Matches (18)
IPL (1)
ENG v NZ (1)
SLCD-XI in ENG (1)
Vitality Blast (8)
4-Day Championship (3)
BAN v SL (1)
SL-W in PAK (1)
CWC League 2 (1)
T20 Challenge (1)
Miscellaneous

CBC playing same old tune again-hitting out

Cricket and calypso definitely have a lot in common

Haydn Gill
23-Jun-2000
Cricket and calypso definitely have a lot in common.
For years, it had always been said in calypso circles that many seasoned performers tended to sound the same way year after year.
The same tune is now developing in cricket.
Whenever international cricket comes around, we always hear that live television coverage is in doubt because of inadequate financial resources.
The sad story in the whole affair is that there is always a huge public outcry when we hear that there is a distinct possibility that we will not be able to watch the cricket from the comfort of our living rooms.
Those in the television business bemoan the fact that advertisers are not coming forward.
Most of public will reserve their tongue-lashing for Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) or the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU).
Time and again, CBC and CBU tell you that they continue to facilitate the coverage cricket in the face of severe losses.
Amidst all the debate, there are hardly any suggestions put forward to ensure there is no repeat of what took place last week when CBC was scrambling to put things in place for the coverage of the current England tour.
The same way we are quick to be critical, we should be as urgent in offering a solution.
Let's face it, we cannot continue to depend on the corporate sector for every single cent.
As passionate lovers of the game, we must also be prepared to foot the bill.
When I say we, I refer to the all the stakeholders in West Indies cricket - corporate entities, the West Indies Cricket Board and the fans.
Fans must not feel that it should always be their privilege to watch cricket without having to contribute.
When there was a cloud over television coverage for last year's tour to New Zealand, CBC was forced to go the route of offering it as a Pay-Per-View package.
While I can see the thinking behind such a move, the fact of the matter is that it will eliminate a high percentage who those who do not have access to that facility.
Channels, therefore, must be found to allow everyone to make a contribution.
One way to do this is to add a 10 per cent surcharge to the cost of tickets for all international matches played in the Caribbean.
This could generate about US$200 000 annually, based on gate receipts during last year's home series against Australia that netted US$3.1 million and the 1998 series against England that yielded US$2.6 million.
The WICB could also match the effort of spectators by allocating 10 per cent of the gate receipts for television coverage.
That accounts for US$400 000 from the WICB and ticket-holders.
What about those who fall in neither category?
In the same way banks accounts are opened to raise funds for various causes (fire victims etc), an account could be set up around the Caribbean for others to help towards the cause.
For years, it had always been said in calypso circles that many seasoned performers tended to sound the same way year after year.
The same tune is now developing in cricket.
Whenever international cricket comes around, we always hear that live television coverage is in doubt because of inadequate financial resources.
The sad story in the whole affair is that there is always a huge public outcry when we hear that there is a distinct possibility that we will not be able to watch the cricket from the comfort of our living rooms.
Those in the television business bemoan the fact that advertisers are not coming forward.
Most of public will reserve their tongue-lashing for Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) or the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU).
Time and again, CBC and CBU tell you that they continue to facilitate the coverage cricket in the face of severe losses.
Amidst all the debate, there are hardly any suggestions put forward to ensure there is no repeat of what took place last week when CBC was scrambling to put things in place for the coverage of the current England tour.
The same way we are quick to be critical, we should be as urgent in offering a solution.
Let's face it, we cannot continue to depend on the corporate sector for every single cent.
As passionate lovers of the game, we must also be prepared to foot the bill.
When I say we, I refer to the all the stakeholders in West Indies cricket - corporate entities, the West Indies Cricket Board and the fans.
Fans must not feel that it should always be their privilege to watch cricket without having to contribute.
When there was a cloud over television coverage for last year's tour to New Zealand, CBC was forced to go the route of offering it as a Pay-Per-View package.
While I can see the thinking behind such a move, the fact of the matter is that it will eliminate a high percentage who those who do not have access to that facility.
Channels, therefore, must be found to allow everyone to make a contribution.
One way to do this is to add a 10 per cent surcharge to the cost of tickets for all international matches played in the Caribbean.
This could generate about US$200 000 annually, based on gate receipts during last year's home series against Australia that netted US$3.1 million and the 1998 series against England that yielded US$2.6 million.
The WICB could also match the effort of spectators by allocating 10 per cent of the gate receipts for television coverage.
That accounts for US$400 000 from the WICB and ticket-holders.
What about those who fall in neither category?
In the same way banks accounts are opened to raise funds for various causes (fire victims etc), an account could be set up around the Caribbean for others to help towards the cause.
.