Sachin Tendulkar: The Man Cricket Loved Back February 28, 2014

'Sachin a better captain than his results showed' - Ganguly

ESPNcricinfo staff
36

Former India captain Sourav Ganguly has said that Sachin Tendulkar was a better leader than people made him out to be, considering the circumstances under which he captained.

In an article featured in ESPNcricinfo's new anthology, Sachin Tendulkar: The Man Cricket Loved Back, Ganguly writes: "He led on some very tough tours - South Africa, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Australia - and it must be said he didn't lose eight in a row. This when he didn't have a very good team around him. The older players were fading and the newcomers were too raw."

Ganguly, who captained Tendulkar in 143 of the 341 international matches in which the two played together, also writes of the necessity of making allowances for exceptional players like Tendulkar.

"When it came to being Sachin's captain, it was about giving him due respect: treating him like a team-mate but also as the special player he was. He was central to the side doing well. He had to feel relaxed and comfortable."

Tendulkar was unhappy, Ganguly writes, about having to bat at No. 4 in ODIs in 2002-03. "You say, please, do it for a short while; of course you'll be back up, let's see how long it goes. Once he settled down to the idea and saw it work, it was fine. When things went a bit wobbly at the 2003 World Cup, he was back up straight away."

The book contains tributes from other team-mates and coaches who played and worked with Tendulkar, among them Rahul Dravid, VVS Laxman, Yuvraj Singh, John Wright and Greg Chappell.

Dravid, who made a record 6920 Test runs with Tendulkar, writes of how the two had an inauspicious start, when, in their first time batting together in an international, in Singapore in 1996, Dravid was run out. "It wasn't a sign of things to come, though," he continues. "Only three of our 143 partnerships in Test cricket would end as run-outs."

The two played 391 internationals together and developed an almost intuitive understanding of each other's game. "One sure indicator that [Tendulkar] was in good touch was when he played the flick to the leg side," Dravid writes. "Cricket is a game where you naturally have more fielders on the off side, and especially in limited-overs cricket, bowlers like to bowl tight lines… [Tendulkar] would be on his toes, on top of the bounce, and would often beat midwicket to the fielder's right. Sometimes he even beat square leg to his right with that flick, not to the full ball but the ones pitched short of a length. That made you marvel from the other end."

John Wright, who coached India from 2000 to 2005, and also worked with Tendulkar at Mumbai Indians, speaks in the book of Tendulkar's respect for the game and the intensity he brought to his preparation. "A net practice to Sachin was a learning, part of his development as a batsman, which extended to what happened at the game that followed. He was his own coach and his own trainer.

"The time he spent with cricket, he spent with utter focus. [He was] never late - whether for the bus, meetings or nets. It was like going to church or to school; there's no negotiating those timetables. So it was with Sachin's training. The nets were his laboratory, his studio, and once there, he immersed himself."

The book contains analyses of Tendulkar's technique by Aakash Chopra, VVS Laxman, Sanjay Manjrekar, Allan Donald, Mukul Kesavan and Greg Chappell among others.

"What characterised a Tendulkar innings for me was balance and efficiency," Chappell, who coached India in the mid-2000s, writes. "He was rarely rushed, and even the best bowlers found it difficult to keep him quiet for long.

"The cut was my favourite [Tendulkar] shot because he always took the ball at the top of the bounce and struck it with a slightly downward blow, with his weight coming back into the ball. He rarely mistimed the stroke, which says that his reading of length was impeccable."

The book features interviews with Tendulkar down the years (including a joint one with Brian Lara), and articles by a number of leading cricket writers, among them Gideon Haigh, Suresh Menon, Harsha Bhogle, Sharda Ugra, Sidharth Monga, Rahul Bhattacharya, Jon Hotten and Ayaz Memon. The fourth book from ESPNcricinfo, it is published by Penguin Books India, and is available in hard cover and as an ebook.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on March 1, 2014, 9:45 GMT

    Those of us who followed cricket in the 90s know that those days India had almost no world class performers. Although Dravid & Ganguly debuted in 1996, they didn't really blossom and shoulder responsbility till 1999-2000. Azhar was notoriously inconsistent. Kumble was still a force only in the subcontinent. Kambli had come and gone. Tendulkar was all we had. And he was super. It was him versus McGrath, Warne, Donald, Murali, Devon Malcolm, Bishop etc. When we became the captain, he continued to reasonably well himself but he just didn't have the team. Talent wise the test team was much poorer than the teams of Ganguly, Dravid, Kumble and now Dhoni. As a test captain, I wouldn't rate Tendulkar below Dhoni. For me, as far as Indian test captains go, at the top of the list I would have Tiger Pataudi, Gavaskar, Kapil Dev, Ganguly, Kumble ....with Dhoni coming after them. I think we need to have a new test captain like many other teams like ENG, WI etc. who have diff captains for diff frmts

  • on March 4, 2014, 5:30 GMT

    He is a Honourable Man and he was a good captain.

  • EverybodylovesSachin on March 3, 2014, 2:45 GMT

    Sachin never liked captaincy ..he was too nice for that job....

  • Kingman75 on March 2, 2014, 7:52 GMT

    Tendulkar's legacy falling fast after retirement. A lot of people defending his position as great batsmen, great captain, great team player etc. It's hard to take notice of people like Ganguly when the facts simply do not lie. He was a poor captain, seems like he wasn't much of a team player as Ganguly himself says and the only thing he has done as a batsman is be selected more times than warranted to allow him to get his records.

  • LAKINGSFAN on March 2, 2014, 4:35 GMT

    Au contraire, Tendulkar was much poorer as a captain than his record shows,period. Whoever says Tendulkar was a better captain doesn't know anything about captaincy in cricket.

  • on March 2, 2014, 0:09 GMT

    For me the best overseas captain was none other than rahul dravid. Under him India won in England (almost 2-0) and won their first test match in SA, won in WI and after quitting the same side under kumble also competed strongly in Australia. This was a team with Sachin out of form and inconsistent, vvs layman up and down, dhoni just came to the side, sehwag out of form and so was bhajji. All he had was an inexperienced bowling attack in sreesanth, rp singh, munaf patel etc. which did well in such places - batting let India down in SA as well as in MCG against Australia. So he managed bowlers very well.

  • spinkingKK on March 1, 2014, 23:04 GMT

    @Arijit_in_TO, The also-ran Indian team was just maturing when Ganguly took over. In fact, Ganguly had the best Indian team ever to take the field. Tendulkar had a role in that maturing phase. VVS.Laxman, for Instance, could have been dropped for good if it wasn't for Tendulkar to see his immense potential. India was better for all the losses it had under Tendulkar. Having said that, I do agree with you that captaincy is not just about cricketing brain and what you see on the field. But, I can only comment on what I see. I will be a fool if I say Ganguly wasn't a good captain. Ganguly brought in his fantastic attitude to the team. He also understood the strengths of his players. But, not as unbiased as Tendulkar. Ganguly's treatment of Kumble, Murali Karthik and Kambli, when he came back into the team, weren't very good. Dhoni also is a good captain. But only in ODI's. In tests, he is a sleeping captain. In ODI's he is THE BEST.

  • Al_Bundy1 on March 1, 2014, 21:44 GMT

    Tendulkar has to be the worst India captain ever!! Dhoni lost 0-8 against England and Australia because he had deadwood like Tendulkar, Laxman, and Sehwag in his team. Dravid was also a deadwood against Australia. All 4 were way past their prime but chose not to retire to make some extra bucks in the IPL. Tendulkar knew very well that no Indian selector would dare to drop him off the Indian team and he took full advantage of that fact.

  • nareshgb1 on March 1, 2014, 20:02 GMT

    One more thing about Sahin's captaincy: (and really, Ganguly cannot say this out loud) - he had Kapil Dev and Madan Lal as "coach" for the tough tours to SA and Australia. Beat THAT. Further more, there were these selectors who were hell bent on NOT giving him the team he wanted and instead foisting upon him players like Doda Ganesh and "some guy called Johnson".

    On the other hand, once Dada became captain, he basically had the political backing of Dalmiya. And a lot else (including series with Zimbabwe and so on).

  • Arijit_in_TO on March 1, 2014, 14:18 GMT

    I respectfully disagree with spinkingkk on his assessment of Dravid as captain. Dravid was far too deferential to Greg Chappel's quackery and the result was a divisive and divided team whose results were disastrous. Captaincy isn't just about a cricketing brain; if it were then Tendulkar and Dravid would have been amongst the best. Captaincy is also about the type of leadership, management style, strategy, and a tactical nous for the situation. No one captain has all the elements but we need to step back and remember what Indian cricket was when Ganguly inherited it: a mediocre also ran. He wasn't the greatest tactician but John Wright's respect for people and calm demeanour, Ganguly gave chances and brought aggression to the a indian team. I too have watched Indian cricket for a long time and found that Ganguly was the right captain for a more assertive Indian team that was willing to dish it out after years of taking it.

  • on March 1, 2014, 9:45 GMT

    Those of us who followed cricket in the 90s know that those days India had almost no world class performers. Although Dravid & Ganguly debuted in 1996, they didn't really blossom and shoulder responsbility till 1999-2000. Azhar was notoriously inconsistent. Kumble was still a force only in the subcontinent. Kambli had come and gone. Tendulkar was all we had. And he was super. It was him versus McGrath, Warne, Donald, Murali, Devon Malcolm, Bishop etc. When we became the captain, he continued to reasonably well himself but he just didn't have the team. Talent wise the test team was much poorer than the teams of Ganguly, Dravid, Kumble and now Dhoni. As a test captain, I wouldn't rate Tendulkar below Dhoni. For me, as far as Indian test captains go, at the top of the list I would have Tiger Pataudi, Gavaskar, Kapil Dev, Ganguly, Kumble ....with Dhoni coming after them. I think we need to have a new test captain like many other teams like ENG, WI etc. who have diff captains for diff frmts

  • on March 4, 2014, 5:30 GMT

    He is a Honourable Man and he was a good captain.

  • EverybodylovesSachin on March 3, 2014, 2:45 GMT

    Sachin never liked captaincy ..he was too nice for that job....

  • Kingman75 on March 2, 2014, 7:52 GMT

    Tendulkar's legacy falling fast after retirement. A lot of people defending his position as great batsmen, great captain, great team player etc. It's hard to take notice of people like Ganguly when the facts simply do not lie. He was a poor captain, seems like he wasn't much of a team player as Ganguly himself says and the only thing he has done as a batsman is be selected more times than warranted to allow him to get his records.

  • LAKINGSFAN on March 2, 2014, 4:35 GMT

    Au contraire, Tendulkar was much poorer as a captain than his record shows,period. Whoever says Tendulkar was a better captain doesn't know anything about captaincy in cricket.

  • on March 2, 2014, 0:09 GMT

    For me the best overseas captain was none other than rahul dravid. Under him India won in England (almost 2-0) and won their first test match in SA, won in WI and after quitting the same side under kumble also competed strongly in Australia. This was a team with Sachin out of form and inconsistent, vvs layman up and down, dhoni just came to the side, sehwag out of form and so was bhajji. All he had was an inexperienced bowling attack in sreesanth, rp singh, munaf patel etc. which did well in such places - batting let India down in SA as well as in MCG against Australia. So he managed bowlers very well.

  • spinkingKK on March 1, 2014, 23:04 GMT

    @Arijit_in_TO, The also-ran Indian team was just maturing when Ganguly took over. In fact, Ganguly had the best Indian team ever to take the field. Tendulkar had a role in that maturing phase. VVS.Laxman, for Instance, could have been dropped for good if it wasn't for Tendulkar to see his immense potential. India was better for all the losses it had under Tendulkar. Having said that, I do agree with you that captaincy is not just about cricketing brain and what you see on the field. But, I can only comment on what I see. I will be a fool if I say Ganguly wasn't a good captain. Ganguly brought in his fantastic attitude to the team. He also understood the strengths of his players. But, not as unbiased as Tendulkar. Ganguly's treatment of Kumble, Murali Karthik and Kambli, when he came back into the team, weren't very good. Dhoni also is a good captain. But only in ODI's. In tests, he is a sleeping captain. In ODI's he is THE BEST.

  • Al_Bundy1 on March 1, 2014, 21:44 GMT

    Tendulkar has to be the worst India captain ever!! Dhoni lost 0-8 against England and Australia because he had deadwood like Tendulkar, Laxman, and Sehwag in his team. Dravid was also a deadwood against Australia. All 4 were way past their prime but chose not to retire to make some extra bucks in the IPL. Tendulkar knew very well that no Indian selector would dare to drop him off the Indian team and he took full advantage of that fact.

  • nareshgb1 on March 1, 2014, 20:02 GMT

    One more thing about Sahin's captaincy: (and really, Ganguly cannot say this out loud) - he had Kapil Dev and Madan Lal as "coach" for the tough tours to SA and Australia. Beat THAT. Further more, there were these selectors who were hell bent on NOT giving him the team he wanted and instead foisting upon him players like Doda Ganesh and "some guy called Johnson".

    On the other hand, once Dada became captain, he basically had the political backing of Dalmiya. And a lot else (including series with Zimbabwe and so on).

  • Arijit_in_TO on March 1, 2014, 14:18 GMT

    I respectfully disagree with spinkingkk on his assessment of Dravid as captain. Dravid was far too deferential to Greg Chappel's quackery and the result was a divisive and divided team whose results were disastrous. Captaincy isn't just about a cricketing brain; if it were then Tendulkar and Dravid would have been amongst the best. Captaincy is also about the type of leadership, management style, strategy, and a tactical nous for the situation. No one captain has all the elements but we need to step back and remember what Indian cricket was when Ganguly inherited it: a mediocre also ran. He wasn't the greatest tactician but John Wright's respect for people and calm demeanour, Ganguly gave chances and brought aggression to the a indian team. I too have watched Indian cricket for a long time and found that Ganguly was the right captain for a more assertive Indian team that was willing to dish it out after years of taking it.

  • spinkingKK on March 1, 2014, 13:27 GMT

    Tendulkar, indeed, was a good captain. One of the most important qualities in a captain is that he should understand the strength (not weakness) of his players. Tendulkar understood those strength very well. Dhoni will instead understand the weakness of his players and scare them to leave the team. Tendulkar didn't have a settled team like Dhoni or Ganguly had. That was the reason why he wasn't very successful. Also, as Ganguly mentioned, he had some tough tours as captain. In my opinion, Dravid was the best captain India ever had, since I have started watching cricket. Kapildev was the first captain I have seen and he was brilliant. Shastri would have been the best ever. But, never got the chance. I hope India brings Gambhir back and make him the test captain. Kohli can learn captaincy in ODI's in the meantime.

  • anoopshameed on March 1, 2014, 11:59 GMT

    With no disrespect towards anyone who ordered the book or plans to do so, I think, even those who can't find the time to read the newspaper once in a month, will queue up for the book! This is the Tendulkar Effect! :D

  • xylo on March 1, 2014, 10:56 GMT

    Why is Ganguly so bitter about life now? Ganguly should have added that the stellar batsman that Tendulkar is, he was part of a team that lost 8-0 playing for his personal glory. While people complain about the team's recent records overseas, it is more because they are accustomed to the team's successes irrespective of the format and the location, which is something that Dhoni spoilt his fans with. If we went back to those days when Tendulkar, Dravid, VVS and Ganguly started out, the "famed" batting line up would collapse twice in two days. The plain simple fact is Tendulkar sucked at being a captain, and he was better off being a batsman.

  • jasonpete on March 1, 2014, 10:08 GMT

    Posted by subbuamdavadi on (March 1, 2014, 9:01 GMT) Ganguly and scandals are always match up each other and it's not right to compare with sachin and Dravid who played the game without single scandal in their whole career.Gambhir is not in the team due to his non performance and same goes for sehwag too. No one in the right mind will forget the Dalmia ganguly and chapel tenure.And everyone knows how ganguly removed laxman from 2003 World Cup team for no reason.He sounds bitter and talks mostly about dhoni in his conversation lately and no reason to guess why he is doing so.

  • subbuamdavadi on March 1, 2014, 9:01 GMT

    Continuing my previous point....You sow what you reap. Dhoni today is paying for his policy of backing non-performers....and do not forget, the initial days of Dhoni's tenure (2007 onwards) he had the full backing of Sachin, Rahul, Kumble, Viru etc. Instead of soliciting support of seniors such as Gambhir, he had them removed from the team and now has blocked their re-entry! When Ganguly wanted to make the ODI team more flexible he made RD keep wickets. People talk of RD's 'sacrifice' - but why not appreciate the wisdom of SG? Yes, Dhoni is a terrific finisher, but in terms of leadership qualities, he is sadly lacking. He has indeed delivered results - but mainly at home. Worse, he has managed to lose ODI series at home to Pakistan, and Test series at home to England....and other than the first T20 WC, India hasn't exactly set that stage alight too! My final point - SG (or RD or SRT or even Sehwag) never had even the whiff of a scandal touching them - just contrast that with MSD!!

  • subbuamdavadi on March 1, 2014, 8:48 GMT

    There are many comments here which talk about how Saurav is not the best ever Indian captain, or the fact that Saurav had Zaheer, Bhajji, Yuvraj, Sachin, Rahul, Kumble around to help him win matches abroad....Let us critically analyse these arguments. 1. When Saurav inherited the team, there was a lot of deadwood around. As a young captain (that too from a non-performing state like Bengal!) he gave opportunities to Zaheer, Viru, Bhajji, Kaif, Yuvi etc. He built the team around Sachin, Rahul and himself with the help of these youngsters. Chances were given on merit and not on friendships. That is how great teams are built. There were many times when Bengal players were chosen on the basis of Ranji performances - remember Deep Dasgupta, Ranadeb Bose? - but when found lacking, he did not hesitate replacing them with better options. Contrast this with Dhoni and his support of RP Singh, Raina, Rohit...his continued ignoring of Ojha, Mishra, Pujara, Rahane (till now)..

  • on March 1, 2014, 8:23 GMT

    I like sachin very much I also played for nirlon b team my coach was ramakanth achrekar

  • on March 1, 2014, 7:23 GMT

    Ganguly is the best ever Captain and a Great Batsman India ever had!!! There won't be a better one like him in the present and the future!!

  • Philippe on March 1, 2014, 5:05 GMT

    I don't knw but sachin was overall burdened by being captain & also wen he was not even captain... there used to be a time wen he scored & India wins/save test matches.... He was like 1 man army for almost a decade for Indian team... The same thing has happened to start again with Virat kohli... I don't know if he will be burdened by making captain bt surely he will soon enter the same phase of India cricket.... He scores & India wins & vice versa

  • on March 1, 2014, 4:33 GMT

    Sourav Ganguly consider himself as the best captian india had ever seen. I think he should be rated after Dhoni, Azhar and Kapil. Ganguly always talks of captaincy as if he was a born captain. His logic is simple, he want to sack Dhoni as captain before he breaks Ganguly's records as captain. Dhoni might be selfish in selection by picking the payers he likes, but he is the best captian i have seen after Imran Khan who lead from the front that too at the time the team was down. Especially he is a top performer. Dont ignore his contribution is getting the world cup. To win tests in foreign soil, we need to produce good fast bowlers.

  • on March 1, 2014, 3:32 GMT

    Ganguly taking a jab at Dhoni about the 0-8 loss? Looks like he's bitter about something. That's too bad.

  • Sachit1979 on March 1, 2014, 3:14 GMT

    @Krishna Mithun, Dada talks a lot about intent. Under Sachin, Dada and Dravid era, team had real intent to fight at overseas and prove a point though those were not so experienced. Now it looks like we go overseas more for site seeing than playing Cricket. 4-0,4-0,2-0,1-0,4-0,1-0. Should these be the credentials of world cup winning team?

  • CricFan24 on March 1, 2014, 2:59 GMT

    Just ordered the book. Sachin's legend will only grow - as the unparalleled monument that is his career is appreciated more and more as time goes by.

  • on March 1, 2014, 2:20 GMT

    Same ia the case for Ms Dhoni Mr. Ganguly. You benefited a lot from Zaheer khan, Harbhajan singh, tendulkar, laxman and dravid. Just because these guys were winning it for you, nobody queationed your credibility. Ms dhoni doea not have a bowler who can provide the break through. You are extremely biased with your opinions and i have seen that.Well MSD will bounce back Ganguly, wait and watch.

  • on February 28, 2014, 22:15 GMT

    Ganguly writes: "He led on some very tough tours - South Africa, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Australia - and it must be said he didn't lose eight in a row. This when he didn't have a very good team around him. The older players were fading and the newcomers were too raw."

  • on February 28, 2014, 20:56 GMT

    When will the Kindle edition be available? It is unfair to give us a taste of what's in the book and not have it in stock or available on Kindle :).

  • on February 28, 2014, 19:09 GMT

    Just ordered the book. Yaeyy. :D

  • on February 28, 2014, 18:48 GMT

    Mr. Ganguly "He led on some very tough tours - South Africa, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Australia - and it must be said he didn't lose eight in a row. This when he didn't have a very good team around him. The older players were fading and the newcomers were too raw."

    Isnt this statement applicable for the 8-0 loss too ?? Yes Seniors wre fading and Young bloods are raw !! Expecting a few unbiased comments from a man with a reputation like Ganguly !!

  • Ha8rick on February 28, 2014, 18:31 GMT

    Ganguly writes: "He led on some very tough tours - South Africa, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Australia - and it must be said he didn't lose eight in a row. This when he didn't have a very good team around him. The older players were fading and the newcomers were too raw."

    That's a sweetly timed Cover Drive aimed at Dhoni's captaincy.

  • on February 28, 2014, 18:02 GMT

    this will be worth a read..

  • on February 28, 2014, 17:41 GMT

    sachin,ganguly,dravid those 3 looks like 3 man army nd its tough to replace because we cant another master sachin nd another wall rahul nd sourav good batsman n gr8 indian captain forever because of dirty politics every one dont know the value of sourav

  • zxaar on February 28, 2014, 16:13 GMT

    "That he was a model professional is not in doubt. But the same can be said of any number of other cricketers." ----------- like for example??? You are talking as if cricketers like tendulkar come every 5 years.

  • A.Ak on February 28, 2014, 16:10 GMT

    No wonder these players are great. They respect the game and each other. Lets hope the current and future generation learn from them.

  • on February 28, 2014, 13:55 GMT

    Yet another cloying tribute Without a scintilla of criticism. Makes me wonder how useful this exercise can be. That he was a model professional is not in doubt. But the same can be said of any number of other cricketers. I wonder if anyone will write tributes to Shiv Chanderpaul when he is done. If not it's hard to not construe this as anything but a cynical commercial enterprise.

  • vmkrish2002 on February 28, 2014, 12:15 GMT

    Just waiting to buy the book and go through this one. Interesting MSD doesnt feature in such books with his comments on the great man. Also would like to see what Mr. Chappell has written on SRT. Hats off to Sambit Bal to bring this out and best line said " THE MAN CRICKET LOVED BACK" So true. Also the interview with Lara would be something to go down the memory lane. Thank you Cricinfo!!!

  • on February 28, 2014, 11:55 GMT

    The piece augurs the book to be an interesting read.Revisiting those aspects of the game which have remained hitherto unexplored but interestingly enjoyable, for carrying an indelible imprint of the maestro is always soothing to the senses and nostalgic.Congrats Cricinfo for the book.

  • on February 28, 2014, 11:55 GMT

    The piece augurs the book to be an interesting read.Revisiting those aspects of the game which have remained hitherto unexplored but interestingly enjoyable, for carrying an indelible imprint of the maestro is always soothing to the senses and nostalgic.Congrats Cricinfo for the book.

  • vmkrish2002 on February 28, 2014, 12:15 GMT

    Just waiting to buy the book and go through this one. Interesting MSD doesnt feature in such books with his comments on the great man. Also would like to see what Mr. Chappell has written on SRT. Hats off to Sambit Bal to bring this out and best line said " THE MAN CRICKET LOVED BACK" So true. Also the interview with Lara would be something to go down the memory lane. Thank you Cricinfo!!!

  • on February 28, 2014, 13:55 GMT

    Yet another cloying tribute Without a scintilla of criticism. Makes me wonder how useful this exercise can be. That he was a model professional is not in doubt. But the same can be said of any number of other cricketers. I wonder if anyone will write tributes to Shiv Chanderpaul when he is done. If not it's hard to not construe this as anything but a cynical commercial enterprise.

  • A.Ak on February 28, 2014, 16:10 GMT

    No wonder these players are great. They respect the game and each other. Lets hope the current and future generation learn from them.

  • zxaar on February 28, 2014, 16:13 GMT

    "That he was a model professional is not in doubt. But the same can be said of any number of other cricketers." ----------- like for example??? You are talking as if cricketers like tendulkar come every 5 years.

  • on February 28, 2014, 17:41 GMT

    sachin,ganguly,dravid those 3 looks like 3 man army nd its tough to replace because we cant another master sachin nd another wall rahul nd sourav good batsman n gr8 indian captain forever because of dirty politics every one dont know the value of sourav

  • on February 28, 2014, 18:02 GMT

    this will be worth a read..

  • Ha8rick on February 28, 2014, 18:31 GMT

    Ganguly writes: "He led on some very tough tours - South Africa, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Australia - and it must be said he didn't lose eight in a row. This when he didn't have a very good team around him. The older players were fading and the newcomers were too raw."

    That's a sweetly timed Cover Drive aimed at Dhoni's captaincy.

  • on February 28, 2014, 18:48 GMT

    Mr. Ganguly "He led on some very tough tours - South Africa, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Australia - and it must be said he didn't lose eight in a row. This when he didn't have a very good team around him. The older players were fading and the newcomers were too raw."

    Isnt this statement applicable for the 8-0 loss too ?? Yes Seniors wre fading and Young bloods are raw !! Expecting a few unbiased comments from a man with a reputation like Ganguly !!

  • on February 28, 2014, 19:09 GMT

    Just ordered the book. Yaeyy. :D