The swift turnaround
Martin Guptill first survived a big appeal for leg-before off the third ball of the match. Bangladesh reviewed and lost it; Guptill survived. The Mashrafe Mortaza delivery had pitched and hit the New Zealand opener outside off. But it didn't cost Bangladesh much as Mashrafe struck Guptill's front pad next ball. This time, umpire Paul Reiffel raised his finger immediately. Guptill, however, didn't make the mistake of taking a review, which was later used by Tom Latham for an unsuccessful one for his leg-before decision.
The not-so-swift turnaround
Sabbir Rahman wasn't so lucky with a turnaround. In the 23rd over of Bangladesh's chase, Imrul Kayes dropped the ball towards short cover and set off for a single, only to see Sabbir, who initially responded, sell him a dummy. Not even the sight of his partner turning his back on him prevented Imrul from turning back. He ran straight on and reached the non-striker's end. Conventional wisdom sent Imrul back, but technology in the form of a TV replay showed Imrul had reached the non-striker's end before Sabbir had. Imrul, who nearly walked off, was called back and Sabbir had t make the long walk back.
More turnarounds
The theme continued as Lockie Ferguson dropped Imrul at deep fine leg in the 25th over. He didn't have to move under the miscued skier, but his reverse cup for a catch that low was asking for trouble. Despite two tries, he couldn't complete the catch. In the next over, Ferguson zoomed in a yorker at Mahmudullah's stumps to redeem himself, and produce the game's second swift turnaround.
The deep breath
Nurul Hasan's sudden elevation to the Bangladesh ODI side came through Mushfiqur Rahim's hamstring injury. He became he fifth wicketkeeper to replace Mushfiqur in the last eight years. Given his billing through domestic performances, there was some pressure on young Hasan.
He made his presence felt through a smart stumping to send back James Neesham, who completely missed the ball while charging at a Mosaddek Hossain delivery. Hasan waited for the ball to sit inside his gloves before disturbing the stumps with both hands. Given how flamboyant Hasan usually is behind the stumps, the Neesham stumping looked like a deliberately assured attempt.

Mohammad Isam is ESPNcricinfo's Bangladesh correspondent. @isam84