'Amateurism endures, and mightily'
'Amateurism endures, and mightily'

Gideon Haigh's speech at the Bradman Oration in Melbourne, during which he spoke about the the importance and pleasures of club cricket, and the impact it has had on Australia as a country

What should the ICC be?
What should the ICC be?

Cricket's governing body has long been a fiefdom board presidents use to serve their countries' interests. It's time it became a modern policy-making institution instead

Which are the greatest dynasties of them all?
Which are the greatest dynasties of them all?

Is it possible to compare the Invincibles of 1948 to the West Indian teams of the '80s and '90s? After all they were simply products of their time

Ave Test cricket
Ave Test cricket

Many premature reports of its death later, the five-day game still stands, a byword for excellence in an era that encourages, and even worships, mass mediocrity

Where's the next Katich coming from?
Where's the next Katich coming from?

CA needs to focus on developing proper cricketers, but it seems too much in thrall to the needs of Twenty20 to care

It's an Irish question and a global one
It's an Irish question and a global one

Ireland deserve to participate in the 2015 World Cup. That the ICC executive board wishes to freeze them out reflects a new phase in the game's global evolution

Who administers the administrators?
Who administers the administrators?

Players are expected to follow a code of conduct. But is there one such for those who govern the game? Self-regulation is no longer a solution to corruption in cricket

Cricket Australia, look at yourself
Cricket Australia, look at yourself

Australians used to pride themselves on having the best cricket governance. Not anymore, now that the board seems bent on casting itself as a marketing organisation that dabbles in the game on the side

The man who became legspin
The man who became legspin

No bowler exemplifies the art of the legbreak as much as Shane Warne does; no bowler ever will

The man who needs no introduction
The man who needs no introduction

He went from Wild Thing to nothing to everything a fast bowler should be

The gold standard
The gold standard

Chappell had talent, elegance and technique to burn, but more formidable was the discipline he imposed on himself - one more severe than those of any of his contemporaries

One hundred per cent Australian
One hundred per cent Australian

The martial air of his name extended to the field, where he was as ruthless and relentless as he was self-effacing off of it

No favourite, no underdog
No favourite, no underdog

Form or intuition - what does one go by when picking a team to back for the Ashes? Both Australia and England seem vulnerable this time round

The joy of the past
The joy of the past

There may be plenty of well-known problems inherent in picking all-time XIs, but the exercise is still a worthwhile one

The excluded
The excluded

Our soon-to-be announced all-time world XI will be picked from a shortlist of 88. But there are plenty of stellar names outside those ranks, as this XI, chosen from those who weren't on the shortlists, proves

The age of conspiracy
The age of conspiracy

The tendency to blame external elements for every problem - as seen in Ijaz Butt's recent utterances - can only be countered by making governance more transparent and being serious about conflicts of interest

The poor boy who came to walk among kings
The poor boy who came to walk among kings

Bradman was cricket's first modern hero, a man who transcended his game, embodied the modern Australian journey, and became a symbol of mastery over fate

Corruption? It's everywhere
Corruption? It's everywhere

It's no wonder there's match-fixing in the modern game, with its environment of easy money and pervasive maladministration

Packer's circus
Packer's circus

The circumstances were already in place. The Australian media magnate simply triggered the explosion

Cricket's fig leaf of democracy
Cricket's fig leaf of democracy

To be legit, democracy needs to meet certain preconditions. In cricket, legitimacy is something the boards have been happy to overlook, as shown by the Howard affair