OCTOBER 31, 2014

Pakistan cricket

Malala trophy for Pakistan U-21 women

The Pakistan Cricket Board has named the country's Under-21 women's tournament after activist and 2014 Nobel Peace Prize co-recipient Malala Yousafzai in an effort to encourage girls to take up the game.

"PCB has decided to honour Malala, Pakistan's young Nobel laureate for peace 2014, by naming its inaugural Under-21 national women cricket championship 2014-2015 after her," a PCB release said.

PCB chairman Shaharyar Khan said he hoped the move would give female cricketers "inspiration and stimulus to excel".

"Our women cricketers have gradually picked up and only last month the women's team has retained the Asian Games gold at Incheon," he was quoted as saying by AFP.

The tournament is scheduled to be held in December with 12 regional teams taking part.

OCTOBER 31, 2014

Australia 4/1 for T20 series sweep

ESPNcricinfo staff: Australia can lick their wounds from a difficult tour of the Middle East with a T20 series back at home against South Africa. The Aussies should be too strong and are 4/1 to sweep the series 3-0.
OCTOBER 31, 2014

Cricket's great battles

Warne v Tendulkar, one more time

Sachin Tendulkar facing Shane Warne. It's been one of cricket's most anticipated battles over the last two decades. In a video for Yahoo! Cricket at Lord's, Ian Ward asks Tendulkar and Warne what it was like planning for the contest and how they would go about attacking the other. Warne also bowls to Tendulkar at the end.

OCTOBER 31, 2014

How boring is boring cricket?

Russell Jackson: Having graced the airwaves for more than four decades, he is a broadcasting institution on par with Benaud, despite not having played at senior level
OCTOBER 31, 2014

Give pause a chance, plead bowlers

R Rajkumar: The administrators should not be allowed to police every single aspect of bowling
OCTOBER 30, 2014

Pakistan cricket

Explaining Pakistan cricket

Pakistan's unpredictability is renowned. They scale unbelievable highs and slump to inexplicable lows. They haven't played at home in five years, but produce cricketers of rare talent. Their cricket board is in a mess and there is never a shortage of controversy, but their performance on the field is always an event. Andy Bull simply loves them and he says why in the Guardian

What a curious affliction it must be to be a full-time Pakistan fan, to follow a side who go through such giddy swings of form. Does anyone in cricket suffer so much? And is anyone in cricket rewarded for their suffering with such exquisite performances, such paroxysmic peaks of pleasure? In the last week the world watched, ever-more slack jawed, as they destroyed Australia in the first Test at Dubai. The result gave just as much pleasure to cricket-lovers in this corner of the world as Pakistan's 3-0 demolition of England in 2011 must have done to those Down Under. And yet it was only a fortnight ago that Pakistan lost two wickets for no runs at all in the final over of an ODI when they only needed two to win. Off Glenn Maxwell's bowling.

OCTOBER 30, 2014

Australian cricket

The case for Wade

Matthew Wade is temporarily back in Australia's one-day squad, despite a poor Matador Cup with the bat, because if Brad Haddin is missing at any stage from now to the end of the World Cup he is the safest replacement as wicketkeeper, writes Jesse Hogan in the Sydney Morning Herald.

Arguably the most credible candidate to fill in for Haddin for the first two one-dayers, based on Matador Cup form, was Ben Dunk. The Tasmanian belted 403 runs at an average of 67.17 and a strike-rate of 109.21, including a record innings of 229 not out off 157 deliveries. He has, however, been playing as a specialist batsman. While it is right to give him a chance for Australia in Twenty20, especially as he is a legitimate contender to succeed Haddin in that format, it is a bridge too far to bring someone who has been playing as a specialist batsman straight in to be Australia's one-day gloveman, even just for two matches. When it comes to career domestic one-day averages and strike-rates Wade's - 38.95 and 84.14 - is the best of all the available glovemen

OCTOBER 30, 2014

Pakistan and Australia learn from the first Test

Alex Bowden: The two teams' coaches hold forth on the lessons from the game
OCTOBER 30, 2014

Cricket's humanity resists specialisation

Jon Hotten: While major sports across the world are driving their competitors towards homogenous physical ideals, cricket seems to celebrate diversity
OCTOBER 30, 2014

Can there be a World Cup in NZ without a Latham?

Beige Brigade: The boys pick their New Zealand World Cup squads, debate keepers Watling and Ronchi, and talk about the other teams' chances
OCTOBER 29, 2014

Dangerous Windies

Satish Acharya
OCTOBER 29, 2014

Angry Boy to rescue BCCI's ad revenues

Andrew Hughes: Captain Cool's sidekick is taking the India-Sri Lanka series very seriously
OCTOBER 28, 2014

Batting: Pakistan's surprise weapon

Kamran Abbasi: An inexperienced bowling attack may have stunned Australia, but the batting had a bigger impact on the result, led by the genial Younis Khan
OCTOBER 28, 2014

Indian cricket

A young, upbeat, fresh Mukund

Having last played for India in 2011, opener Abhinav Mukund tells Nihal Koshie of the Indian Express how he is working on his batting, what cricket he was playing in England recently, how his thinking has changed since his Test debut, and that, being 24, a long road lies ahead of him.

"When I made my Test debut, I wasn't as prepared as I thought I was. I was a young rash kid and just went out and batted and it worked because of whatever I had practiced previously. I played a rash shot at Lord's. I faced the challenge of an Indian batsman playing abroad in England. I am still 24 and it is always a matter of just one good Ranji Trophy season and you are back in the reckoning. You never know what might happen in a year."

OCTOBER 28, 2014

Indian cricket

India's self-critical fast bowler

After generations India has been able to produce genuine fast bowlers. Varun Aaron is one of them and in conversation with Bharat Sundaresan of the Indian Express, he explains how he uses the bouncer, how consistency is key and what similarities lie between him and Marat Safin.

"You can't just say I'm on full throttle and bowl full-tosses and half-trackers. You bowl fast and be consistent or swing the ball and be consistent. Consistency is the common factor. My strength is not bowling a half-volley length or trying to swing the ball from upfront. I can't bowl a half-volley and swing the ball. That's the way Bhuvi bowls. My full is hitting the top of off, and that's what I am always striving to do," he explains.

OCTOBER 28, 2014

Australia in UAE 2014-15

Kim's calamity, and a case of soured relations

In the Guardian, Russell Jackson looks at six memorable tours of Australia in Pakistan - from the 1982 tour when Australia failed to win a single game, to the 1998 tour that was the setting for Mark Taylor's 334

Their birthdates were even more flexible than the wrists of the spinners, we spelled their names wrong or else pronounced them incorrectly and marveled that the earth contained so many people with at least two Qs in their name. These Pakistan teams that we saw with our own eyes or on Channel 9's telecasts were easy to fall in love with for they were loaded with unconventional talent and an abundance of memorable characters like Imran, Sarfraz, Qasim, Ijaz, Wasim, Waqar, Saeed, plus all those Mushtaqs and Mohammads. And Mushtaq Mohammad.

OCTOBER 28, 2014

Australia in UAE 2014-15

The first day of the rest of Australia's cricket life

In the Sydney Morning Herald, Greg Baum analyses Australia's 221-run loss to Pakistan in the first Test in Dubai and says that while the defeat is tough, it's not a catastrophe for a side that is being remade and reinforced.

Let us wince, but not catastrophise. The miracle of last summer was that all that winning without end was achieved by a patchwork team - the ancient, the rejected, the brittle, the untried, but most of all, the Mitch Johnson - that found inspiration within and brought England and South Africa to heel. But it was also obvious that it could not last, that the team would have to be renewed and reinforced and remade, and that the process would involve some pain, and it is now obvious that the Gulf was always going to be a difficult venue for the new beginning. In Dubai, the two debutants floundered at times, which ought not to have surprised; they were up a level. They underscored the reality that this is a different team in a different place at a different time. This could never have been the Ashes and South Africa continued. It was the first day of the rest of Australia's cricket life.

OCTOBER 28, 2014

CSK dressing room transcripts released

James Marsh: Police release unseen video footage in the case
OCTOBER 28, 2014

The power that books hold

Jonathan Wilson: We may not be strangers to what players say, but we still tend to accord their words greater respect when they're on paper and between two covers
OCTOBER 27, 2014

An air of mistrust

Swaroop Mamidipudi: A little more conversation - between players, the board and the WIPA - could have averted the sorry end to the West Indies tour of India
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