February 8, 2010

Hawk-Eye at your fingertips

Hawk-Eye, the ball-tracking technology that ensured that umpiring in cricket matches was never the same, has now been fully integrated into our live match coverage
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You have seen it all on television, and it's likely that you would have caught it on Cricinfo during the Champions Trophy. But here's the real deal: Hawk-Eye, the ball-tracking technology that ensured that umpiring in cricket matches was never the same, has now been fully integrated into our live match coverage.

And there is one thing we can offer you that television doesn't. The internet advantage makes you the master. All the graphics that the television producers showed you are now at your disposal. Now create those pitch maps, beehives and wagonwheels at your will and at your leisure.

But before you start exploring, here are some useful tips from S Rajesh, our stats editor, who's having some fun himself.

The Pitch Map - Shows where the ball has pitched, and moving the mouse over each ball gives more details - over number, batsman, bowler, runs scored; clicking on the ball gives the trajectory of that ball.

Ball speeds - Shows the speed for each ball bowled by every bowler, with a marker to indicate the ball in which a wicket fell. Moving the mouse over the graph for the bowler shows the over of the innings, the batsman on strike, and the runs scored off that ball. You can also click on it to see the trajectory of the ball.

Beehive - Shows where the ball has passed the batsman. Again, can be drilled down to each ball, with a click showing the trajectory of that ball.

Variable bounce - A graphic which differentiates, by colour code, the balls which would have hit the stumps from those which would have gone over the stumps. A pitch with variable bounce would show balls in the same area having different colour codes.

Wagon wheel - A stroke by stroke account of runs scored, with an option to see the trajectory of each ball.

Partnership - The total partnership for each wicket, and the contribution by each player.

Run rate - Line graph for run rates of each team, with details of runs scored in each over.

And so if you want to find out just why Dale Steyn was so deadly today, first look for the pitch map, and then his beehive.

Sambit Bal is the editor of ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Smart sabola on February 23, 2010, 11:23 GMT

    hawk-eye is revolutionary to the game but i must be worried if i were an umpire, it seems like hawk-eye is there to expose how inaccurate an umpoirer can be.

  • Duncan on February 11, 2010, 11:12 GMT

    great stuff. Just in terms of the ball by ball commentary, I love the addition of 'wickets' so one does not have to scroll all through the commentary to find what happened. Equally useful would be the addition of "chances" a summary of these and description would be great. Then we (the reader) can get a better feel for the teams performance and the "if onlys..."

  • Amla on February 10, 2010, 4:35 GMT

    Hashim Amla you played a wonderful inning and your contribution palyed a big role in defeating India by inning and 6 run - keep up the good work "Insha Allah"

  • Praful Parab on February 10, 2010, 4:21 GMT

    One more request. In live commentry, now we can see even the speed, it will good if it is provided as a link and a click on the same will display the ball trajectory animation in Haw Eye. Yesterday i really struggled to find trajectory of the ball 54.3 & 54.6 where Sach was beaten in so many Dots.... :(

  • Praful Parab on February 10, 2010, 4:14 GMT

    The new featue is truely amazing. :) Loved it. There is one suggestion for the Win Likelyhood graph. The x Axis "Match Progress" can be divided into Days and session as its unit. This will be more informative (in presentation terms) about the swing about the match.

    Good work Cricinfo team !!!!!!

  • Omar on February 9, 2010, 13:38 GMT

    Brilliant, love it. Also like the win likelihood - how is that calculated?

  • Ian on February 9, 2010, 13:18 GMT

    This is good news to cricket followers who want more detail and analysis and also the opportunity to undertake this themselves.

  • Atul Bhogle on February 9, 2010, 12:10 GMT

    Brilliant; Cricinfo just continues to get better...

  • tajinder on February 9, 2010, 10:25 GMT

    good

  • Leo on February 9, 2010, 9:22 GMT

    I love the hawkeye, really puts you in the action

  • Smart sabola on February 23, 2010, 11:23 GMT

    hawk-eye is revolutionary to the game but i must be worried if i were an umpire, it seems like hawk-eye is there to expose how inaccurate an umpoirer can be.

  • Duncan on February 11, 2010, 11:12 GMT

    great stuff. Just in terms of the ball by ball commentary, I love the addition of 'wickets' so one does not have to scroll all through the commentary to find what happened. Equally useful would be the addition of "chances" a summary of these and description would be great. Then we (the reader) can get a better feel for the teams performance and the "if onlys..."

  • Amla on February 10, 2010, 4:35 GMT

    Hashim Amla you played a wonderful inning and your contribution palyed a big role in defeating India by inning and 6 run - keep up the good work "Insha Allah"

  • Praful Parab on February 10, 2010, 4:21 GMT

    One more request. In live commentry, now we can see even the speed, it will good if it is provided as a link and a click on the same will display the ball trajectory animation in Haw Eye. Yesterday i really struggled to find trajectory of the ball 54.3 & 54.6 where Sach was beaten in so many Dots.... :(

  • Praful Parab on February 10, 2010, 4:14 GMT

    The new featue is truely amazing. :) Loved it. There is one suggestion for the Win Likelyhood graph. The x Axis "Match Progress" can be divided into Days and session as its unit. This will be more informative (in presentation terms) about the swing about the match.

    Good work Cricinfo team !!!!!!

  • Omar on February 9, 2010, 13:38 GMT

    Brilliant, love it. Also like the win likelihood - how is that calculated?

  • Ian on February 9, 2010, 13:18 GMT

    This is good news to cricket followers who want more detail and analysis and also the opportunity to undertake this themselves.

  • Atul Bhogle on February 9, 2010, 12:10 GMT

    Brilliant; Cricinfo just continues to get better...

  • tajinder on February 9, 2010, 10:25 GMT

    good

  • Leo on February 9, 2010, 9:22 GMT

    I love the hawkeye, really puts you in the action

  • Nauman on February 9, 2010, 7:01 GMT

    This is really great. I couldnt have believed what i was experiencing. Thank you cricinfo and keep on great work.

  • BW Shirolkar on February 9, 2010, 6:56 GMT

    I do not think, this is required. I do not follow cricket so closely. While watching match these information are additional tools only. But in any case they look better on TV. I prefer to follow them on TV not on computers. In any case I would like watch matches in bits and pieces and not so detailed. Thanks, Shirolkar

  • Avnish on February 9, 2010, 6:53 GMT

    Great Work!!!

  • Aravind on February 9, 2010, 6:47 GMT

    It's absolutely brilliant! Those words are simply not enough to praise Cricinfo and the people involved with this. Thank you!

  • Rimtu on February 9, 2010, 6:46 GMT

    I absolutely love this! Thanks CI!

  • Monis Iqbal on February 9, 2010, 6:02 GMT

    Great. Thanks for helping the users.

  • Andrew Bennetts on February 9, 2010, 5:02 GMT

    Ah, it appears that at least for ODIs the "Worms" option is available to show a sensible graph of runs vs. overs. It baffles me that the terrible "Run Rate" graph is considered appropriate to make available for Tests and "Worms" isn't, but neither of them are particularly important for Tests so I'll cope. Thank you for providing the "Worms" option for ODIs.

  • Ashish on February 9, 2010, 4:07 GMT

    This surely is a revelation in cricket broadcast! Thanks for empowering the viewer...

  • Arsh on February 9, 2010, 3:08 GMT

    Brilliant, brilliant stuff, Cricinfo! Thank you!

  • Andrew on February 9, 2010, 2:55 GMT

    Why is there a graph of run rate vs. overs, instead of a simple runs vs. overs graph?

    The advantages to the simpler graph are overwhelming. The runs vs. overs graph represents the same information in a far more useful format: There's no wild oscillations at the start of an innings. At any point the vertical distance between the lines is exactly the different in runs at that stage of the innings. At any point the average slope of the graph (easy to judge visually) is the run rate. At any point the slope from the end of the plot to a target is the run rate required for that target. A late acceleration makes an identical impact to an early one.

    Every time I hear a Channel 9 commentator offer their analysis of the run rate graph it's like someone is scraping their fingernails down a blackboard.

  • RAM on February 9, 2010, 0:25 GMT

    kind of an information overload but considering the cricket enthusiasts over this place....nothing will be too much i guess

  • Catfish on February 9, 2010, 0:24 GMT

    Please use metric for HawkEye's bowling speeds. Of the cricket-playing nations, only that backwater known as the UK still uses Imperial measurements. Even Cricinfo's commentary uses metric. Get with the programme.

  • Karan Varma on February 9, 2010, 0:18 GMT

    Wow! this is simply incredible. Keep up the good work Cricinfo.

  • Rizwan Younus on February 8, 2010, 22:59 GMT

    Dear Sambit May i just begin by saying that your articles rock and are always a fascinating read! for me though i just have to say that hawkeye is the biggest load of rubbish I have ever seen. Having watched internation cricket for 15 years it shows balls hitting leg stump which are almost impossible. Can it really take into account the kind of pitch your playing on? As a example a ball hitting the pad in perth is almost certain to go over but in multan or delhi it wont. Its just not accurate and im sure that other cricket lovers would agree!!!!! Salam Namaste.

  • that_90s_cricket_lover on February 8, 2010, 21:55 GMT

    Great addition. Sitting in my office I could use it to see precisely the line of attack today by SA seamers. Lots of short pitched stuff, some wide full deliveries tempting the drive, worked like a charm. Always wanted this control in my hand rather than being at the mercy of the commentary.

  • Rohit Singh on February 8, 2010, 21:16 GMT

    "And there is one thing we can offer you that television doesn't. The internet advantage makes you the master. All the graphics that the television producers showed you are now at your disposal. Now create those pitch maps, beehives and wagonwheels at your will and at your leisure."

    Does anyone even care? I mean sometimes you give us a feeling that we are a bunch of idiots who have nothing more to do in life than to over analyze every single ball bowled in a cricket match 100s of times! Its good to see it once on TV. But to assume that a vast majority of us would like to do this over and over again on our personal computers over the internet...is bizarre! Its time cricinfo took a break!

  • satish saravanan on February 8, 2010, 20:26 GMT

    wow...this is ultimate technology for die hard cricket fans to know about whats happening in the middle...kudos to cricinfo for this!!!

  • Sriniketh on February 8, 2010, 20:03 GMT

    It does not tell us whether the bowler bowled from OTW(Over the wicket)or RTW(Round the wicket). "o" or "r" can be mentioned as well. The LBW rule changes when the angle of delivery changes!

  • Raghavan on February 8, 2010, 19:51 GMT

    Can u explain how you calculate the win likelihood? Based on historical reuslts/ statistics or something like that?

  • vicky kapil on February 8, 2010, 19:51 GMT

    this is greatttt!!! another revolutionary step by cricinfo... this will give such a realistic feel of the match. so now we can analyse every bowl and stroke played... a genuine cricket-lover's delight... thanks cricinfo for this.

  • Twister on February 8, 2010, 19:23 GMT

    Could you please give us a breakdown of how the win percentage is calculated?

  • Daniel Mortlock on February 8, 2010, 18:30 GMT

    All very impressive, and I particularly like the "Win Likelihood" plot . . . although I'm a bit mystified at the long "flat" periods followed by sudden "jumps" that don't seem to be associated with an obvious event like a wicket. I'd love to know what changed at those moments.

  • Asif on February 8, 2010, 17:55 GMT

    It will be really good if we can filter out the balls by type (wicket taking balls, dot balls etc..)

  • Mahesh Punjabi on February 8, 2010, 17:02 GMT

    Just a comment on why a country with over a billion people cannot produce ONE bowler who can maintain 150K like our S.African or Australian counterparts? If we do find someone who can bowl 140+ we tell them to concentrate on line and length! And there speeds go down to 130+. Let someone comb the villages and find someone wo can bowl fast and keep banging it!

  • Rishabh on February 8, 2010, 16:53 GMT

    Amazing stuff! In fact I saw this new Hawkeye and other stats system today. Really awesome stuff guys. A job well done by the cricinfo staff.

  • Ayush on February 8, 2010, 16:41 GMT

    Can you please explain how the Win Percentage is calculated? That seemed like the most interesting feature, and I'd like to know the logic behind it

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • Ayush on February 8, 2010, 16:41 GMT

    Can you please explain how the Win Percentage is calculated? That seemed like the most interesting feature, and I'd like to know the logic behind it

  • Rishabh on February 8, 2010, 16:53 GMT

    Amazing stuff! In fact I saw this new Hawkeye and other stats system today. Really awesome stuff guys. A job well done by the cricinfo staff.

  • Mahesh Punjabi on February 8, 2010, 17:02 GMT

    Just a comment on why a country with over a billion people cannot produce ONE bowler who can maintain 150K like our S.African or Australian counterparts? If we do find someone who can bowl 140+ we tell them to concentrate on line and length! And there speeds go down to 130+. Let someone comb the villages and find someone wo can bowl fast and keep banging it!

  • Asif on February 8, 2010, 17:55 GMT

    It will be really good if we can filter out the balls by type (wicket taking balls, dot balls etc..)

  • Daniel Mortlock on February 8, 2010, 18:30 GMT

    All very impressive, and I particularly like the "Win Likelihood" plot . . . although I'm a bit mystified at the long "flat" periods followed by sudden "jumps" that don't seem to be associated with an obvious event like a wicket. I'd love to know what changed at those moments.

  • Twister on February 8, 2010, 19:23 GMT

    Could you please give us a breakdown of how the win percentage is calculated?

  • vicky kapil on February 8, 2010, 19:51 GMT

    this is greatttt!!! another revolutionary step by cricinfo... this will give such a realistic feel of the match. so now we can analyse every bowl and stroke played... a genuine cricket-lover's delight... thanks cricinfo for this.

  • Raghavan on February 8, 2010, 19:51 GMT

    Can u explain how you calculate the win likelihood? Based on historical reuslts/ statistics or something like that?

  • Sriniketh on February 8, 2010, 20:03 GMT

    It does not tell us whether the bowler bowled from OTW(Over the wicket)or RTW(Round the wicket). "o" or "r" can be mentioned as well. The LBW rule changes when the angle of delivery changes!

  • satish saravanan on February 8, 2010, 20:26 GMT

    wow...this is ultimate technology for die hard cricket fans to know about whats happening in the middle...kudos to cricinfo for this!!!