Future of cricket

OCTOBER 30, 2014

Cricket's humanity resists specialisation

Jon Hotten: While major sports across the world are driving their competitors towards homogenous physical ideals, cricket seems to celebrate diversity
All sorts of body types can make it in each of cricket's three skills © Getty Images
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OCTOBER 19, 2014

Broadcasting

Has cricket hit the roof?

Cricket's dominance in India might not be fading just yet, but the team's performance has not been as compelling as the last decade and high-profile retirements since have also had an impact on viewership. Ashok Malik, in Asian Age, wonders if a saturation has been reached, especially with other sports enticing the average fan.

Cricket viewership, even Indian Premier League viewership, is not growing. It has either reached a ceiling (IPL) or a floor (Test cricket). Even limited-overs cricket (the Fifty50) game, the mainstay of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), is showing a worrying pattern. On-ground presence is lower than previously. The BCCI is masking it by hosting matches mainly in smaller cities and towns, where the novelty may still be there. As for television, a comparison between the India-West Indies limited-overs series of 2011 and 2013 would be telling. Both series were played in India. The first was played in the aftermath of India's World Cup victory and showed a TRP of 3.4 (male/15-34/Sec A, B and C). By the 2013 series, the TRP number had fallen to 2.2. TRP figures for the just-concluded (October 2014) India-West Indies series were not immediately available.

SEPTEMBER 10, 2014

What will cricket be like 50 or 100 years from now?

Jon Hotten: It's a daunting thought because it feels like the game has already completed its evolution, leaving little wriggle room
JUNE 27, 2014

ICC annual conference 2014

Cricket makes 'a fool of itself'

The doubts over N Srinivasan's status in the BCCI and the investigations against his IPL franchise and son-in-law for allegations of corruption did not hinder his appointment as the ICC's first chairman after a restructure of the world governing body. Chloe Saltau, writing in the Sydney Morning Herald, says the support Srinivasan has received from other ICC members does not help improve the game's image when it comes to fighting corruption.

Even if, as Srinivasan says, he is proven to have done nothing wrong, the fact that other members of the ICC endorsed him for the chairmanship hardly inspires confidence in their collective desire to stamp out corruption from the sport.

JUNE 11, 2014

What's more important: participating or getting better?

Michael Jeh: If clubs in junior cricket focus solely on retaining players year after year, there is bound to be a dilution in talent and the level of competition
MAY 14, 2014

England and the IPL: a thaw will come

Jon Hotten: It's clear now that T20 cricket will not exist in isolation from the rest of the game, and the sooner the ECB realises it, the better
MAY 07, 2014

Caribbean national sides, anyone?

Martin Jones: Why dissolving West Indies might be the best option for West Indies cricket
APRIL 18, 2014

Why India are not cricket's Brazil yet

Samir Chopra: The numbers might be in their favour, but they can neither boast sustained excellence or a distinctive playing style
APRIL 15, 2014

You can't control talent, only channel it

Jon Hotten: Cricket runs the risk of going down the route of over-coaching, like in some other sports - which is not ideal in a game that is as much about art as about science
APRIL 08, 2014

Australian cricket

Chasing the men down

Women's cricket has been gaining acclaim in recent times and Australia's efficient defence of their World T20 title was another advertisement of their catching up with the men's game. It was set up by an attractive brand of play that has diverted attention squarely on their skills on the field and Greg Baum, in the Age, believes this is only the beginning.

Australia's women cricketers are under the same umbrella as the men, are paid more handsomely than ever before and in recent seasons have played some of their short-form internationals on the same grounds and days as the men. This was the case in Bangladesh, and in the previous women's World T20 in Sri Lanka. Presently, this coupling gives the women's matches the status and appearance of curtain-raisers. In time, they might be seen as authentic double-headers.

APRIL 08, 2014

Why T20 is about cricket's natural evolution

Ahmer Naqvi: The shortest format is but a logical extension of cricket's bias towards batsmen, and our changing ideas about time
MARCH 27, 2014

Things baseball teaches us

Matt Cleary: American sport at the SCG - blasphemy or opportunity to learn?
MARCH 14, 2014

Thinking pink

Russell Jackson: The jury's still out on the pros and cons of lighter-coloured balls and how they may or may not work in day-night Test cricket
MARCH 12, 2014

Test cricket's dodo problem

Andrew Hughes: Fans of the five-day stuff think it will last forever, even if nobody is watching
FEBRUARY 25, 2014

Bigger, better? Sorry, no

Jonathan Wilson: Why does cricket have to succumb to the marketers' eternal need for everything to be bigger, flashier, and more in tune with youth - whatever that means?
FEBRUARY 12, 2014

India cricket

IPL clean-up needs hard evidence

Writing in the Hindustan Times, Kadambari Murali Wade, the former editor of Sports Illustrated India shares her experience of meeting with the Mudgal Committee that was probing the spot-fixing and corruption charges in IPL 2013.

Drawing on her experience of an investigative story published in the magazine, and her interactions with the committee, she says that mere allegations or suggestions of corruption by the committee are not likely to help the cause of Indian cricket.

The ACSU does get information from several sources, players, journalists, officials etc. They reportedly even have several players on an unofficial watchlist. However, they find it difficult to push forward because of a lack of evidence that will stand up in court. Against this backdrop, it is interesting to note that a Supreme Court-appointed committee seems to think there is enough "evidence".

Everyone knows that Indian cricket needs to be cleaned up. But it can't be done on the basis of allegations, unless they've received hard evidence, allegations by a committee of this magnitude could be even more damaging.

JANUARY 31, 2014

Cricket always needs an underclass

Samir Chopra: History shows us that those who rule the game seem to occupy a centre they cannot bear to share with those at the margins
JANUARY 19, 2014

Time to regionalise county cricket?

Scott Oliver: A six-team tournament above the Championship might strengthen the supply line for the England team
DECEMBER 25, 2013

Test cricket and the bitter truth

Andrew Hughes: We should be trying to make Test cricket as entertaining as possible and spreading the word to every corner of the globe. But we aren't
NOVEMBER 12, 2013

What football rights have to do with the future of cricket

Jon Hotten: BT has paid a stratospheric amount for the rights to the Champions League. Cricket will probably feel the knock-on effects in time
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