DECEMBER 07, 2014

Healing by putting your bat out

Russell Jackson: Touching tributes by strangers all over the world have helped immensely in recovering from the pain of Phillip Hughes' death
A solemn yet positive tribute © Getty Images
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DECEMBER 06, 2014

The problem with watching England

Nicholas Hogg: It's not just about wanting your side to win; there's also the matter of which players you want to do well
DECEMBER 02, 2014

On growing disenchanted with the game, and the bouncer

Santosh Vijaykumar: A fan on how his appetite for cricket and excitement at witnessing a good dose of short stuff at the Gabba this December waned once news of Phillip Hughes came in
NOVEMBER 13, 2014

Embracing Maxwell's unpredictability

Russell Jackson: Fans pop a vein when his ludicrous tactics fail, shrug when he succeeds. Either way, cricket's first bona fide troll is not about to change
NOVEMBER 07, 2014

Acknowledging the Indian who doesn't care for cricket

Samir Chopra: Yes, such a tribe exists, and it cannot be dismissed easily in this age when we constantly worry about the game's future
NOVEMBER 04, 2014

Dear West Indies cricket

Nicholas Hogg: An letter from a fan who grew up idolising the great Caribbean sides of the '80s
OCTOBER 23, 2014

The renewability of cricket

Samir Chopra: We as players and spectators have a great deal to do with the perceived complexity of the game, simply because we change over time
OCTOBER 19, 2014

Broadcasting

Has cricket hit the roof?

Cricket's dominance in India might not be fading just yet, but the team's performance has not been as compelling as the last decade and high-profile retirements since have also had an impact on viewership. Ashok Malik, in Asian Age, wonders if a saturation has been reached, especially with other sports enticing the average fan.

Cricket viewership, even Indian Premier League viewership, is not growing. It has either reached a ceiling (IPL) or a floor (Test cricket). Even limited-overs cricket (the Fifty50) game, the mainstay of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), is showing a worrying pattern. On-ground presence is lower than previously. The BCCI is masking it by hosting matches mainly in smaller cities and towns, where the novelty may still be there. As for television, a comparison between the India-West Indies limited-overs series of 2011 and 2013 would be telling. Both series were played in India. The first was played in the aftermath of India's World Cup victory and showed a TRP of 3.4 (male/15-34/Sec A, B and C). By the 2013 series, the TRP number had fallen to 2.2. TRP figures for the just-concluded (October 2014) India-West Indies series were not immediately available.

OCTOBER 12, 2014

The visceral beauty of fandom

Kartikeya Date: It is the fans' money and attention, and the players' skills and efforts that are indispensable to sport. Investors and broadcasters merely market the show
OCTOBER 09, 2014

Confessions of a Pakistan fan-turned-cynic

Ahmer Naqvi: It is time we accept that the team is a lesser force now, and will be. Highs are momentary, enveloped by a sense of hopelessness
SEPTEMBER 09, 2014

Moeen Ali: England's man of the summer

Kamran Abbasi: He has won respect with his cricket doing the talking, not letting himself be crushed by shameful boos from fans
SEPTEMBER 05, 2014

The unquestioning loyalty of the sports nut

Russell Jackson: True sports fans are like Harley-Davidson loyalists. Poor marketing and tacky innovations will never turn them away from the game they love
SEPTEMBER 01, 2014

The power of booing

Jonathan Wilson: It has value when used against players who have transgressed - particularly if they have somehow offended the spirit of the game
AUGUST 27, 2014

Indian cricket

Is India's connection with fans failing?

India, at least in the latter stages, barely played the kind of cricket that would attract crowds during their recent tour of England. As much hold as the sport has in the country, the efforts of the BCCI to control how much the players share with the media and by extension their fans has resulted in a deterioration of their bond with the people, writes Tanya Aldred in the Telegraph.

And yet for what? It means that Indian fans and the cricket-loving public overseas with a romantic soft spot for India no longer feel such affection for their cricketers. Aside from M S Dhoni and poor Virat Kohli, who could not get a run this summer, how many of the current touring side do people know about? Bhuvneshwar Kumar, a bowler from the scissor-factory town of Meerut in Uttar Pradesh, who did not even have a pair of cricket boots before his under-17 trial and who as a young man bowled Tendulkar for his first first-class duck in Indian domestic cricket? Cheteshwar Pujara, the teenage triple-century sensation who has tried to make his way in Test cricket the old-fashioned way? Without knowledge, will fans support their side when the going gets tough?

AUGUST 20, 2014

Me, my Bapi and Bangladesh cricket

Zeeshan Mahmud: A son recalls the highs that Bangladesh cricket gave him and his father
JUNE 27, 2014

Headingley's challenge to get the crowds back

Dave Hawksworth: The ticket prices were reduced and there was the chance to watch home-grown players in the Test side. What more can Yorkshire do to woo spectators for five-day cricket?
JUNE 25, 2014

Sport's what you make of it

Ahmer Naqvi: The beauty of sport is that it can take on a variety of meanings, depending on where you stand
JUNE 23, 2014

24-carat Tendulkar

The London-based East India Company has released a limited-edition legal tender coin commemorating the career of Sachin Tendulkar. The 24-carat gold coin weighs precisely 200g - to mark the 200 Test matches that Tendulkar played - has the number 187 on it - to mark his Test cap number - and only 210 of them - for unspecified reasons - will go on sale for £12,000 each.

"We had been talking to Tendulkar since last December as we thought it would be the best way to immortalise an exceptional career spanning over 24 years," said Sanjiv Mehta, CEO of the East India Company, speaking to Gulf News. "There were some delays in the way as we had to secure the rights for producing it from the Commonwealth currency issuing authority but it was worth the wait."

Mehta added that the company would also mint coins in "one ounce, one-fourth ounce gold and half-an-ounce silver".

Apart from an autographed bat and a helmet, the coin face also features the Gateway of India to symbolise his hometown Mumbai.

"All my life, I have had a dream of playing cricket for India," Tendulkar said. "I am very fortunate to have lived this dream for the last 24 years. I am honoured to be recognised with the issue of these special coins, which have been impressively designed with a lot of thought."

JUNE 20, 2014

A Derbyshire fan in Melbourne

Russell Jackson: How books, magazines and live scorecard updates allowed an Australian teenager to keep track of county cricket in the 1990s
JUNE 19, 2014

Life outside the cricket stadium

Samir Chopra: Most fans are familiar with far-flung corners of the globe but often we don't know much about those places apart from the fact that they are cricketing venues
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