Expansion of Twenty20

Rajasthan reveal global team deal

Andrew Miller

February 8, 2010

Comments: 25 | Text size: A | A

Plans to create the first global sport alliance were revealed at Lord's with Rajasthan Royals leading the innovation as they joined forces with Hampshire, Cape Cobras and Trinidad and Tobago to form a worldwide Twenty20 brand. The Australian domestic Twenty20 champions, Victoria Bushrangers, are also believed to be close to confirming their participation in the venture.

Shane Warne, captain of the Rajasthan Royals and a former captain of Hampshire and Victoria, was in London to announce the plans alongside Manoj Badale, the London-based businessman who part-owns the IPL franchise, and officials from Hampshire, the Cobras and Trinidad and Tobago.

All of the teams within the deal will henceforth carry the "Royals" moniker, which means that Hampshire Royals (formerly Hawks) will be treading on the toes of their Twenty20 Cup rivals, Worcestershire Royals. The two counties are understood to have already been in discussions.

"This is a major innovation in world sport, and it represents a great opportunity for the clubs," Badale said, "but also an opportunity for fans and sponsors to be part of something totally unique and exciting. The response that we have had from fans overseas over the past two seasons has convinced us to expand our ambition."

The four other domestic teams involved in the tie-up will now play under the Royals name in their respective Twenty20 tournaments and the aim is to grow the brand around the world to give them almost year-round coverage. For the players it could create the chance to ply their trade in the other domestic competitions and opens up the option of talent-sharing between sides.

The concept is still in the planning stage, and the finer details are yet to be firmed up, including Victoria's participation. But Badale confirmed that the intention would ultimately be to roll out the brand to other existing Twenty20 markets in New Zealand, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

"I'm so excited by this," Warne said. "It would be nice to be 20 years younger. I am delighted to be part of this new innovation, and I am excited by what we can achieve, given what we have already achieved. Yet again, the Royals are leading the way. It is bonus that clubs with which I have such deep affection are so involved."

Victoria remain undecided

  • Tony Dodemaide, the chief executive of Cricket Victoria, has said the state is still considering its potential involvement in the Rajasthan Royals plan. "We have received a proposal from the Royals representatives and the concept is an interesting one but we've made no commitments at all," he said.
  • Dodemaide said if Victoria did join the group, the Bushrangers name would be retained in the longer formats of the game. "That's not in the mix at all," he said. "It's specifically around Twenty20. There is no suggestion that our traditional arms of cricket, our Sheffield Shield and Ford Ranger Cup teams will be anything other than Victorian Bushrangers."

Organisers said they were looking to stage the first Royals 2020 "festival" in July during a window in the English season, with Lord's - the venue for the launch - a possible base. Matches in either Australia or South Africa during the Christmas holiday period would then follow in December, with a third tournament earmarked for the Middle East or Jaipur in early 2011. This prospect will invariably lead to more concerns about player burn-out, amid overcrowded schedules.

"I think at international level there's no doubt that they've got scheduling problems," said Sean Morris, the chief executive of Rajasthan. "But I think that Twenty20 cricket is becoming more and more important to the international player. He plays very little of it at the moment, and we want to fit alongside the domestic calendars. There are one or two windows in that, and we don't want to conflict and compete with them."

"When we talk of festivals, it's about the fun aspect, the enjoyment of Twenty20 cricket," said Warne. "As far as the cricket goes, if I'm bowling to Dimitri Mascarenhas and he's playing for Hampshire, I promise you it will be competitive. These will be competitive games that are fun to watch, with a festival atmosphere. Whether it's with cheerleaders, fireworks or music, it's all about the fans having fun."

"The opportunity to be part of a global brand is a unique one across all sports," added Morris. "And it will enable us to take advantage of the changing landscape in cricket, not least in the areas of marketing and talent development."

"There are plenty potential pitfalls," said Badale. "Firstly, we are going to have to ensure we don't fall outside the regulations of the domestic leagues and the cricket boards. Secondly, we have to try not to do too much too quickly. People keep asking us "What is it?" "It's" pretty simple. We're going to have the same kit, over time we're going to have the same name, and we're going to play each other a couple times a year. There are risks, but business is all about risk and return."

Andrew Miller is UK editor of Cricinfo

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© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by saifkl on (February 10, 2010, 2:29 GMT)

Pretty soon there wil be so much cricket that one would not even know the point of it. It will get boring and cricket will lose its attraction. All that will be left will be "cricket shows" instead of meaningful matches.

Posted by MartinAmber on (February 9, 2010, 23:50 GMT)

By far Warne's worst idea since the diuretic, in my view. What isn't pointed out in this article is that Warne would also like international 50-over cricket to be stopped, except for the World Cup. Doesn't matter how much you love and respect Warne or appreciate T20, that could only be the view of a man who has won three World Cups already and now just wants to milk another cash cow in between poker tournaments and lucrative commentary appearances. Yeah, let's have a World Cup every 4 years in a format no-one would ever play. Complete idiocy.

Posted by   on (February 9, 2010, 18:08 GMT)

Another nail in the Test coffin?

Posted by broomstix on (February 9, 2010, 6:48 GMT)

Royal Bushrangers, Royal Cobras...sounds cool

Posted by Rajesh. on (February 9, 2010, 6:40 GMT)

World Cricket and various cricket boards are one confused set of people.... One one hand they bemoan the decline in interests in Test Cricket and to an extent in One-Dayer's as well but on the other hand they try to squeeze in more & more of T20 matches in whatever break that's available now on the international calender. Overdose is an understatement. It's not that I dislike T20 but when are the people that matter going to strike a balance between the different formats of the game.....? Or at least seen to be making an effort to strike a balance

Posted by   on (February 9, 2010, 6:39 GMT)

intersting concept but lets see the implementation before reading much into it

Posted by   on (February 9, 2010, 4:33 GMT)

Interesting idea - but I doubt if the brains inside IPL will approve of this...

Posted by subela on (February 9, 2010, 2:59 GMT)

As it is cricketers are burning out due to intense scheduling, international players barely ever get a chance to play in the domestic circuit. Before IPL started they had scheduling problems, and NOW Mr Sean Morris has found "There are one or two windows in that, and we don't want to conflict and compete with them".

If it were up to him, the entire year would be free, cause he doesn't have to play day in and day out. Its the cricketers who burn out.

On another note, do the viewers really want to watch more domestic T20? IPL was pushing the limit, but to have these exibhition matches once or twice a year between the same teams, who'll watch them?

It seems like International cricket will soon become more along the lines of Soccer, where the only main event is the WC ODI/T20 every 4 years. If so, what about tests?

Posted by subela on (February 9, 2010, 2:50 GMT)

"There are risks, but business is all about risk and return."

I thought cricket was a sport!

Sounds more like "that all the returns are for business man and all the risks are for cricket itself".

Posted by yorvik on (February 9, 2010, 1:17 GMT)

Great news for us in Yorkshire! Hopefully Hampshire will name six Indians and four from Trinidad this summer and get themselves banned. Yorkshire got banned a year ago for playing a 17yr old kid who learn't his trade in Barnsley. If the ECB and ICC are serious about developing and spreading the game they will scupper unholy alliances before they begin.

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Andrew Miller Andrew Miller was saved from a life of drudgery in the City when his car caught fire on the way to an interview. He took this as a sign and fled to Pakistan where he witnessed England's historic victory in the twilight at Karachi (or thought he did, at any rate - it was too dark to tell). He then joined Wisden Online in 2001, and soon graduated from put-upon photocopier to a writer with a penchant for comment and cricket on the subcontinent. In addition to Pakistan, he has covered England tours in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, as well as the World Cup in the Caribbean in 2007
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