August 7, 2014

The old-world virtue of Younis Khan

There's something dated, and comforting, about the security he represents for Pakistan, and when he is gone they will be truly bereft
54

Maybe I'm getting old but these days a Younis Khan hundred hits a sweeter spot than usual inside me. Somehow, when he scores a hundred the whole of Pakistan cricket feels like a more secure, comforting place. Hell, even the whole of Pakistan seems like a safer, more welcoming place. His hundreds are like a motion-sickness prevention pill, after which all the winding, roundabout insanity of Pakistan cricket matters less and less. Who's retiring? Who's in court? Who's the chairman? What's the domestic structure? Who cares? Younis is in.

I guess it's natural to start feeling like this now that he is coming to the end of his career. He wants to play in next year's World Cup and he may play on another year, maybe two, maybe even three, of Test cricket. But he's basically going to be gone soon. And then the one link Pakistan has to a past that it doesn't fetishise enough will be gone too: Misbah-ul-Haq is from the same space spiritually, he is older and the captain as well, but everyone knows Younis is the real institution in the side.

Don't get me wrong. Younis is very much a modern Pakistan product. But the ethos by which he has played his cricket - at every level - has always pre-dated the mores that have defined the period in which he has played. It is easy to imagine Younis as a cricketer in 1970s Pakistan; on the verge of superstardom, fighting for the economic rights of his comrades, nobly tending to local cricket. Some time ago he was talking about starting up a grassroots club in Karachi, where he could breed a certain kind of cricket culture - the kind that he represents. Who does that anymore, especially when it is more profitable to buy a franchise? He still turns up for his domestic side as often as he can, and his excursions into domestic cricket abroad have always been in the four-day formats. If Pakistan ever does get serious about setting up a players' association, you can be sure he will be right at its centre.

Even the stories involving potential violence from his early career sound somehow safer now. He used to travel to his Karachi club, the legendary Malir Gymkhana, through conflict-ridden areas of Karachi, on crowded buses that were lucky not to be struck by bullets. The city's inflammability of that era I could at least understand: to be in danger, generally you had to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, between warring political parties or ethnicities in specific areas. There was order to that, even if it was bloody and brutal. Now it feels like the whole country is in the wrong place at the wrong time. The violence is bloodier, more brutal, and worst of all, random.

That sense is what I've gradually come to love most about Younis, that he is the fading echo of a more wholesome time. I sense it every time he bats with an Asad Shafiq or an Azhar Ali, for whom he isn't so much a batting partner as a counselor or a guide. Much more than run-making, he is teaching them about resilience. He is teaching them how to soak up the pressures of the insecure early existence of a Pakistan international, and how to survive an environment where a young player is not an asset but a cheap, expendable resource.

He had to learn it himself. He had to learn - though he still hasn't fully - which battles to pick and which to ignore. It wasn't until 2005, after all, that he became secure in the side, five years after his debut. That moment came after a Test hundred in Kolkata, when a realisation struck him: "Even if I didn't succeed," he said in an interview after that India tour, "it wouldn't matter. I've always wanted to play good cricket - I don't want to play more, but try and play with my dignity intact."

One day soon Pakistan will field a team in which nobody has played Test cricket in Pakistan, and that is when I think the virtue of Younis Khan will become clear

By modern measures, it's kind of ridiculous that he has only played 90 Tests in 15 years (Alastair Cook is beginning his 107th in eight years today). But back in 2002-03 few - including Younis - would have thought he would get even that many. Perhaps that is what he wants Shafiq and Azhar to understand the most. He has lived through 15 of the grimiest years in Pakistan's cricket, a fair shit-storm of an age, and sure, there's a spot or two on his whites, but they are mostly still white. If he can teach Shafiq, Azhar and anyone else how to do that, it will really be something.

This latest hundred itself? It hardly mattered how it was made, except that it progressed like many of his hundreds, like the trajectory of his career, in fact: a becalmed start, fortunate to survive, but increasingly assured as it went on. I used to think he was too fidgety and skittish to ever be the rock that Pakistan needed, forever in perpetual, slightly neurotic motion at the crease. Mohammad Yousuf and Inzamam-ul-Haq, by contrast, were so still that they were obviously gifted. But Younis managed just fine. Statistically at least he is getting to be the equal of both.

In my older and more partial moments (usually when considering his slip catching and the fact that he stands a couple away from becoming the first Pakistani to 100 Test snaffles) he may even sneak ahead. He saved Pakistan on the first day, as he has done, not always, but enough times for all of us to feel sure and secure around him.

I'm going to bottle up that glow because one day soon Pakistan will field a team in which nobody has played Test cricket in Pakistan, and that is when I think the virtue of Younis Khan will become clear. For a team that has no home, the late-career hundreds of Younis Khan have felt like home. Only when he's gone will Pakistan be truly homeless.

Osman Samiuddin is a sportswriter at the National

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • kaiser1 on August 8, 2014, 2:45 GMT

    I am moved by your Article about Great Khan, Younis Khan .I would greatly appreciate if you take up the issue of Ahmed Jamal who was chosen as the Fastest speedster in the country only a year ago but he has since been ignored into oblivion by the selectors. He is already 25 and getting older day by day. When will he be considered for national duty? If you do that i will be Humbled and Truly Thankful. Whats the use of spending loads of money from the Exchequer to fond the real talent and then wasting the talent as if he nothing. Thank you Bhai Osman.

  • on August 7, 2014, 14:03 GMT

    Excellent article by Mr. Samiuddin. The finals words, "For a team that has no home, the late-career hundreds of Younis Khan have felt like home. Only when he's gone will Pakistan be truly homeless" sum it all. In 90 Tests so far, same as M. Yousuf, he has scored 7576 runs - 46 more than Yousuf - and averages 52.24. Yousuf's careers average is 52.29, Inzamam's 49.60 and that of Great Miandad is 52.57. Therefore, Younis easily is among the great Pakistani batsmen of all times. I just wish that he plays for at least another 4 years, and he should as he's only 36.

  • gujratwalla on August 7, 2014, 11:34 GMT

    My respect for Younis dates from the 267 he made against India in Bangalore 2005.He has since then played many fine innings but that first impression was lasting.Several times i have seen him throw away his wicket needlessly but many times he has taken his side to win or save the match.There is calm and intense courage inherent in the man that belies his Pathan roots.For me he has always represented a man proud of his country and determined to serve it as best as he can.His time will come of course but those who are associated with him will long remember his courage and resillence.He reminds me a lot of Hanif Muhammad...Pakistan first,last and forever.

  • Usmanghani1981 on August 7, 2014, 4:30 GMT

    Osman expressed it so beautifully the way a fan feels about these rare glory moments in middle of struggling times and it really did hit me at sweeter spot inside when he ran for the 100th run .. so comforting for a fan who never got out of a 1992 WC final and doesn't want to accept that our cricket is going through the worst time in country's playing history which would have been unimaginable 15 years back .. but thats how any fan would feel.

    It may look biased but Younus is the most resilient cricketer of our times - and may be the most unsung performer as well - but it doesnt matter as he keeps making us proud by his resilience and greatness of the character.

  • Beertjie on August 12, 2014, 19:03 GMT

    A wonderfully appropriate tribute to a modern great. Long live the spirit of Younis Khan: dignity and respect!

  • on August 11, 2014, 19:29 GMT

    Excellent article, great job done. Pakistan is very unfortunate not to play too many test /odi's under Younis Khan's captaincy. He is a dedicated player and honest leader and he would have developed fighting cricketers if he had captained the side more like Imran khan developed Inzamam, Waseem n Waqar after his retirement.

  • zarasochozarasamjho on August 9, 2014, 11:58 GMT

    Another excellent article by Osman - touched my heart too. Essentialy, you are talking of a TEST batsman, which is a very rare commodity in Pakistan (since the 70's and early 80's). The fact that you also refer to Asad Shafiq and Azhar Ali and not others is also because these too are TEST batsmen; not quite of the calibre of Younis, but hopefully shal get there. Your article also correctly points out that many of the performances of Asad and Azhar have been while batting with Younis (and Misbah too) because of an assuring reliance needed to stay at the wicket in tough conditions. Hopefully these two would have matured by the time Younis and Misbah leave Pakistan cricket. There is no other TEST batsmen in Pakistan cricket and this will hurt Pakistan's performances in TEST cricket, which is the ONLY TRUE cricket form.

  • t20cric on August 8, 2014, 17:30 GMT

    @haqster499: Don't you think 7 bowling options is a bit overkill. If you're going to make Younis open then drop Hafeez, push Misbah and Umar one spot down and put Fawad Alam in at 4. Remember the world cup is happening in Australia so 3 spinners aren't needed. I think the wc squad should be: Ahmed Shehzad, Younis Khan, Misbah-ul-haq, Sohaib Maqsood, Umar Akmal, Fawad Alam, Saeed Ajmal, Junaid Khan, Mohammad Irfan, Shahid Afridi, Hammad Azam, Anwar Ali, Sharjeel Khan, Umar Gul, Wahab Riaz. I'm saying Wahab Riaz because I believe that Waqar Younis can make him a Pakistani Mitchell Johnson.

  • StoneRose on August 8, 2014, 17:08 GMT

    From an England fan, his 2nd inns hundred in the 3rd Test at Dubai on England's last tur there was majestic. On that day I could imagine him counselling Azhar Ali as the author states. Given everything that has happened to hm and Pakistani cricket in the last ten years, he is a modern great.

  • on August 8, 2014, 12:11 GMT

    As we turn older, (is 36 really OLD???), the value of more and more things dawn on us. I used to abhor his batting style which seemed way, way too heavy around the loose limbed shots and the bloody sweep. I remember my analogy that he was to Muhammad Yousuf, what Chanderpaul was to B.C. Lara: the ugly crow in the presence of the most regal of swans. Time has however changed that. Muhammad Yousuf, sadly, no longer mesmerises us and also Younis is all that we, the forlorn Pakistan OLD cricket enthusiasts seemingly have left. Ryan Giggs has finally hung his holy boots and the pressure on Misbah is unfairly immense to make way. Younis has outlived the storms and long may this continue. Osman has almost brought a nostalgic tear to the eyes.

  • kaiser1 on August 8, 2014, 2:45 GMT

    I am moved by your Article about Great Khan, Younis Khan .I would greatly appreciate if you take up the issue of Ahmed Jamal who was chosen as the Fastest speedster in the country only a year ago but he has since been ignored into oblivion by the selectors. He is already 25 and getting older day by day. When will he be considered for national duty? If you do that i will be Humbled and Truly Thankful. Whats the use of spending loads of money from the Exchequer to fond the real talent and then wasting the talent as if he nothing. Thank you Bhai Osman.

  • on August 7, 2014, 14:03 GMT

    Excellent article by Mr. Samiuddin. The finals words, "For a team that has no home, the late-career hundreds of Younis Khan have felt like home. Only when he's gone will Pakistan be truly homeless" sum it all. In 90 Tests so far, same as M. Yousuf, he has scored 7576 runs - 46 more than Yousuf - and averages 52.24. Yousuf's careers average is 52.29, Inzamam's 49.60 and that of Great Miandad is 52.57. Therefore, Younis easily is among the great Pakistani batsmen of all times. I just wish that he plays for at least another 4 years, and he should as he's only 36.

  • gujratwalla on August 7, 2014, 11:34 GMT

    My respect for Younis dates from the 267 he made against India in Bangalore 2005.He has since then played many fine innings but that first impression was lasting.Several times i have seen him throw away his wicket needlessly but many times he has taken his side to win or save the match.There is calm and intense courage inherent in the man that belies his Pathan roots.For me he has always represented a man proud of his country and determined to serve it as best as he can.His time will come of course but those who are associated with him will long remember his courage and resillence.He reminds me a lot of Hanif Muhammad...Pakistan first,last and forever.

  • Usmanghani1981 on August 7, 2014, 4:30 GMT

    Osman expressed it so beautifully the way a fan feels about these rare glory moments in middle of struggling times and it really did hit me at sweeter spot inside when he ran for the 100th run .. so comforting for a fan who never got out of a 1992 WC final and doesn't want to accept that our cricket is going through the worst time in country's playing history which would have been unimaginable 15 years back .. but thats how any fan would feel.

    It may look biased but Younus is the most resilient cricketer of our times - and may be the most unsung performer as well - but it doesnt matter as he keeps making us proud by his resilience and greatness of the character.

  • Beertjie on August 12, 2014, 19:03 GMT

    A wonderfully appropriate tribute to a modern great. Long live the spirit of Younis Khan: dignity and respect!

  • on August 11, 2014, 19:29 GMT

    Excellent article, great job done. Pakistan is very unfortunate not to play too many test /odi's under Younis Khan's captaincy. He is a dedicated player and honest leader and he would have developed fighting cricketers if he had captained the side more like Imran khan developed Inzamam, Waseem n Waqar after his retirement.

  • zarasochozarasamjho on August 9, 2014, 11:58 GMT

    Another excellent article by Osman - touched my heart too. Essentialy, you are talking of a TEST batsman, which is a very rare commodity in Pakistan (since the 70's and early 80's). The fact that you also refer to Asad Shafiq and Azhar Ali and not others is also because these too are TEST batsmen; not quite of the calibre of Younis, but hopefully shal get there. Your article also correctly points out that many of the performances of Asad and Azhar have been while batting with Younis (and Misbah too) because of an assuring reliance needed to stay at the wicket in tough conditions. Hopefully these two would have matured by the time Younis and Misbah leave Pakistan cricket. There is no other TEST batsmen in Pakistan cricket and this will hurt Pakistan's performances in TEST cricket, which is the ONLY TRUE cricket form.

  • t20cric on August 8, 2014, 17:30 GMT

    @haqster499: Don't you think 7 bowling options is a bit overkill. If you're going to make Younis open then drop Hafeez, push Misbah and Umar one spot down and put Fawad Alam in at 4. Remember the world cup is happening in Australia so 3 spinners aren't needed. I think the wc squad should be: Ahmed Shehzad, Younis Khan, Misbah-ul-haq, Sohaib Maqsood, Umar Akmal, Fawad Alam, Saeed Ajmal, Junaid Khan, Mohammad Irfan, Shahid Afridi, Hammad Azam, Anwar Ali, Sharjeel Khan, Umar Gul, Wahab Riaz. I'm saying Wahab Riaz because I believe that Waqar Younis can make him a Pakistani Mitchell Johnson.

  • StoneRose on August 8, 2014, 17:08 GMT

    From an England fan, his 2nd inns hundred in the 3rd Test at Dubai on England's last tur there was majestic. On that day I could imagine him counselling Azhar Ali as the author states. Given everything that has happened to hm and Pakistani cricket in the last ten years, he is a modern great.

  • on August 8, 2014, 12:11 GMT

    As we turn older, (is 36 really OLD???), the value of more and more things dawn on us. I used to abhor his batting style which seemed way, way too heavy around the loose limbed shots and the bloody sweep. I remember my analogy that he was to Muhammad Yousuf, what Chanderpaul was to B.C. Lara: the ugly crow in the presence of the most regal of swans. Time has however changed that. Muhammad Yousuf, sadly, no longer mesmerises us and also Younis is all that we, the forlorn Pakistan OLD cricket enthusiasts seemingly have left. Ryan Giggs has finally hung his holy boots and the pressure on Misbah is unfairly immense to make way. Younis has outlived the storms and long may this continue. Osman has almost brought a nostalgic tear to the eyes.

  • Naresh28 on August 8, 2014, 6:46 GMT

    WELL DONE YOUNIS KHAN - you are there amongst the best - there is no doubt. Indian fan.

  • haqster499 on August 8, 2014, 5:50 GMT

    World cup is round the corner in Aus where most of our players have not played.

    I would start getting Younis Khan to open in ODIs with Ahmed Shahzad. He's always coming in early anyway -- why dont we put him at No1 in his ODI comeback? He can stablize the innings, see off the new ball and the other batsman should bat around him. He can take the singles, doubles and guide the youngsters in the middle on bouncy wickets. Plus he is great in the field.

    ODI team: Ahmed Shahzad, Younis Khan, Sohaib Maqsood, Misbah, Umar Akmal, Mohammad Hafeez, Afridi, Bilalwal Bhatti, Umar Gul, Saeed Ajmal, Junaid Khan or Mohammad Irfan

  • Desihungama on August 8, 2014, 4:18 GMT

    The poignancy in your article is truly heart wrenching. And I thought calling desert our home was diabolic. This love affair with Team Pakistan has cost the fan dearly.

  • krishna_cricketfan on August 8, 2014, 4:00 GMT

    Younis Khan again and again comes out and play the kind of innings that is truly Test match play. That rock solid batsmanship is not easy anymore for the new generation of batsman. He is right up there with the graceful and calm Inzi and Zaheer and of course the smart , never say die Javed. Pakistan needs 3 more Younis to do well in Tests.

  • on August 7, 2014, 20:25 GMT

    Osman you produce wonders when you write just like when wasim used to when he bowled !!! Well Done Osman !!! Its so unfortunate that younis khan who was tipped by Imran Khan as the future captain and the who has won the t 20 world cup has been wasted as a captain for Pakistan cricket team by our administrators.

  • on August 7, 2014, 20:04 GMT

    AMAZING article !!

    Hands down Mr. Samiuddin. One of the most authentic n well written article which is true to bits.

    Younis Khan: LEGEND.

  • Herath-UK on August 7, 2014, 20:04 GMT

    Younis has scored well against Sri Lanka in many a time just like Sanga doing against them. Hope Sanga will do one like Younis tomorrow.

  • on August 7, 2014, 19:42 GMT

    what an article man!! truly the most underrated performer for Pakistan over the years. I used to like him even during Inzi and Yusuf days. but now with those gone there is only he to fill that void. hard to imagine a Pakistan team without him

  • InamKhattak60 on August 7, 2014, 19:31 GMT

    an excellent article ... we need cricket in our country

  • on August 7, 2014, 18:31 GMT

    I won't deny it - I was teary eyed, so overcome was it with the glow of emotion by the time I read the last line....

    A master-piece about a grossly under-rated maestro....

  • on August 7, 2014, 16:39 GMT

    Worth a read. Truly explicates the class in which Younis falls in and the talent that he possesses.

  • on August 7, 2014, 16:18 GMT

    Earlier I used to wonder with that technique almost like Chanderpaul how he could survive, but with every passing runs you recognize what a legend and a leader for Pakistan he is. Respect from a fan in India. India had Sachin, Saurav, Dravid and Laxman and Pakistan had Inzi, Yousuf and Younis , truly golden period.

  • on August 7, 2014, 16:15 GMT

    The most under rated, least praised of Pak bat greats...his record speaks foritself n puts him right up there with JM, INZI n YSF....of course, his brilliance in the field gives him an advantage espcly over Inzi n Yousaf..

  • Tornado1 on August 7, 2014, 15:39 GMT

    Younus is a legend. He is mentally as strong as Miandad, may not be the greatest Pakistan ever produced but respectful. He equals the world record for 4th innings hundred as well in a short career as compared to the others. Loved his century yesterday, would love him to break Inzi's record.

  • on August 7, 2014, 15:35 GMT

    "one day soon Pakistan will field a team in which nobody has played Test cricket in Pakistan, and that is when I think the virtue of Younis Khan will become clear. For a team that has no home, the late-career hundreds of Younis Khan have felt like home. Only when he's gone will Pakistan be truly homeless." Indeed

  • on August 7, 2014, 15:22 GMT

    This is one of the most beautifully crafted article about a player who represents a class sprouted through hardwork, resilience and self determination. I can guarantee if any individual wishes to overview younis khan,s career then this article would be a crystal clear solution. Kuddos to Mr. Osman :-)

  • khanc on August 7, 2014, 15:03 GMT

    Younis Khan has been probably the most underrated batsman in the world, and would be considered a modern great if he played more during his career. An excellent article.

  • mrhamilton on August 7, 2014, 14:00 GMT

    Osman it's disrespectful to suggest younis khan is the heartbeat of the team over misbah.misbah is the one who represents calm and unity and he is more consistent and avoids controversy.I can see misbah going on for 2-3 years.

  • Equanimous on August 7, 2014, 12:42 GMT

    I did not get to see this hundred but it must have been a great one to inspire such a great article. Poetic. Congratulations to younis. A true servant of Pakistan cricket.

  • newnomi on August 7, 2014, 12:38 GMT

    Yes, when "Younis is in", he does bring security and comfort. And also dignity and grace. Well written, Osman.

  • on August 7, 2014, 11:27 GMT

    Well written and apt. A player from the yesteryear's. I was actually comparing his century conversion rate with his current contemporaries (sanga, amla, clarke, cook, mahela) and Younis ranks third behind Sanga and Hash.World cricket certainly respects him, but due credit should be given to him for his achievements. Plus he is two away from being the first Pakistani too 100 catches in tests. No mean feat.

  • on August 7, 2014, 10:27 GMT

    He is truely a great batsman. Always under-rated.

  • on August 7, 2014, 9:20 GMT

    This is a very touching article. I hadn't read any for so much time.

  • on August 7, 2014, 9:13 GMT

    Only when he's gone will Pakistan be truly homeless----indeed!

  • Dielo on August 7, 2014, 9:11 GMT

    Welcome back Younis !! Chalk one for the good guys.

  • on August 7, 2014, 8:15 GMT

    This is a very nice and touching article. Younis is a truly great player and his contribution to Pakistan Cricket is immense. He has been underrated for most of his career. I rate Younis higher than M Yousuf as the latter mostly succeeded against the weaker opponents of his time. Younis has been the backbone of his team for the last 6 or 7 years. I hope he goes on for a few more years from now.

  • on August 7, 2014, 7:39 GMT

    Truely heart touching post. Another good one from you osman. Younis is the rock of our batting. And he is not there for so long for our team to rescue them everytime they collapse. He is a great model for youngsters. A hero. A legend. An inspiration. Younis khan you'll be missed so much. Even to think about our batting lineup without him making me sad :(

  • csr11 on August 7, 2014, 7:34 GMT

    this is brilliantly poignant Osman.

    to my pakistani friends, all i can say is - enjoy it and cherish it while it lasts, gems like Younis and Misbah are rare. these guys along with the likes of dravid, laxman and sachin are images of inspiration.

  • on August 7, 2014, 7:32 GMT

    Truely heart touching post. Younis khan is the rock of our batting. After him where would be our batting!! Youngsters should try to learn from him as much as they can because he is not there for so long to rescue pakistan everytime.

  • Mayar on August 7, 2014, 7:31 GMT

    Osman; Excellent piece of praise however Younis deserve more than that; no one care, neither PCB nor media but thank you for putting some words together! Younis has always been a champion the only patriot player in the team.

  • on August 7, 2014, 7:30 GMT

    Osman....that was so true it broke my heart to read it. You could not be more right. Younis, along with cricketers like Misbah, Afridi and Gul are part of a bygone era, one when international cricket was Pakistan's lifeblood. Younis, perhaps more than any other player of his generation, epitomises the 'never quit' spirit of our countrymen, and it is my hope that we will never truly appreciate his assurance and his presence until he is gone. His secure nature is a breathe of fresh air in this age of fast food cricket, and fills one with the nostalgia of better times in Pakistan.

  • HASEEBZ on August 7, 2014, 7:21 GMT

    Younis khan is one of the greats not only in the Pakistan but all over the world and he proves the same time and again.Take a bow Younus..A very fine article by Osman as well.

  • on August 7, 2014, 7:00 GMT

    The concluding lines brought tears to my eyes. What a fitting tribute to one of the masters of Karachi cricket!

  • on August 7, 2014, 7:00 GMT

    very nicely written. no doubt younas is among the greats pakistan has ever produced. but most of times not praised much. his test record speaks for himself. its a real shame that he has played very less tests in so many years and more likely will not go over 110 matches by the end of career.

  • on August 7, 2014, 6:59 GMT

    younis khan is my all time best after ricky ponting.............

  • on August 7, 2014, 5:12 GMT

    Retro morning feelings. Thanks Osman :) Its a happily saddening feeling I have at the moment. Beautifully written piece here.

  • on August 7, 2014, 5:01 GMT

    Hi Osman,

    Its a good read, as always but I don't fully agree with your 4th paragraph. I think you are exaggerating things. The last paragraph was amazing from literary perspective but made me said to think about. It seems inevitable is coming very soon.

  • on August 7, 2014, 4:57 GMT

    What a player! Hard-working, smiling and a true sportsman.

  • on August 7, 2014, 4:56 GMT

    A beautifully crafted, incisive tribute to a wonderful batsman and person, ever smiling, no matter the many storms at all levels of Pakistan and its cricket swirling around him.

  • on August 7, 2014, 4:54 GMT

    A super Hero in that Pose :) and yeah he is super hero ... sperb written by OSman

  • babubhaiyya on August 7, 2014, 4:48 GMT

    Truly, A man APART !!!!! Highly underrated and mismanaged, but he has defied his odds. A true true Champion. Take a Bow YK

  • on August 7, 2014, 4:44 GMT

    Osman you have missed one thing he is an outfield role model for Pakistan young generation he is undisputed character. Which will encourage the people who have gone away of game due to scandals in past years to start taking interest again. He is true inspiration for youngsters and kids not only sportsmen.

  • afhkhan on August 7, 2014, 4:01 GMT

    What a start to my day...!!!! An excellent article to my favorite cricketer and how well written it is! Indeed Younis Khan has done a yeoman service to Pakistan Cricket and often has been underrated in the shadows of Inzamam or Mohammed Yousuf! But he is true hero and soldier of his team...!!! Hats off to you and may your tribe increase!

  • on August 7, 2014, 3:57 GMT

    I live this guy..true sportsman and very gud player..I want to see him top scorers of Pakistan in test cricket.

  • on August 7, 2014, 3:57 GMT

    I live this guy..true sportsman and very gud player..I want to see him top scorers of Pakistan in test cricket.

  • afhkhan on August 7, 2014, 4:01 GMT

    What a start to my day...!!!! An excellent article to my favorite cricketer and how well written it is! Indeed Younis Khan has done a yeoman service to Pakistan Cricket and often has been underrated in the shadows of Inzamam or Mohammed Yousuf! But he is true hero and soldier of his team...!!! Hats off to you and may your tribe increase!

  • on August 7, 2014, 4:44 GMT

    Osman you have missed one thing he is an outfield role model for Pakistan young generation he is undisputed character. Which will encourage the people who have gone away of game due to scandals in past years to start taking interest again. He is true inspiration for youngsters and kids not only sportsmen.

  • babubhaiyya on August 7, 2014, 4:48 GMT

    Truly, A man APART !!!!! Highly underrated and mismanaged, but he has defied his odds. A true true Champion. Take a Bow YK

  • on August 7, 2014, 4:54 GMT

    A super Hero in that Pose :) and yeah he is super hero ... sperb written by OSman

  • on August 7, 2014, 4:56 GMT

    A beautifully crafted, incisive tribute to a wonderful batsman and person, ever smiling, no matter the many storms at all levels of Pakistan and its cricket swirling around him.

  • on August 7, 2014, 4:57 GMT

    What a player! Hard-working, smiling and a true sportsman.

  • on August 7, 2014, 5:01 GMT

    Hi Osman,

    Its a good read, as always but I don't fully agree with your 4th paragraph. I think you are exaggerating things. The last paragraph was amazing from literary perspective but made me said to think about. It seems inevitable is coming very soon.

  • on August 7, 2014, 5:12 GMT

    Retro morning feelings. Thanks Osman :) Its a happily saddening feeling I have at the moment. Beautifully written piece here.

  • on August 7, 2014, 6:59 GMT

    younis khan is my all time best after ricky ponting.............