaskar ahead of Tendulkar, Lara, and Vivian Richards. Sunny played and mastered some of the greatest ever fast bowlers and he also played spin very well.

  • avis1001 on August 7, 2010, 21:52 GMT

    The difference is while SMG is batting, you can do all your work and just listen to the commentary on radio and when Sehwag is batting, you should sit in front of tv and enjoy the play and postpone all your work later - which may be after any minute, though I prefer later

  • AsherCA on August 7, 2010, 21:08 GMT

    I read a comment from someone about Sehwag being unable to score 120 off 300 balls - man if any batsman can score 280 off 300, asking for 120 instead would be daft.

  • mafiasam on August 7, 2010, 20:06 GMT

    Why do stupid people get into lame discussions everytime..My question was a rhetoric in case you stupid people dont understand.. Harsha, i have beena fan of your writing over the years, and this is yet another good article... Guys, give SMG and Viru a break and give a break to SRT as well.... as someone said in these comments, its easy to be an armchair critic..which all of us are since none of us played for our countries. Harsha is simply imagining what wud it be like to have SMG and Viru on the crease at the same time.. he is contrasting the styles not comparing them..(if you understand the difference).. i have never seen any SMG's innings coz i first started watchin cricket seriously in 1990.. but i have plenty of respect for that great, cozif other greats are praising him, i don't need to question his ability. If SMG has played against Windies quartet, then Viru has played against Murali, Warne and Mcgrath. And both of them have achieved their averages with their individual styles

  • on August 7, 2010, 19:48 GMT

    Garry Sobers rates Gavaskar higher than Tendulkar, Lara, and Vivian Richards. This is because of the higher quality of fast bowlers Gavaskar faced and mastered.

  • dilscoop on August 7, 2010, 17:28 GMT

    It was indeed very nostalgic to read about the original little master, the brown bradman - the one & only sunny. I have been following cricket from 1971 - had the opportunity (as an 8 year old) to see the 21 year old little master after his selection to the tour of WI in 1971 - he came to Guntur A.P. to play an exhibition match for the board XI captained by venkat vs SL (captained by Anura Tenekoon whom I saw on tv today during the presentations after india won) just before the WI tour - even saw sunny turn the arm over (medium pace). In these 40 years of following cricket - IMHO there was no better batsman technically (also stylish) than the great sunny (tendulkar included) . Sad there were no tv broadcasts in those days to watch some of the greatest knocks by sunny in the 70's. Had to be content with radio commentry of suresh sariya, pearson surita, berry sarbadikari & co.Sehwag is a viv richards clone - but technically sunny was the greatest of them all (no helmets, thinner bats..)

  • on August 7, 2010, 16:47 GMT

    Yeah. Sehwag will hit 100 in 40 balls... Gavaskar will hit 40 in 400 balls...

  • zeeiyer on August 7, 2010, 15:00 GMT

    Albert Einstein said that if you travel closer to the speed of light - then time itself dilates (t = t0/Sqrt (1-v**2/c**2). Sehwag applies that principle in cricket and by traveling at a strike rate of close to 100, he suddenly creates more time when none existed earlier for mere mortals, to go about and do their stuff. So if after significant statistical sampling, only 80 odd runs separate the 2 greats, then one has to give the nudge to Sehwag as the better batsman - given his ability to invent time. Gavaskar played for draws, since he compensated for the poor bowling attack and dead pitches - so while Gavaskar embodied the institution and the rules of Man, Sehwag's attitude is more innocent and Celestial. This is sport after all and the objective is to win. Although the real fun would have been to watch an innings where Gavaskar were also allowed to go berserk like he did during his 29th century. That would be akin to seeing Sachin/Sehwag on song - 2003 WorldCup game against Pak!

  • Sportsscientist on August 7, 2010, 13:50 GMT

    Muski - I will not go down that road with you with regards to viv richards and Gavaskar. 1st, as you should know viv was a middle order bat and sunil was a opening bat. they had different approaches, and everything else. viv was not even the most complete batsman technically in the west indies side....other players were technically better than viv.....that is not the point. I am of the opinion that you cannot compare opening bats to middle order players. I think you have missunderstood me and thought I was comparing Viv to Gavaskar. I made response related to the article. comparing Gavaskar to Shewag. So to clarify things lets compare viv (pre - helmet) to Lara (post - helmet)...who would you rate as better??? It's the same as Shewag & Gavaskar.Shewag & Lara are batting in the same envirnoment & Viv/Gavaskar shared the same conditions....Do you agree?? Now you can start making comparisons and assessing batsmen.

  • on August 7, 2010, 13:32 GMT

    @Muski And Jelanichem : Gavaskar certainly faced some of the best bowling attacks but look at the amount of cricket today's cricketer play, it does take toll on human body. also Sehwag had scored 100s on Lush Green Pitches of NZ which looked more like a rugby pitches modified for cricket.. What we call as Bare Pitch.. What you have to say abt it? Yes SMG is one of the greats so as Sehwag... But none of them had to handle the pressure and expectations like SRT has.. Sachin has done it all.. From facing bowlers like Waqar,Wasim, Mcgrath, Walsh, Ambrose to adopting to T20 cricket.. SRT is right on top and then on 2nd level below that u can have SMG or VS..

  • on August 7, 2010, 12:39 GMT

    @Jelanichem Its not sehwag's fault that he does not play much in bouncing tracks much. But if you see his performance on bouncy tracks then u will know he averages more in england, australia , newzealand than in india. He smashed australia for 195 runs in melbourne where whole team just scored like 330 runs. He scored century in his debut match in SA which has all good bowlers. He has performed best against best. Its easier to score runs on flat wickets but against pakistan he scored against shoaib akthar, sami which were 150 k/s plus and saqlin mustaq and his second 300 came against steyn, morkel , i doubt anybody can do it.

    You cannot compare sehwag with flat pitch bullies like sammerveera or jaywardene which scored millions in srilanka or flat pitches.

    Sehwag is best and anybody with some knowledge of cricket will tell you this. Currently sehwag is way ahead of all other players in world cricket, similar to sachin in 1990's or ponting in 2000-2006, its sehwag time baby.

  • sanjeevmukherjee2006 on August 7, 2010, 12:30 GMT

    for all those who think sehwag only flourishes in indian and subcontinental pitches, well you all are wrong his first test century was scored in his very test vs SA in SA, dont forget his 195 against Aus at melbourne, his century in england and a century in WI also his triple hundred in pakistan, he has scored runs in SL as well, so first check the stats, sehwag has scored runs all around the world

  • Daveptee on August 7, 2010, 12:12 GMT

    when we talk about facing fast bowling and middle order batsman,dont forget Mohinder Amarnath who was as good as any.

    I really wonder if an average player like Shastri would have gotten to play a single test match,let alone 80 + had he not been backed by Mumbai lobby.

  • on August 7, 2010, 12:07 GMT

    A man who has a class it self. But there is no common point in these two player

  • Crkt_Fan on August 7, 2010, 11:38 GMT

    Did somebody say that there many different ways of skinning a cat? Here you see two batsmen with two totally different approaches succeeding at the highest levels time and again. Now what would Sehwag do against those express bowlers of years past? The Sehwag method and attitude suggest that he would definetely take it to the bowlers. Since his debut in 2001 Sehwag has been putting astounding numbers at unimagined strike rate for an opening bat. Obviously the man has a plan and he is executing it with success. His methods and game plan are beyond the comprehension of armchair critics like us. So let us not go and disect his technique. Sehwag's method is See Ball Hit Ball. Wasn't that the great Sir Vivian's game plan? How technically sound was he? Genious will more often succedd.

  • NurseryEnd on August 7, 2010, 10:40 GMT

    agreed. harsha. both the batsmen you've talked about are rarities. if you add SRT to the list, you have three batsmen who could only be cloned but not imitated. Sehwag's hand-to-eye coordination is excellent - quite similar to what SRT's was, when he started off. SMG, however, was the master of batting technique (and not a slave to technique, as some other batsmen have been).

  • dr.jha on August 7, 2010, 10:30 GMT

    you know you are a very good player when the opposition captain puts plans to get you out , you oblige but only after a century...you know your are right there at the top.. make no mistake... all three.. smg , srt, sehwag... have been through this and come out on top...just ask australians... your fellow countrymen may rant about your greatness but when enemy does so.... you know you are not just good but you are in fact "great"... never saw mr. sunil manohar gavaskar bat... didn't even know how to tie my shoes when he retired... but he would have been a pleasure to watch for sure...

  • VK10 on August 7, 2010, 9:22 GMT

    @cricket_is_my_life, are you serious? India could draw a few tests (e.g. vs WI at Delhi and Chennai in '83), in part, only because Gavaskar hit a century in those. Also, Kallicharran's WI had Clarke at his peak. The pitches were mild but Clarke, at his peak, was as fast and as hostile as they ever came.

  • muski on August 7, 2010, 8:56 GMT

    @sports scientist- Dude I have been watching Test Cricket since 1978 . I dont deny what you say about the various other things which the batsmen of that era had to worry about apart from batting. Viv is certainly the most destructive batsmen the world has ever seen. However that does not make him a better test batsmen than Sunny. If I take your same argument about pitches, no helmets etc, our Original Little master wins hands down.Not to forget the fact that Sunny being an opener had to negotiate the intricacies of the new ball which Viv was not subjected to. Viv had at any point in his career at least 4 bowlers in the worlds top 10 in his team whose missiles he never ever had to face( except maybe when they played against each other in county cricket)

  • Jelanichem on August 7, 2010, 6:56 GMT

    Sehwag and Gavaskar in the same breath. This guy is not serious. Gavaskar has made runs against some of the most lethal bowling attacks, and not just on dead pitches in Asia. How can an all time great be compared against a man whos best away batting performance is against a pathetic WI bowling attack? He Sehwag is obviously the best of his time, when cricket has become a school girl sports with its dead pitches and weak bowling attacks. But to rank him with greats of yesteryears, is travesty. He is a batsman in the same mode as Chris Gayle, just that he is a bit more skillful, or is he really? From what I see of him batting, against a bowling attack of the mid seventies to mid eighties, when there was no bouncer regulation, I doubt if he would have average 10 in test cricket. Compare him with present day openers, but not the legends. That's blasphemy.

  • on August 7, 2010, 4:39 GMT

    Out of these two, Who won & saved more matches for India ?

  • smalishah84 on August 7, 2010, 4:22 GMT

    @ Mark00.....LOL........."gymnastics from Sehwag on Sri Lankan pitches"....LOL.....now that is funny. And imagine Gavaskar taking on Thomson and Lillee and the West Indian quartet on tough bowler friendly surfaces.

  • RaviIndianstar on August 7, 2010, 4:16 GMT

    sew is very aggressive and impressive batsmen i have ever seen in my fifteen years cricket history....before sew play i used to love gangully play and srikanth can be can be comparable......he(sew) used to say i dont mind balls and even the balls from the hands of best bowlers.....i just mind what i can do that gives him lot of courage and stamina towards his achievement.... ...............................................no one is comparable to sew's agression....

  • smalishah84 on August 7, 2010, 4:12 GMT

    @ VK10.......VK you can go and search "biography of Imran Khan in his own words" on youtube. It is broken down in 5 parts. You will find it in part 3 or part 4. In it you will find Imran Khan saying that Viv Richards and Sunny were the two batsmen whom he rated the highest. They even show Viv and Sunny talking about their time against the Pakistan side. Also Sunny only wore a floppy for about 4 years since he retired from cricket in 1987 so that is still saying a lot that he played for more than 10 years against express pace without a helmet and even when he could have chosen to in the late 1970s..........

    @muski............yeah nobody should really care what Imran had to say if he had been a mediocrity in his time. But frankly he was not. I am sure he knows a lot about cricket than a lot of people commenting on cricinfo. Besides if Gavaskar was rated so highly by some of the greatest cricketers so highly and some of his best peers then it only adds to the credibility of his greatness

  • ajohar on August 7, 2010, 3:19 GMT

    The difference between the two would be strike rate, Gavaskar at around 50 and Sehwag at 81. I guess that is all that has changed in the modern era,with shorter boundaries, flat pitches and very few good bowlers.

  • lucyferr on August 7, 2010, 1:46 GMT

    Hey, didn't your last column go on and on about how Pakistan were a team on the up? And I told you not to count your chickens till they'd won three Tests in a row? Well, just look at them now - lol! You lose, Harsha.

  • sub2010 on August 7, 2010, 0:40 GMT

    Shewag is more talented than SRT

  • BillyCC on August 6, 2010, 23:59 GMT

    Well said Bharath Kumar. It is difficult to compare generations and in the end, you can only play what's in front of you. Both Gavaskar and Sehwag are great batsman. Sehwag has in my mind emulated and exceeded the likes of other dominating opening batsman. As a result, you may well see that in future generations, opening batsman are copying Sehwag's style of solid defensive and blazing strokes. That is one aspect of greatness, being able to change the way the game is played. In the last twenty years, only a handful of people will be seen to have had such an impact: Gilchrist is at the top of the list, followed by the Sri Lankan ODI openers, Wasim and Waqar for their swing bowling improvements, Steve Waugh's drive for a result in Tests etc. Gavaskar displays another aspect of greatness from a completely different generation where bowling stocks were awesome and batting stocks were thin. And he stood tall in that generation. So it's very difficult to compare but greatness applies to both

  • Sportsscientist on August 6, 2010, 23:11 GMT

    I wonder how old muski, or sanks555 are??? and muski have you ever seen viv richards bat?? people compare the pre helmet era with the post helmet era with good cause. pitches were more true, and batsmen had less protection and had to think of their personal safety as well as how to protect their wicket and score runs.

  • CricIsCrazy on August 6, 2010, 22:27 GMT

    Both were very good! but Sehwag has (2) triples which is no mean feat. Had he got the third, which he nearly did, then that would be bettered the Don. It is not just that he got those runs its very impressive how he got them. Like how Samaraveera summed up " It looks a different pitch when he bats". That sir is Sehwag for you!

  • on August 6, 2010, 21:14 GMT

    sehwag is a special player he finds ways to get out just when u think that i think he has got a bit of brain too

  • waspsting on August 6, 2010, 21:07 GMT

    first off - title is misleading. why a comparison? - the article is all about the pair of them together. second off - if sehwag were facing what Gavaskar did - i doubt he'd average 40. However, NO ONE i have ever seen, including Viv Richards, could do some of the things I've seen Sehwag do. He needs conditions to be just so for that - but all the same, if it were easy, everyone would do it.

  • ShaanAgha1 on August 6, 2010, 20:07 GMT

    The two cannot be compared in class or in greatness; Sunny played in the era of bowlers with a few batsmen of his avg, today there are over a dozen batsmen with an avg over 50. Plus Viru's third and fourth inning avg is 31 and 28 to sunny's 48 and 58. To top it all up see the avg in Eng, NZ, S.A etc. When the ball is moving viru's technique betrays him and he can be characterized as a flat pitch bully. Sunny though was not as likable as Viru, he will remain to be far greater; not in the same league.

  • US_Indian on August 6, 2010, 20:00 GMT

    I had been fortunate enough to see SMG and VS, along with other openers.Farokh Engineer was the guy who started taking Mushtaq Ali's virtues of an opener (quote- this is what i heard from many older people who have seen him in action said) seriousy and K.Srikanth took it to the next level and VS has taken it to a few notches up and hopefully some one takes it further up. Sehwag is a great player-no doubt. But he is playing in much more condusive conditions than Gavaskar ever did. India has the best batting line up coupled with the team of coaches, technology and above all protection gears and so many batsmen freindly rules of the recent past and it is easier for him to take risk and play unarthodox cricket without too much pressure on him. To me Gavaskar is the greatest. A word of note i saw the four openers picked for all time india xi, im surprised no srikanth or mushtak Ali but siddhu is there, is that a joke or guys who put the list are insane......HAHAHA.Shastri/Manoj were bettr

  • on August 6, 2010, 19:48 GMT

    Sunil gavaskar was a great player during his time and is not fare to compare him with Sehwag. Sehwag is the most dangerous test player with good strike rate and average above 50. Its hard to choose between them. I feel both of them make a good opening pair.

  • Sandgroper61 on August 6, 2010, 19:37 GMT

    I love watching Sehwag bat - fantastic, entertaining. But - and no doubt this is a function of my age - I believe Gavaskar was the better player. I saw him facing Lillee and Co in Australia; on tv I saw him against the Windies. It's personal choice. I agree with Bogle on one thing, though - watching them bat together would be fun.

  • on August 6, 2010, 19:37 GMT

    There is no damn way you could compare Sehwag to Gavaskar. Sehwag is a great talent but doesn't care about current match situation, in short as he always says "I play my natural game". To me, Gavaskar is far better thinking cricketer than Sehwag. Again, Gavaskar gotta belong to "Master's" class and Sehwag in "Great's" class.

  • Vinit_Sharma_Singh on August 6, 2010, 19:28 GMT

    most pointless article ever.

  • Prash83 on August 6, 2010, 19:11 GMT

    people are saying in comments SRT is better than both of them..guys take a break.. SRT is God, but it does not mean there are not other players who cannot be discussed..the article is about sehwag and smg lets discuss that

  • intcamd on August 6, 2010, 19:03 GMT

    Rakesh Agr -

    "..........but gavaskar in my opinion is more technically correct than sehwag"

    that has to be the understatement of the decade. I hope you meant it as such!

  • intcamd on August 6, 2010, 18:51 GMT

    SMG is the best opener of alll time, in my view. I don't believe that the Trumpers, Hobbses, Sutcliffes, et al could have faced the WI pace barrage, or Lille/Thommo, Willis/Botham/Lever, or Hadlee, Imran/Sarfraz/Akram, and so on, and still scored that many runs. And this generation, batting w/o a helmet, anad against that quality, forget it. Bowling against the weakings of today, a hacker like McGrath became a world beater. In the 70's, he would have been 12th man to Lillee et al, in that Australian lineup.

    Anyway, as others said, Sehwag is alright for today, but he is no SMG. No one is.

    As Obama stands on the shoulders of MLK and other civil rights heroes, the current generation of Indian cricketers have so much to thank SMG in particular. Today, the BCCI is able to tell the ICC to buzz off, and the ICC comes begging. Back then, Indian cricketers got zero respect, and were treated like dirt by England/Australia (many of whom still bear grudge against SMG for standing up back the

  • anilkp on August 6, 2010, 18:47 GMT

    Most of your previous articles, Harsha, look scholarly; and we the readers expect that from you--especially on Cricinfo. The kind of dream situation you visualized here is a too common dream in the minds of most cricket fans; and thus it is neither scholarly nor novel. We want to read and assimilate something new. I too wonder how would it feel to see Imran and Aamer bowl in tandem, Sir WG and SRT bat together. There is nothing novelty here; only a sheer wastage of time--yours and others'. We expect much--much better from you.

  • CanTHeeRava on August 6, 2010, 18:37 GMT

    Sehwag, self admittedly is a middle order batsman. He clicked as an opening batsman because it was his only chance to bat for India (Courtesy: Anil Kumble, Australia tour 2007-08). He attacked and succeeded. Gavaskar, Vishwanath, Tendulkar, and Dravid (batting at various positions) have (had) faced better bowling attacks in their prime on better bowling tracks. Sehwag, in a recent Cricinfo inteview said that he is eying the number 4 spot (after Tendulkar retires) in the Indian test team. He thinks it is very easy scoring runs in the middle order. Probably for him, batting at any position is easy because he is uni-dimensional. As the Srilankan's almost did in the ongoing test series, other teams will work out his weaknesses. I would be keen to see how he would come back from a bad path (on better tracks), because they are inevitable in cricket.

    Before I forget, I must add that he has the best credentials to be the vice captain (not the captain) of any team.

  • cricPassion2009 on August 6, 2010, 18:23 GMT

    Sehwag has 2 triple centuries. Has hunger for runs, and child-like eagerness to perform. He cannot change "colors" and play "mind games" like Sunny did. In most tests that Sehwag has played he immediately put India on upperhand and made things easier for other batsmen. He is responsible for India reaching #1 in test cricket.

    Sunny bored you to death, but he was reliable. The opposition teams of his generations rated Amarnath equally or higher ( he was called the best player of pace ). Vishy was another one whose tons led to victories.

    Indeed, two great players of different era, and it's absurd to compare them and their styles.

  • on August 6, 2010, 18:02 GMT

    The end of your article says they are separated by mere 88 runs at the same point in their career but their strike rates would be way apart. As you started, I would to like to end that its not possible to compare the two as they were greats in different aspects as you have explained.

  • on August 6, 2010, 17:38 GMT

    I don't see a reason why cricketers can be compared with generations. If you had the dreaded fast bowlers and the nothing protection of the last generation, you have the technology and the modernization of the game for the concurrent players. It is still a battle between between the ball and the bat in its essence. Every cricketer in the world agrees to the point, cricket is more of a mental game. Expectations create pressure, and the modern world pressure is plethora!! So are modern cricketers great or the older ones the best. Both are good in their own regard and the comparing yardsticks are the ones that count and tilts the balance to its favor!

  • Sanks555 on August 6, 2010, 17:29 GMT

    Sehwag is undoubtedly more talented than Gavaskar. But Gavaskar used his head a lot better and, hence, was overall the superior player. Sehwag does not know and does not want to know how to change his batting style, when required, and hang around. Inability cannot be a virtue. Viv Richards could defend as well as anybody when required.

    Gavaskar on the other improved his strike rate considerably, at least in ODIs. When he finished his ODI career he had a SR of 62.3. In comparision Sourav Ganguly had a strike rate of around 73. I think that the average difference in average strike rate between the era of Gavaskar and Ganguly would have been 10. This is good progress from a man who scored 36 from 174 balls on a batsmen-friendly pitch.

  • nafzak on August 6, 2010, 16:58 GMT

    I'll take Gavaskar over Sehwag any day. We are talking about different eras here. One day cricket was in it's infancy in Gavaskar's time and for most of his career, the helmet and all those arm/elbow/thigh pads etc., were unheard of.

    Gavaskar handled the fast men pretty darn well and scored lots of runs on many less than friendly to batsmen wickets. Sehwan and indeed all Indian and Sr iLankan batsmen are constantly playing on made for batting wickets.

    For the record, I am West Indian and as the calypso said, Gavaskar was a master, he was like a brick wall, teh West indies couldn't out Gavaskar at all.

  • on August 6, 2010, 16:54 GMT

    One scored 36 in 60 overs and the other keeps scoring at the rate of 36 twice in 60 balls even in tests.

  • anObserver on August 6, 2010, 16:44 GMT

    Uncomparable but still a probability of some kind of intersection is there between the two giants of the world cricket Gavaskar, the lion who in his days gave shudders to many and Sehwag whose presence on the crease is enough to dislodge any bowler, the cheetah of Indian team. Sehwag is fast and studious where as Gavaskar was slow and hard as a rock. Styles different altogether but still there is something which still lies in common, the team, the passion and quite unrealistically but the averages and runs.So apart from statistics can the cheetah and the lion brought together a common attack what will be the result. I am still in disdain what will be the fate of opposition but I am certain that if Sehwag gets going and Gavaskar supports him than it will be nightmare for the opposition and some of the classics of the international cricket would be born with the two kinds of species hunting for a prey together in the form of a team which is as unrealistic and impossible as I think.

  • pankajkumarsingh on August 6, 2010, 16:09 GMT

    It is rediculous to say Gavaskar was better than Tendulkar. Except for the fact that Gavaskar has faced better fast bowling, Gavaskar is, I think a shade behind Tendulkar. Mind you, in no way, I am demeaning Gavaskar. He was one of the best ever the game has produced. Gavaskar was technically brilliant and so is Sachin. What separates apart is - Sachin has won a lot more games than Gavaskar and scoring more runs than him. Sachin has played the best spinners the game has produced. Coming back to Sunny vs Sehwag - what is one thing that no one brought up is Sehwag averages less that 40 outside the subcontinent whereas Sunny has 50+. Sunny in fact is only one of 3 batsman on the subcontinent (along with Sachin, ofcourse) who averages more than 50 outside the subcontinent. For me Sunny was like "I dare you, get my wicket". Sehwag/Sachin are like "You're dead, Mr. Bowler".

  • on August 6, 2010, 15:59 GMT

    Only the perfect blend of ingredients to make that tangy sauce. Great as both players are, you cannot compare them with the intention of belittling either. Forget conditions, opposition attacks and statistics; just for the sheer joy of watching cricket, both should be batting at different ends at the same time somehow like a TV screen split into two and showing two channels at the same time.

    Somehow, the character of the sportsmen in question seem to emulate the general attitude of the country in the ear they were playing. Moreover it also signifies where the center of power of Indian cricket has moved to in 30 years.

    I love the Mumbai-Delhi combination at the top of this XI.

  • bismoy on August 6, 2010, 15:57 GMT

    Again looking at the comment you see baised comment against sachin,let put thing correctly. gavaskar- scored tons of runs againt westindies but he never faced all 4 westindies bowler together at his prime.its a fact but no body knows i guess...

    shewag-scored heap of runs against low class bowling in asian condition ,when most of the top fast bowler stopped playing..

    dravid-scored heap and heap of runs but,he never a threat to murli,warne or mcgrath,infact dravid regulary fails against decent spinner -last 2 sl series exposed him badly with avg of 20 and 19.

    lastly, sachin purely the best batman one can ever see playing the game with no apparent weakness.....played the best bowlers in there peak wasim akram,waqar younis,saqlain ,murli,warne,macgrath,donald,pollock and still had great avg of 58 before injury struck in 2000 but still today avg 56 in test, more than any so called indian batting legends. Lastly not for nothing bradman consider sachin as his replica not a gavaskar

  • pradeep_dealwis on August 6, 2010, 15:15 GMT

    two great batsman...or rather one great one and one very talented and entertaining one...if Sehwag stated his career a decade earlier he'd still have been amazing to watch..but without bats that aren't a mile wide and deep, and pitches as flat as an ironing board and against Wasim , Donald, Waqar, Mcgrath, Ambrose, Walsh and Murali and Warne at their best his average would have been in the low 40s. Still very good mind you.

  • RSKIndore on August 6, 2010, 14:57 GMT

    Ironic and perhaps influenced by what we all see coming : Rahul WAS !!

    RSK

    Gavaskar was the classical old-school batsman, body right behind the line of the ball, bat straight as a well-constructed wall (Rahul Dravid was version 2.0).

  • cricket_is_my_life on August 6, 2010, 14:13 GMT

    It is true that Gavaskar had to bat against so many fast bowlers and it is of great courage that he did that without a helmet. But how much success he got really? Consider his 13 centuries against West Indies - 8 of them were scored against weak WI bowling (his debut series and the 78-79 Kalicharan series), 1 of them was scored on a flat track (Delhi, 1983), 1 of them in dead rubber (Chennai, 1984) and 1 in a dead test (Georgetown, 1983). Only 2 of his centuries against in the 1975-76 series in Port of Spain are truly meaningful knocks. Yes, he faced Imran and Co. in the 78-79 and 82-83 series. But could he save any test? Yes, he faced Lilee and Co. in 1980-81. But did he succeed at all? So, Gavaskar's success against fast bowlers is a myth. In hisera, Miandad did not get that much recognition as Gavaskar but he saved more matches for Pakistan than Gavaskar did for India. Among Indians, Dravid saved and won more matches than Gavaskar. Sehwag will be called great if he scores in SA.

  • NISH67 on August 6, 2010, 13:55 GMT

    As a young Sri Lankan school boy domiciled in India in the 70"s I had the good fortune to watch Sunny in his pomp in the flesh and let me tell you it was an education by itself and he was the signal factor in my obsession with the game which has lasted over 35 years and counting . I alway rated Sunny a cut above the rest as a fearless opening batsman who took on the might of the West Indies fast bowlers and carved out 13 centuries against them - a tally which some fail to match over an entire career . Imran is entitled to his views just as we all are but the great west Indian teams of the 70"s and 80"s rated no one higher than Sunny and that's the bottomline . Sehwag is a free spirit and a joy to watch when in full flow and long may he continue his bucaneering ways at the crease - Each to his own as they say and Sunny and Sehwag , although as different from chalk and cheese in their methods have both made India proud and world cricket richer by their exploits !

  • Mark00 on August 6, 2010, 13:52 GMT

    Bogle's finally lost it. Sehwag's performing gymnastics to evade Malinga's 85mph bouncers on Sri Lankan pitches. How the heck would he have handled Lillee and Thomson at Perth? Marshall, Holding, Garner, and Croft at Sabina Park?

  • VIJAYAKUMAR.C on August 6, 2010, 13:51 GMT

    Truly a superb imagination!!! Both Gavaskar and Sehwag are legends of the game. Both are successful because they played their respective natural games-Sunil more on his solid technique and Viru on his aggressive pyrotechniques. I still remember Sunil's last innings at Bangalore in 1987 against Pakistan on a pitch turning square where he made 96 runs. What an exhibition of technique, determination and character!!! Though it was a heartbreak for the Indian fans as India lost that Test match very narrowly (very much similar to Sachin's special-1999 Test at Chennai against the same archrival), the game will be ever-remembered for that Gavaskar's classic. Similarly, Viru backing up his aggressive instincts set the platform for an improbable victory against England at the same Chennai venue couple of years back where Sachin and Yuvi signed the match off in style. But for Viru's innings, India could not have gone for the win in that match. We, Indians, are indeed proud of our Sunil and Viru.

  • sukankumar on August 6, 2010, 13:38 GMT

    To us who have had the fortune of watching / following Gavaskar and today Schewag, i will definitely cherish Gavaskar was purely great. He could play defensive as well as he can play all the shots in the book when wanted. He adopated so nicelly to the requiremen of modern oneday cricket in the late years. It was possible only because he was supremely great in technique (we can compare only Dravid / sachin on this ground with SMG). But with Schewag, its more of hand and eye (please note foot not involved) coordination. But this is not to belittle Viru

  • muski on August 6, 2010, 13:32 GMT

    Its an insult to Sehwag to compare him to Srikant. True that Srikant was one of his kind in those days.However his mediocrity pales in comparison to what Sehwag has achieved. By the way who is worried about whom Imran rates as a better cricketer. I bet Sunny was a better Test Batsman than Sir Viv - technique, statistics, run scored whatever. For God's sake dont tell us Boycott was better than Sunny- you can if you are an Englishmen. Why do we compare pre helmet and post helmet eras. Its like saying, Thomas Edision or Issac Newtorn would have discovered or Invented much more if they were alive in today's more technologically advanced world. Isnt this mere hypothesis?

  • K.A.K on August 6, 2010, 13:10 GMT

    Sehwag is a great player. No doubt he is playing in much more condusive conditions than Gavaskar ever did. India has the best batting line up and it is easier for him to take risk and play unarthodox cricket without too much pressure on him.

    To me Gavaskar is one of the greatest of his era and his contribution to cricket as a whole is tremendous. As someone said, it is difficult to compare players that played in two diffrent cnturies.

  • spinkingKK on August 6, 2010, 13:08 GMT

    Sehwag is, no doubt, one the greatest batsmen of the modern cricket. However, modern cricket does not have the bowlers like Marshal, Roberts, Imran Khan, Akram, Hadlee, Botham etc etc. Also, the moden pitches are featherbeds. Even the most fearsome pitches like MCG, WACA and Gabba have became batting friendly. So, batting is a lot easier. If the mind is right, you can make a lots of runs. Therefore, I think the modern batsmen's average should be reduced by 15 points to equal that of Gavaskar's era. That will bring Sehwag's average close to that of Srikanth's. But, that is only theory. In practice, one has to put Sehwag as the greatest opener, because of his average and run aggregate together with his strike rate. I am a big fan of Sehwag, don't get me wrong. I was also a fan of Gavaskar in his late playing days when I saw him playing. Like the writer of this article, I appreciated both styles and they both performed their duties perfectly. Let's enjoy Sehwag while he is there.

  • lucyferr on August 6, 2010, 12:58 GMT

    Oh please. If Gavaskar was to somehow be reincarnated to play cricket today, he sure as hell wouldn't get into the national team in the forms of cricket that matter. And that's allowing for him to grow up in a cricket culture where the wicket isn't prized so much. Sure, he might get into the Test side, but who - other than pundits and fans over 40 and Englishmen with a public school education - cares about Test cricket?

  • on August 6, 2010, 12:40 GMT

    Admittedly Sehwag has had the luxury of a far more settled batting line up, a middle order of the greats of indian cricket who have over 500 tests between them. But leaving it at that is a disservice to players like Vengesarkar, Mankad, Wadekar and the likes (you already mention Vishwanath). let's be reasonable; it is hardly Sehwag's fault. And also lets face it: it would hardly have made a difference to him anyway.

  • Cricket__sri on August 6, 2010, 12:25 GMT

    very wonderful article...Viru is best in this era nd sunny,the best in his era nd both are all-time gr8 openers.

  • Daveptee on August 6, 2010, 12:15 GMT

    These comparisons and talk of all time XIs is irrelevant and hypothetical.It is just for armchair critics and writers who have the time to engage in such discussions. Every era,its challenges and conditions are different and unique.What I have noticed is that while former players are also sometimes called on to pick thse world XIs,Asia XIs ,they never waste their breath over writing such articles.

    As a reminder,it is pathetic and shameful for Indian selection committee as well as the media including Bhogle to ignore the claims of a class player like Pujara who would have been an ideal choice for the test squad especially when he would have most of the oportunity by being an understudy to the liked of Tendulkar,Dravid,Sehwag and Laxman !Only if he were a blue eyed boy like Murali Vijay,Dinesh Karthik or Yuvraj !

  • on August 6, 2010, 11:41 GMT

    There are lies, damned lies and then there are statistics!! Sehwag is a wonderrful player. He however is no Sunny just because his average is similar. When Sunny was playing: The definition of India in a crisis was that Gavaskar was out. There was no middle order. The batting line up was Gavaskar, Viswanath and the tail. He was not guarding the family heirloom. He was a father with starving kids at home working long hours so the family could eat that night. Pardon me that he was not flamboyantly throwing away Rupees at the multiplex. Sehwag has had a lineup of Sachin, Rahul, Laxman and Ganguly who could clean up if ever there was a mess when he got out early. Batting is infinitesimally easier when the hopes of a team and a nation are not hanging on each of your stroke. Paul Newman and Forest Whitaker have the same number of Oscars: does not make both of them equal or comparable.

  • on August 6, 2010, 11:10 GMT

    We are beginning to talk about Sehwag in terms of greatness now. In itself that is an achievement few attacking batsmen have managed. And this man has actually proved himself to befar more devastating in test cricket (arguably) than in one day cricket. He is a revolutionary in the same sense Gilchrist was - only difference being that no one has even dared to try and emulate him.

  • on August 6, 2010, 9:44 GMT

    not only sehwag and gavaskar...for me it is little immaterial to compare players of two different eras....but generally batsmen of this era are very lucky in that they dont need to face ambrose or walsh or donald or malcolm mashall..........but gavaskar in my opinion is more technically correct than sehwag

  • on August 6, 2010, 9:05 GMT

    not to forget them days field setting used to be attacking where chips-chops used to grab 3-4 runs, now days captains n bowlers are prepared thru technology n study each n every batsman n the field setting is more to thier style of play and defensive where scoring runs harder in modern test matches.. cant argue with the technique gavaskar far most superior

  • Percy_Fender on August 6, 2010, 8:57 GMT

    Kris Srikkanth used to be Gavaskar's opening partner for a fair part of his career. In terms of belligerance and attacking batsmanship, there was a similarity between Srikanth and Sehwag, even if Srikanth it seemed,did not have the ability to sustain the attacking mode over long period periods of time such as Viru has shown us time after time.But I have watched on occasions Gavaskar getting to his landmarks quicker ! Sehwag is as someone rightly said, is the closest anyone has got to Viv Richards in terms of sheer daring and fearlessness of whosoever was bowling. He may not have had Sir Viv's range of strokes or for that matter the unmistakable hubris, but Viru too commands a fear from the opposition even if a tad grudgingly. That is because he comes from Najafgarh which is probably better known for wrestlers than a champion cricketer. If Sehwag had been from West Indies, they would have hailed him as the next Richards or Lara. Virender Sehwag will ever remain the most unsung legend.

  • chinamen on August 6, 2010, 8:51 GMT

    Nice imagination. But don't you think that we have actually seen a similar combination ie when Sunny used to open with Kris Srikant ! Kris was in the same cavalier mould , just recall the incidence against England when he was doing a bit of gardening , even when the ball was still in play and was runout ! In fact Sunny got more adventures in his company GOd knows what will happen when Viru opens with him. God save the poor bowlers .

  • on August 6, 2010, 7:54 GMT

    The pairing is logical when you think about it. Sehwag would perform the role that Kris Srikkanth did, and last a whole lot longer.

  • cricfanraj on August 6, 2010, 7:51 GMT

    Though Gavaskar & Sehwag will be idle pair to have at the top, I still think Sehwag is not tested with Quality fast bowling or good swing bowling. I think it would be a great contest to watch when at least two top class bowlers against him on helping conditions to bowlers . If he can get over it he would be certainly great player. Never the less he is a great asset to current indian team and may be one of the primary reasons why India is winning more tests. THis would be All time great opening pair for India for sure

  • VK10 on August 6, 2010, 7:43 GMT

    @smalishah84 Gavaskar is all-time great but to put it in perspective: (i) Imran rated Viv Richards and Greg Chappell (not Gavaskar) as the two best batsmen of his time even though, according to him, Gavaskar could organize his innings better than anybody. (ii) I believe Imran rated the technique of Boycott to be better than Gavaskar's. (iii) Even though Gavaskar did not wear a helmet, he began to wear a scull cap '83 onwards after a Marshall bouncer struck him on bare head. Helmets became commonplace '79 onwards only. So, SMG played "helmetless" for only 4 years, during which he encountered express pace in only 3 series (14 tests): Lillee in '80, Imran in '82, and WI in '82-'83.

  • smalishah84 on August 6, 2010, 7:38 GMT

    @ RogerC............Roger if you notice I have mentioned Gavaskar in the light of test matches and not one day internationals. By most accounts Gavaskar was a very slow scoring ODI player even by the ODI standards of his playing days. However my comments (and also I believe of Imran Khan) pertain to Test match cricket. And if you see it is actually test match cricket that shows the true class of a cricketer. ODI is more of a chance game what to say of T20.

  • Vivek7 on August 6, 2010, 7:29 GMT

    let the good old commentator harsha bhogle be told/ reminded that gavaskar started as a batsman like sehwag. but due to the conditions and depth of batting in india and fast bowling menace that was the norm of those days he had to tone down his pace to be a more responsible batsman.

    please dont forget srikanth who walked into open the indian batting is an explosive striker of the ball. in those days srikanth and kapil dev provided the drama sehwag, yuvraj provides these days.

  • Sridhu on August 6, 2010, 7:22 GMT

    Another point of view which seems to have eluded most people - Sunny is not a plodder by 'design'. He was a tearaway who curbed his natural instincts to be the safe opener. His 772 debut & the last 15-20 matches when he was 'enjoying' himself showed us the true Gavaksar. So, Gavaskar in full flow & Sehwag being Sehwag may actually be more destructive than Greenidge & Haynes or Hayden-Gilchrist

    (I was a Vishy fan throughout though! The dream pairing for me would be Vishy & Ganguly at the crease!)

  • on August 6, 2010, 7:19 GMT

    @arsalakhan pathan..whatever it is...get your facts right..sehwag has scored eveywhere in the world..all kinds of pitches..all oppositions..he is really one of a kind...

  • chaithan on August 6, 2010, 7:16 GMT

    @cricxpert89: You call yourself an expert?! The day SRT opens tests for India will be the day we plunge to the middle of the rankings. As it is, we are just hanging on to the top spot, in small measure due to Sehwag. Anyway there is definitely one area where Tendulkar is nothing next to Gavaskar, Dravid or Sehwag and that is in performance under pressure. Tendulkar just wilts away when there is little pressure.

  • Sridhu on August 6, 2010, 7:16 GMT

    Another point of view which seems to have eluded most people - Sunny is not a plodder by 'design'. He was a tearaway who curbed his natural instincts to be the safe opener. His 772 debut & the last 15-20 matches when he was 'enjoying' himself showed us the true Gavaksar. So, Gavaskar in full flow & Sehwag being Sehwag may actually be more destructive than Greenidge & Haynes or Hayden-Gilchrist

    (I was a Vishy fan throughout though! The dream pairing for me would be Vishy & Ganguly at the crease!)

  • floydianechoes on August 6, 2010, 7:16 GMT

    Lovely piece harsha..you captured the moment of two heroes poles apart with absolute brilliance. i too have many such wild imaginations including a hypothetical subcontinental team of all times. "it is about doing things as you know best" rightly summed up harsha. kudos

  • on August 6, 2010, 7:12 GMT

    The comparison aptly stops with the last paragraph.. hard to imagine Viru facing likes of Marshall, Garner, Botham etc.. and Sunny facing Warne, Murali, McGrath etc..

  • hattima on August 6, 2010, 7:11 GMT

    It might be like the Gavaskar-Srikanth (how many t's nowadays?) partnerships, only with a far better batsman. I have little doubt they would have immensly enjoyed playing with each other; Sehwag would have had all the strikes he wanted and Gavaskar would have finally had someone as a partner who would not be back to the pavillion before he blinked. Although Sehwag might have had his ears boxed once or twice mid-pitch!

  • amieka on August 6, 2010, 7:10 GMT

    There is no dubt that Sewag is a good cricketer in his own rights. It's also true that he is one of those cricketers who got benifited hugely by flat track cricket that we had seen in the last few decades. When pitch assist the bowler.....and about Sunny, what a cricketer ..one of the finest of all time. To be able to perform - constantly against the mighty west indies ..wow..

  • VK10 on August 6, 2010, 7:02 GMT

    SMG and Sehwag compare well not only on stats but on their role in the evolution also. SMG was the first Indian opener to churn out 50's and 100's with great consistency. Sehwag is the first attacking Indian opener to churn out 50's and 100's with great consistency. The difference is that while SMG could pull a Sehwag at times (124 & 90 vs WI '83 and a few ODI's '86-'87), it is unclear/inconceivable if Sehwag can score a rock-solid 120 off 300 deliveries like SMG. At any rate, Sehwag is arguably the best opener of the last 20 years.

  • step2more on August 6, 2010, 7:01 GMT

    As much as I respect Gavaskar for who he is, we could not make them bat in same match. Gavaskar will lose his cool watching Sehwag throwing away his wicket at 99. On the other hand, Sehwag would have made himself runout as he could not have taken that much pain for watching boring cricket of Gavaskar for eating up too much ball without scoring.

    Of course it is my joke. I would have loved to see each other's reaction when played together more than what their own game.

  • on August 6, 2010, 6:52 GMT

    Gavaskar played against the most Lethal attacks without any protection - Sehwag just chops it on pitches like the SSC! Massive difference. Gavaskar is oceans apart!

  • on August 6, 2010, 6:40 GMT

    Brilliant Harsha !! The stats at the bottom of the article were the icing on the cake...

  • harmanpartap on August 6, 2010, 6:37 GMT

    I read your Article in the Indian Express this morning and was delighted reading the same.I couldnt agree more if there could have been a better opening pair than Sehwag and Gavaskar.And the fact that the amount of runs they both have scored in the same no. of matches are almost the same , doesnt stop to amaze me! Keep Writing!

  • cricxpert89 on August 6, 2010, 6:34 GMT

    I Think if tendulkar would open regularly for a long time(with any partner probably Sourav) then he would be faaaaaaar more better than both of these. For me the best All time opening pair for india could be Ganguly + Tendulkar (If they had open the batting in past as in ODIs)

  • RowdyDave on August 6, 2010, 6:28 GMT

    India is blessed to have had two such champions. Nether is as good as Sachin, of course, but Gavaskar and Sehweg are two of my all time favourites.

  • on August 6, 2010, 6:13 GMT

    Well Harsha...Dat might b amazing 2 c both bat together... Virender Sehwag is often noted for his extremely attacking style of batting While Gavaskar could not be described as an attacking batsman, he had the ability of keeping the scoreboard ticking with unique shots such as the "late flick". His focus of technical correctness over flair meant that his style of play was usually less suited to the shorter form of the game, at which he had less success. Previously Viru was known predominantly as an offside player, with a weakness against straight short pitched bowling unlike Sunny..... Sunny used to play nice defensive whereas Viru plays his natural game... But if u compare the two era's test cricket so they are better at their own places.... Sunny n Viru bat together in the same era is ridiculous to think.... Isn't it Harsha...??

  • Vindaliew on August 6, 2010, 5:52 GMT

    Sehwag is probably the closest thing to a Viv Richards in modern times. The impish cavalier replacing the regal conqueror in sowing dread in the hearts of all men who dare to bowl at them!

  • akhilhp on August 6, 2010, 5:28 GMT

    I think the Last line sums it up : it is about doing things as you know best. We may argue on comparing Sunny and Viru but the bottom line is they both have success in their respective era so it message to us all working in different fields : it is not how things are done... but is which way of doing things you know is best for you .. do it that way success will surely come.

  • TheOnlyEmperor on August 6, 2010, 5:26 GMT

    contd 2... SMG was responsible for a lot of reform within Indian cricket. At a time when people used to suck up to the BCCI, he fought to ensure that Indian players were treated right, right from daily allowances to laundry allowances while on trips. Indian players were payed a pittance. In the 70s, exhibition matches were organised to raise money for ex-players, to help tide difficulties. That was Indian cricket. He wd have been a great asset for the ICC too, but he was too outspoken for comfort. Speed pushed him out of the ICC after SMG questioned Ricky's integrity live on TV when he claimed that catch during that controversial tour. The "conflict of interest" was just a ruse. I still remember how he pointed out the "deliberate insult" at Lords when both, he and Bedi were asked for identity proof by a steward, when invited there. He spoke about the modus operandi of how the establishment got a lower official to insult and then apologised after the fact. A real inspirational hero!

  • AB99 on August 6, 2010, 5:25 GMT

    Good article and Sunil and Sehwag would be complimenting each other. Viru is a better bet than Sunny's fvourite partner Kris Srikanth would ever be. However, I think it would like to have a comparison between Viru and Sir Viv Richards - which is more appropriate ... can Harsha write on this or better request Sunny to write on it

  • on August 6, 2010, 5:14 GMT

    Well never got to see Gavaskar play, So my generation will never understand him.. Maybe as you said .. Rahul dravid is Gavaskar 2.0 . And they are biggest challenge for any bolwer in world... But to call Sehwag as Tendulkar 2.0 will be an understatement .. All are different players .. Hard to compare But sehwag truly makes me watch test cricket .. He is real maverick to core. Hail Sehwag

  • RogerC on August 6, 2010, 5:12 GMT

    @ smalishah84: There is no doubt that Gavaskar is a better batsman than Sachin or Sehwag. I have watched Gavaskar and Sachin and say this without any prejudice. The only negative thing about Gavaskar was that he took the law in his hand at times. Sachin would have never batted for 60 overs in a ODI and scored 36 not out because there he thought that there was no chance of winning.

  • on August 6, 2010, 5:07 GMT

    Who won & saved more matches for India ?????

  • TheOnlyEmperor on August 6, 2010, 4:53 GMT

    It's amazing how the people who haven't really see SMG play, base their perceptions on the basis of the 36no innings in the WC in 1975. I for one, have actually seen him play since 1972 and found him reasonably quick scoring... in an era when people just about bowled 70 odd overs a day with long run ups, plenty of bouncers aimed at helmetless batsmen. Watching SRT fish outside the offstump to Malinga is laughable compared to the 5 slips anf gully placed by the bowlers those days. SMG's off drives were a treat to watch and he batted fearlessly (as against recklessly). All one has to do is to compare his centuries against the awesome WI as compared to any other batsman. SMG was far far more mentally strong than Dravid. SRT is a pale shadow in that department under pressure. SMG was unfortunate to have a lot of colleagues and ex-cricket officials who were plain envious of his achievements.The way the North lobby used politics to play Kapil against SMG was disgraceful.

  • ganeshram78 on August 6, 2010, 4:52 GMT

    gavaskar and srikkanth played together for a fair bit of time. it was as good watching them. remember 1987 chennai test against pak. imran and akram taken apart. 200 run opening partnership at 4 runs an over. cheeka scored 123 and gavaskar got 96 if i remember right.

  • karthik246 on August 6, 2010, 4:50 GMT

    Wonderful Article, went emotional after reading about these two greats... Thx, Harsha for letting me to spend a fab time...

  • Kunal-Talgeri on August 6, 2010, 4:45 GMT

    In the past decade, I have become less and less of a Tendulkar fan. But credit to him, he has been an amalgam of Gavaskar and the post-2007 Sehwag. It is possible to look at Tendulkar's career until 1999 as the Sehwag-mode, and the latter phase as the Gavaskar-mode. For example, it is hard to see Sachin throw it away while batting on 99 or 195. Occasionally, since 2008, Tendulkar switches between both styles. Whether one agrees or disagrees, we can appreciate how Indian batting has been stimulating. Where Gavaskar stands head and shoulders above the next-gen is temperament.

  • dr_sachinfan_chennai on August 6, 2010, 4:34 GMT

    Wonderful insightful article Harsha sir. Hope atleast in Cricinfo's All Time XI for India will protract such a combo. Ultimate end of spectrums. Its worth watching. As for Sach-Viru combo one needs to remember the only batsman who can play in Viru mode with less risks, Gavaskar-Dravid mode without risk or in middle of the two - I mean in anyways in Team India or for that matter in whole world is SACHIN TENDULKAR..

  • smalishah84 on August 6, 2010, 4:14 GMT

    As far as test cricket I am sure Gavaskar is much much better a batsman than Sehwag. Although even I am surprised that the difference between their average is so little. But how can you compare Sehwag with Gavaskar??? Sachin perhaps but I am not sure Sehwag is in the same class. The quality of fast bowling in the 1980s was much higher than it is today and Gavaskar used to negotiate them all (people like Marshall, Akram, Garner, Lillee, Thomson, Croft, Imran Khan etc) without a helmet. NOW that is something. Hailing from Pakistan I have seen Imran Khan on TV many times saying that Richards and Gavaskar were the 2 best batsman that he ever bowled to. Even to this day Imran argues that Gavaskar was better than Tendulkar in Test matches and in Imran's views there was no one in world cricket with better defense or a better defensive technique or a better pacer of a test innings than Gavaskar. High praise indeed and that too coming from a man who does not praise too many too often.

  • PandyaHimanshu on August 6, 2010, 4:10 GMT

    Good comparasion. Both are great in their respective times. However in today's world test cricket will be boring without SEHWAG. Truely great champions.

  • on August 6, 2010, 4:07 GMT

    Oh what a sight it would have been to see these two bat together. I wonder how would have Sehwag handled the West Indies pace battery!!!

  • nvngupta on August 6, 2010, 4:03 GMT

    once again a briliant article by Hharsha. similarities in figures at 79 tests is hairraising.

  • sanjayk53 on August 6, 2010, 4:02 GMT

    Some cricket memories never fade. I remember Gavaskar against Roberts and co in 1975/76 series in India. While it was Vishy who provided the best counterattack throughout the series, particularly his innings in Chepauk, it was Gavaskar's innings of 86 in Wankhede that was the most pleasant to watch for its footwork, shot selection and aggression. I also remember watching a young Tendu take on the Delhi bowlers , including a certain Indian bowler called Maninder Singh, in the Ranji tropgy semi final in Wankhede in 1989 and one could immediately see a future star rising - such was his mastery of stroke play. And so one comes to Sehwag. who can forget his 293 onslaught or hiss 195 in Melbourne. You can compare them for what they are worth, but each have shone for their individual styles and have been respected by their opponents. That is the hall mark of classic greatness.

  • BillyCC on August 6, 2010, 4:00 GMT

    They would form an excellent opening partnership. One weakness would be the fact they are both short, right-handed batsmen so the quick single would be redundant if you were trying to upset a bowler's length and line.

  • Columbia13 on August 6, 2010, 3:48 GMT

    I know it would have been great watching Gavaskar and Sehwag bat together. Even though that is not possible, we have had the priviledge of watching Dravid and Sehwag bat together.The 410 run patnership in Pakistan was the highlight and they have had a few other good stands as well. I feel that experience would be pretty close. I never saw Gavaskar bat but I know he was in the Dravid mould. Infact, even sachin and sehwag together is a surreal experience!!

  • cric84life on August 6, 2010, 3:48 GMT

    as always... nicely written.. Yeh Dil always maange more !!! Give me more ;)

  • on August 6, 2010, 3:45 GMT

    The last piece of stats is just amazing. Thoroughly took me by surprise! Good read Harsha!

  • thenkabail on August 6, 2010, 3:45 GMT

    Two of the greatest: Gavaskar was my evergreen hero. Indeed the best batsman India has ever produced (Sachin included). His perfection of technique is just not seen in modern batsman. But Shewag is very special. Still his contribution to Indian team is under rated. He is certainly the best batsman in the world today- heads and shoulder above others. The only correction Shewag needs to make is to bat first 5 overs calmly and let rest of the day bat at his blistering best. Over next year we need to replace Laxman, Dravid, and Sachin. Where are the youngesters?.

  • AEST on August 6, 2010, 3:43 GMT

    Is it really fair to compare Sehwag with SIR Sunil Manohar Gavaskar... Kindly have a look at their statistics in the 4th innings of a match... Both of them are openers and have good number of opportunities to show their talent in the 4th innings... In my opinion a batsman's ability has got to be tested either in the 4th innings or on the 5th day of a test match under pressure... In this regard, Gavaskar is far ahead of Sachin Tendulkar also... So i beg please dont compare Gavaskar with anyone other than Bradman... He is only next to Bradman...

  • on August 6, 2010, 3:41 GMT

    Sunny-Viru combination as openers will be very good on paper. But if you visualize practically, it maynot be a great combination. The reason being their extreme batting approches. Sehwag expects his partner to take quick singles, rotate strike freqently etc like how he does with Gambhir, Sachin, Vijay. If Gavasakar keeps on blocking at the other end, Sehwag will be under pressure.

  • Sridhu on August 6, 2010, 3:39 GMT

    But we did have a glimpse of this when SMG & Kris Srikkanth batted together, didn't we?

    Have been wondering what would have happened if Srikkanth had been given his head (a la Sehwag) by a smart captain. Anybody who can hit Marshall's (at his peak, to make it more interesting!) first ball for six and the next for four has to have a bit of talent.

  • knowledge_eater on August 6, 2010, 3:35 GMT

    Unfortunately I haven't seen SMG play, but what I heard from oldies the goldies, that Gavaskar was the most stubborn batsman. He was bit cocky too. Well, those two similarities I can compare with Sehwag. I wouldn't call Viru cocky but he is little bit above confident and in between overconfident and confident. But Sehwag batting style is very stubborn for sure. It would be havoc if both played together. Imagine this line up. Sehwag Gavaskar Dravid Sachin .. thats all star line up right there. Very well written article. Enjoyed it.

  • Vivek.Bhandari on August 6, 2010, 3:33 GMT

    Apart from the obvious differences in both of these greats of Indian cricket, there are some similarities as well. Both of them are fearless, speak their mind, refuse to follow the set path, are skillfully street-smart cricketers who know how to bend/mend the rules.

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  • Vivek.Bhandari on August 6, 2010, 3:33 GMT

    Apart from the obvious differences in both of these greats of Indian cricket, there are some similarities as well. Both of them are fearless, speak their mind, refuse to follow the set path, are skillfully street-smart cricketers who know how to bend/mend the rules.

  • knowledge_eater on August 6, 2010, 3:35 GMT

    Unfortunately I haven't seen SMG play, but what I heard from oldies the goldies, that Gavaskar was the most stubborn batsman. He was bit cocky too. Well, those two similarities I can compare with Sehwag. I wouldn't call Viru cocky but he is little bit above confident and in between overconfident and confident. But Sehwag batting style is very stubborn for sure. It would be havoc if both played together. Imagine this line up. Sehwag Gavaskar Dravid Sachin .. thats all star line up right there. Very well written article. Enjoyed it.

  • Sridhu on August 6, 2010, 3:39 GMT

    But we did have a glimpse of this when SMG & Kris Srikkanth batted together, didn't we?

    Have been wondering what would have happened if Srikkanth had been given his head (a la Sehwag) by a smart captain. Anybody who can hit Marshall's (at his peak, to make it more interesting!) first ball for six and the next for four has to have a bit of talent.

  • on August 6, 2010, 3:41 GMT

    Sunny-Viru combination as openers will be very good on paper. But if you visualize practically, it maynot be a great combination. The reason being their extreme batting approches. Sehwag expects his partner to take quick singles, rotate strike freqently etc like how he does with Gambhir, Sachin, Vijay. If Gavasakar keeps on blocking at the other end, Sehwag will be under pressure.

  • AEST on August 6, 2010, 3:43 GMT

    Is it really fair to compare Sehwag with SIR Sunil Manohar Gavaskar... Kindly have a look at their statistics in the 4th innings of a match... Both of them are openers and have good number of opportunities to show their talent in the 4th innings... In my opinion a batsman's ability has got to be tested either in the 4th innings or on the 5th day of a test match under pressure... In this regard, Gavaskar is far ahead of Sachin Tendulkar also... So i beg please dont compare Gavaskar with anyone other than Bradman... He is only next to Bradman...

  • thenkabail on August 6, 2010, 3:45 GMT

    Two of the greatest: Gavaskar was my evergreen hero. Indeed the best batsman India has ever produced (Sachin included). His perfection of technique is just not seen in modern batsman. But Shewag is very special. Still his contribution to Indian team is under rated. He is certainly the best batsman in the world today- heads and shoulder above others. The only correction Shewag needs to make is to bat first 5 overs calmly and let rest of the day bat at his blistering best. Over next year we need to replace Laxman, Dravid, and Sachin. Where are the youngesters?.

  • on August 6, 2010, 3:45 GMT

    The last piece of stats is just amazing. Thoroughly took me by surprise! Good read Harsha!

  • cric84life on August 6, 2010, 3:48 GMT

    as always... nicely written.. Yeh Dil always maange more !!! Give me more ;)

  • Columbia13 on August 6, 2010, 3:48 GMT

    I know it would have been great watching Gavaskar and Sehwag bat together. Even though that is not possible, we have had the priviledge of watching Dravid and Sehwag bat together.The 410 run patnership in Pakistan was the highlight and they have had a few other good stands as well. I feel that experience would be pretty close. I never saw Gavaskar bat but I know he was in the Dravid mould. Infact, even sachin and sehwag together is a surreal experience!!

  • BillyCC on August 6, 2010, 4:00 GMT

    They would form an excellent opening partnership. One weakness would be the fact they are both short, right-handed batsmen so the quick single would be redundant if you were trying to upset a bowler's length and line.