The Daryl Harper review howler January 18, 2010

'Want an argument for reviews? Put Harper on the field'

Cricinfo staff
England seethed after they found Daryl Harper hadn't heard a nick off Graeme Smith's bat because the volume on his system was not turned up

"I am not surprised he didn't hear it, because he didn't turn the volume up on his speaker. I find it strange if you are listening for a nick you don't turn the volume up on your speaker."
England coach Andy Flower insists the decision to give Graeme Smith not out was the wrong one

"It's not my job to discuss what the third umpire heard. We all knew what technology was available in this series, so to be crying over spilt milk now is not right."
Graeme Smith begs to differ

"If the audio level had been increased above its optimum level, distortion on the audio feed would have occurred and the feed might not have given a clear indication of the true sound."
ICC match referee Roshan Mahanama explains why Harper did not hear a nick while carrying out the review

"Until the technology is applied correctly we are better off with our oldest method. If the umpire is as deaf as a post and as blind as a bat, at least it's the same for both sides."
England board chairman Giles Clarke would prefer to leave it all to the men on the field

"If you want an argument in favour of the review system, put Harper on the field; if you want an argument against the system, put Harper in the third umpire's booth."
The Times' Simon Barnes doesn't think technology is at fault here

"There is room for further improvement in the available technology and this investigation will be conducted in that light so the system becomes even more reliable."
Haroon Lorgat, the ICC's chief executive, tries to soothe frayed nerves

"The review system is a little clunky… but the game is better for new technology and that will become more obvious in due course."
The Guardian's Paul Weaver thinks wait-and-watch is the way to go

"It's a pity there's no 'Snicko', which would have given Harper another means of checking. Hotspot isn't being used here as there are only a couple of pieces of available equipment in the world that do the job and both are booked."
Paul Smit, an SABC technician thinks more technology is needed

"This is why FIFA and UEFA have served the game well by resisting demands for a referral system and "goalline technology"."
The Times' chief football commentator Patrick Barclay can't hide his relief that football is still free of such tools