MARCH 02, 2015

Napier shows us World Cup joy

Will Macpherson: Outside the tournament venues, New Zealand is welcoming fans to enjoy its beauty and its cricket, nowhere more heart-warmingly than at Clifton Cricket Club
Former players and fans came to celebrate the game at Clifton © Will Macpherson
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FEBRUARY 23, 2015

What's with all the talk about Pakistan's lack of heart?

Hassan Cheema: It seems fashionable when they fail to blame it on an absence of passion; the real reasons are probably much more prosaic
FEBRUARY 17, 2015

Let's embrace all of cricket's ages

Jon Hotten: Peter Willey and George Sharp's dispute with the ECB highlights how we tend to look at what people can't do after a certain age rather than what they can do better
JANUARY 03, 2015

Just what is the Australian way?

Russell Jackson: It's not as easily defined as just saying it is about playing positive, aggressive cricket at all times
DECEMBER 07, 2014

Healing by putting your bat out

Russell Jackson: Touching tributes by strangers all over the world have helped immensely in recovering from the pain of Phillip Hughes' death
DECEMBER 05, 2014

Grieving for a stranger

Samir Chopra: Not having known Phillip Hughes does not make the pain of losing him hurt less
NOVEMBER 27, 2014

A song called Younis

Ahmer Naqvi: For a country torn by internal strife, he offers hope with his magnanimity, humility and cheerful disposition
NOVEMBER 08, 2014

In praise of those who don't set the pulse racing

Ahmer Naqvi: Pakistan cricket has largely been about celebrating the winners, the mercurial, the flamboyant, but its current success has been built on players who are largely the opposite
NOVEMBER 02, 2014

A village state of mind

Vithushan Ehantharajah: There's something to be said for being unsure of cricket, its whims and unwritten rules, but wanting more, and playing on regardless
OCTOBER 19, 2014

Broadcasting

Has cricket hit the roof?

Cricket's dominance in India might not be fading just yet, but the team's performance has not been as compelling as the last decade and high-profile retirements since have also had an impact on viewership. Ashok Malik, in Asian Age, wonders if a saturation has been reached, especially with other sports enticing the average fan.

Cricket viewership, even Indian Premier League viewership, is not growing. It has either reached a ceiling (IPL) or a floor (Test cricket). Even limited-overs cricket (the Fifty50) game, the mainstay of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), is showing a worrying pattern. On-ground presence is lower than previously. The BCCI is masking it by hosting matches mainly in smaller cities and towns, where the novelty may still be there. As for television, a comparison between the India-West Indies limited-overs series of 2011 and 2013 would be telling. Both series were played in India. The first was played in the aftermath of India's World Cup victory and showed a TRP of 3.4 (male/15-34/Sec A, B and C). By the 2013 series, the TRP number had fallen to 2.2. TRP figures for the just-concluded (October 2014) India-West Indies series were not immediately available.

OCTOBER 18, 2014

The gentlemen of the village green

Michael Jeh: A tribute to men for whom a game of cricket was just that
OCTOBER 16, 2014

What is defined as bullying on a sporting field?

Nicholas Hogg: Standing up to an intimidating opposition rather than complaining about them might be an old-school attitude, but it's still relevant
SEPTEMBER 16, 2014

Offbeat

The nature v nurture debate in cricket

In an article for Aeon magazine, David Papineau explores the idea of nature v nurture in cricket by comparing it with other sports and examines whether genetic qualities plays a bigger role in the development of cricketers than environment.

If environments matter more in cricket than in soccer, then this makes cricketing skills look less genetically heritable than footballing ones. In football, most of the differences come from genetic advantages just because there aren't many environmental differences (if you live in a soccer-mad nation, opportunities to play are everywhere). But in cricket, there would still be a wide range of abilities even if everybody had exactly the same genetic endowment, because only some children would get a proper chance to learn the game. In effect, environmental causes are doing a lot more to spread out the children in cricket than they are in football. To sum up, cricket runs in families precisely because the genetic heritability of cricket skills is relatively low.

SEPTEMBER 14, 2014

The Lahoris in the Champions League

Hassan Cheema: They don't quite inspire the awe that their legendary predecessors did, but they will do well if they keep the cricketing traditions of the city alive
SEPTEMBER 01, 2014

The power of booing

Jonathan Wilson: It has value when used against players who have transgressed - particularly if they have somehow offended the spirit of the game
AUGUST 27, 2014

All hail the new, macho Fawad Alam

Ahmer Naqvi: He had phenomenal numbers before he sprouted luxuriant facial hair, but it seems Pakistanis have started to take him seriously only now
JULY 10, 2014

The value of a cricketer's brand

Michael Jeh: Andrew Strauss will recover from the indiscreet remark he made about Kevin Pietersen, but his image won't be entirely as it was
JULY 01, 2014

Catching practice with South Africa

Firdose Moonda in Colombo: South Africa train Sri Lankan schoolchildren to raise money for the country's blind team
JUNE 24, 2014

In quest of the ideal junior coaching system

Michael Jeh: More Australian states should look at the model created by NSW and Victoria
JUNE 06, 2014

Offbeat

Green gloves, ducks and bats taped to ceilings

While reviewing Chris Waters' book 10 for 10 - on Hedley Verity's record - for the Guardian, Andy Bull recounts some entertaining stories of superstitions that cricketers have followed.

Others take things further still. Duck seemed so portentous to Steve James that he refused to eat it, and wouldn't even let his children have a rubber one to play with in the bath, until after his career was over. He sympathised with Neil McKenzie, who developed an obsession that meant he would go out to bat only when all the toilet seats were down, and even went through a phase of taping his bat to the ceiling because his team-mates had once done that to him on a day when he scored a century.

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