Nostalgia

SEPTEMBER 12, 2014

Yorkshire feels like Yorkshire again

Dave Hawksworth: Fans born after their era of dominance that ended in the late '60s had grown tired of tales of woe. Their Championship victory finally gives us a reason to brag
The 2014 wins feels sweeter than 2001, given the number of home-grown players delivering crushing wins © Getty Images
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AUGUST 31, 2014

What cricketing memories remain locked in your archive for eternity?

Nicholas Hogg: Your first six? A last-ball victory? The legendary and the quiet moments of your favourite players?
AUGUST 13, 2014

India Women in England 2014

Reliving the triumph of 2006

India Women are set to play a Test after nearly eight years, returning to England where they secured a historic Test triumph on their last tour in 2006. In her blog, Grass on the Seam, India Women's cricketer Snehal Pradhan reminisces about that series and the win at Taunton that was built around Jhulan Goswami's remarkable returns of 5 for 33 and 5 for 45.

To say she sliced through the top order is not an exaggeration. She allowed none of the top three to reach double figures. She came back to pick up the resilient Edwards, who batted low due to illness. To get a measure of the quality of her wickets we need no highlights or eye witness accounts. We only need to read the scorecard. LBW, caught behind and bowled. Beaten, edged, and knocked over. Classic fast bowlers wickets. And she was bowling fast.

AUGUST 08, 2014

Remembering Paul Melville

Russell Jackson: The dashing Victoria batsman was set to be a star for Australia when his life was tragically cut short at 21
JULY 14, 2014

When the weak can resist the strong

Jonathan Wilson: Cricket and football give lesser teams and players a chance to hold out and sometimes even show up stronger opposition
JUNE 20, 2014

A Derbyshire fan in Melbourne

Russell Jackson: How books, magazines and live scorecard updates allowed an Australian teenager to keep track of county cricket in the 1990s
JUNE 15, 2014

Vishy or Sunny? Venky or Pras?

Sankaran Krishna: What sort of interminable arguments have you had with your friends and relatives about cricketers?
JUNE 06, 2014

Offbeat

Green gloves, ducks and bats taped to ceilings

While reviewing Chris Waters' book 10 for 10 - on Hedley Verity's record - for the Guardian, Andy Bull recounts some entertaining stories of superstitions that cricketers have followed.

Others take things further still. Duck seemed so portentous to Steve James that he refused to eat it, and wouldn't even let his children have a rubber one to play with in the bath, until after his career was over. He sympathised with Neil McKenzie, who developed an obsession that meant he would go out to bat only when all the toilet seats were down, and even went through a phase of taping his bat to the ceiling because his team-mates had once done that to him on a day when he scored a century.

JUNE 06, 2014

The generous lender of cricket magazines

Samir Chopra: Having a neighbour with a cornucopia of cricket literature can be a life-changing experience
MAY 26, 2014

The boys of endless summer

Sankaran Krishna: All grace, good looks and charisma, Farokh Engineer, Salim Durani and ML Jaisimha epitomised the charms of a bygone age
MAY 24, 2014

The absent cricket ball

Samir Chopra: A cricket ball at home would make daydreaming a little easier; its concrete, tangible presence would make intangible visions easier to construct
MAY 21, 2014

The need for heroes

Nicholas Hogg: Can any modern player fill the gargantuan boots of Botham, Viv Richards or Harold Larwood? Glenn Maxwell is making a mighty fist of it
MAY 16, 2014

Style over statistics

Stuart Wark: Wasim Raja played 57 Tests, scored four centuries, and averaged 36.16. But those numbers don't reveal his value to the side or the joy he brought to those watching
MAY 07, 2014

The last of the long run-up

Jon Hotten: The sight of a fast bowler running in from a distance, sometimes starting in a position only vaguely related to the position of the wicket, is a thrilling one. And it's increasingly rare now
MAY 02, 2014

My Caribbean friend

Samir Chopra: How tales of West Indies cricket helped forge an enduring friendship between an Indian professor and a Jamaican security guard
APRIL 30, 2014

Women's cricket

The remarkable arc of women's cricket in England

Joe Wilson in BBC Sport traces the remarkable arc of women's cricket in England, comparing the times in which former allrounder Enid Bakewell and current England captain Charlotte Edwards have played their cricket. Of the many memories Bakewell has in her rich career, one is of playing a Test against Australia at Lord's in the 1970s, when the famed Long Room was open only to men.

"It wasn't until 1976 that Lord's let us have a televised match there, and when we first went there I don't think they were going to allow a woman in the scorebox," she says.

"We didn't know if we could use the changing rooms, and we certainly didn't know if we could go through the Long Room. The Aussies didn't know about the tradition of the Long Room, so they walked through - and we followed them."

APRIL 14, 2014

The finest of Sri Lanka's early years

Stuart Wark: In the '80s, the classy Roy Dias gave stability to a Sri Lankan batting line-up that had to compete against teams with far greater experience and depth
APRIL 11, 2014

England cricket

When Kent threatened to end cricket

Justin Parkinson, political reporter for the BBC, takes us through the history of cricket ball manufacture in the UK. From April 1914 when workers from west Kent threatened to hold the cricket season hostage by not producing any more balls until they were reimbursed appropriately. At the time they had been supplying the best quality for over 150 years, but as the 20th century wore on the monopoly went into steady decline.

Kent's ball manufacturers employed several hundred people at the time, many of whom complained of being treated like "sweated labour".

"The power of the union may be largely a thing of the past, and cricket ball manufacture, along with pretty much everything else in cricket, has now largely moved to the subcontinent", says Matt Thacker, managing editor of The Nightwatchman, the Wisden Cricket Quarterly magazine."But it's great to be reminded occasionally how deeply ingrained into the fabric of English life cricket was.

APRIL 10, 2014

Test-match moments I won't forget

Sankaran Krishna: The scorecards of these three Tests reveal fairly one-sided games, but that wasn't the case if you had been there
APRIL 05, 2014

Indian cricket

Wadekar's shoes and a Karnataka triumph

In the Telegraph, historian Ramachandra Guha reminisces about Karnataka's semi-final against Bombay in March 1974, en route to their first Ranji Trophy title. Guha writes that Karnataka beat Bombay in that game (on first-innings basis) due to two human errors - the first an umpiring decision that went in favour of Gundappa Viswanath off the first ball he faced; and Ajit Wadekar's slip, which resulted in his run-out and allowed Karnataka to take a lead.

Some 20 years after I watched Karnataka defeat Bombay for the first time, I met Ajit Wadekar at a reception in New Delhi. I reminded him about the match and how he had got out, adding that had he not slipped he would still be batting at the Chinnaswamy Stadium. His answer, offered with a laconic shrug of the shoulders, was: "New shoes."

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