The Investec Ashes 2013 July 4, 2013

Pattinson wants Ashes vengeance

It's been five years but James Pattinson finds it hard to forget the treatment meted out to his brother in the aftermath of one of the more bizarre selections of recent times
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James Pattinson needs no extra incentive to strive to win an Ashes series for Australia. But he has one anyway: when the fatigue builds in, and the scoreboard takes on a daunting look, he will vow to avenge the treatment of his brother in one of the great England selectorial botches of all time.

It was not just that England's selection of Darren Pattinson for the Headingley Test against South Africa in 2008 was bizarre, it was the reaction that followed that made it one of the more unsavoury affairs of recent English vintage.

England's captain, Michael Vaughan, was privately resentful that an Australian with a dual passport, and an Australian, more to the point, who he had seen only bowl a couple of balls, a former roof tiler who had not made his first-class debut until he was 26, was thrust upon him on the back of 29 wickets at 20 runs apiece for Nottinghamshire. He wanted Steve Harmison and suggested in his autobiography that he accepted Pattinson only because he assumed he would not play.

As South Africa made 522, and an outcry followed in the media, there was no doubt who was cast in the role of scapegoat. Pattinson was used then abused. His return of 2 for 95 bore comparison with the rest but he would have been better sticking to his original intention and taking the kids to Alton Towers. His England Test career, a career of convenience on all sides, disappeared in a trice.

James is now in England with Australia, 40 wickets in ten Tests to his name, at an imposing average of 23, his pedigree beyond debate, his selection for the first Investec Test at Trent Bridge assured. His career has seen irresistible bursts of brilliance mixed with frustrating absences because of injury. But as England prepare to face him for the first time, they will be wary of his natural talent: his vigorous run, heaps of aggression, and ability to bowl outswing around 145kph.

While he plays his cricket aggressively, he is engaging off the field, a world away from the programmed responses so common among the current crop of international cricketers. He relates the family story with refreshing honesty. It is a story that the Pattinson family has never quite laid to rest. This is the series where they yearn to put their grievances to rights.

"Darren didn't know about his selection until eight o'clock the night before," James said. "He drove to Leeds, didn't meet anyone until breakfast, and the next thing you know, he was in. I dreamt of playing for Australia at a young age but I don't think he dreamt of playing for England at a young age. It was different.

"Darren was thrown in at the deep end and was getting all the media thrown at him, saying it was a disgrace. It wasn't his fault he was picked. He was there, he was performing, he was an in-form cricketer at the time and he had an English passport, which always helps."

"It wasn't Darren's fault that he played and was made the scapegoat. It would have been a different story if England had won, of course"

Back home in Dandenong, a suburb southeast of Melbourne en route to the Dandenong Ranges, the Pattinson family seethed. They were proud of their English background: James' mum, Sue, was from Wombwell in Yorkshire, Dickie Bird country ("I think he's the only umpire she knows," laughed James), his dad, John, hailed from Grimsby, the Lincolnshire fishing port, where famously the Sri Lankans once got food poisoning munching fish and chips.

During that week, the Pattinson pride took a battering. "It was quite a big thing, not only for him but for me, and I know it shook dad up a bit," James said. "My dad is quite a hard-nosed type of bloke. He read something from Graham Gooch and felt like ringing him up and giving him his two bob's worth. I owe a lot of credit to my dad for the way we've been brought up. He's an aggressive type of bloke and I've got a lot of that attitude as well."

Gooch, now England's batting coach, described the older Pattinson's selection as "one of the most left-field decisions I've ever seen", and declared "the international game is in danger of being devalued if we have any more selections like this". He went on: "Pattinson's father says he's a proud Aussie, and his brother plays for their Under-19 side. Can you switch from being a proud Aussie to a passionate Englishman overnight?"

"At that stage Dad still supported English cricket a lot," James said. "He's always been that hard-nosed guy that stuck by where he's come from. After that he didn't like the way that Darren was treated over here. It wasn't Darren's fault that he played and was made the scapegoat. It would have been a different story if England had won, of course. Ever since then he has always supported me playing for Australia.

"Growing up I always had a soft spot for England in soccer. But definitely they're my No. 1 enemy now. I think it's all about picking your times and there's no better time than an Ashes series to show that aggression. In the good teams, ten years ago, they backed themselves and played naturally. The true Australian way comes out. At 23, it's a good age to take on the world."

In the sort of entanglement that gives the Ashes series a special piquancy, England even made a token attempt to entice James into shifting allegiance. It was driven ahead by David Saker, England's Australian bowling coach and James' first coach at Victoria.

"I have got a dual passport, too," James said. "When David Saker moved over to be the coach over here I hadn't played for Australia. I was picked in two T20s to play just after the Ashes but I was 12th man in both of them.

"I was in the dressing room at the MCG when I got a call from Sakes. I don't know if he was being serious. It was 'Come over and play, Darren's playing over here for Nottinghamshire.' I just thought he was mucking around so I laughed it off.

"It was quite funny. I have a good relationship with Sakes. He was my first bowling coach when he was at Victoria. He has the same mentality that Darren Lehmann brings to us as well. He is a great man with great knowledge. They teach you how to play cricket as well; they make you learn the game."

Darren Pattinson never had that luxury. His emergence came late. "He always had that ability, but never really went forward at a young age," James said. "That's one thing he taught me: that when you get your chances, to make the most of it - that's one thing he probably regretted a little bit."

Darren is now training greyhounds and has started his own kennels a 45-minute drive out of Melbourne. "It's always been a passion of his," James said. "He has gone from roof tiling to playing for England to now training greyhounds."

There is no doubt, though, who in the Pattinson family now yearns to prove himself top dog.

David Hopps is the UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Favell on July 4, 2013, 23:45 GMT

    I always admired the way Darren Pattinson played the game. He was a no fuss kind of bowler, in the Paul Reiffel, Geoff Dymock and Damien Fleming mold, who bowls good pace without the histrionics. In his one test match for England he was anything but disgraced, given the treatment meted out to him, and his 2-95 could have looked so much better with a little luck going his way to turn it into a 3 or 4-for. I really don't get the hyper-aggression of our young fast bowlers. Nothing looks sillier than a quick mouthing off to a batsman and then being smacked for four on the next ball. To me a wry grin or a silent glare has more impact on a batsman and aggression leads to those ugly send-offs which are a blight on the game.

  • InnocentGuy on July 7, 2013, 16:12 GMT

    I am all for the Aussies battering the English this time around. But all this talk of vengeance is actually very silly. I like the way James bowls and shows his aggression on the field, but I feel he needs to mature. Just let the ball do the talking mate.

  • PACERONE on July 6, 2013, 16:56 GMT

    I would advise him to watch Curtly Ambrose bowling to Dean Jones after Jones upset him.This kid could cause England all kinds of trouble.Keep off the leg stump unless it is at their ribs and not too much width.Can't wait to watch it.The toss will be important.England only bowl well in good bowling conditions.Australia will destroy them if they get good bowling conditions.

  • camcove on July 6, 2013, 10:43 GMT

    Wibblewibble - Believe it or not, mate, but I know they won't all play in the one side. The point I was making is that they have depth in the squad (and there are going to be 10 tests in the two series). We can make whatever predictions we want (as in who will or won't average 50). Both the composition of the respective attacks and their effectiveness will largely depend upon bowling conditions. If conditions suit seam bowlers, the Aussie attack will be effective. You may recall that there were thoughts from a lot of Brits that England would outgun SA. They didn't. Don't be shocked if the Aussie seamers do the odd demolition job and as a pack outperform England.

  • Leggie on July 6, 2013, 7:40 GMT

    James Pattinson is a great find for Australia, and one of the best talents in world cricket. I would love to see him talk less, and mellow down on the bodily aggression that he exhibits.

  • on July 6, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    I like James Pattinson and his bowling.I've not known him to really speak out against anything before this.If it's his incentive to do well..it is..He'll do better to back up is words & get wickets! I all this..I don't see him really going after any English batsman from current series whom he's up against..just English media & selection policies!! So I don't see this as him mouthing off against someone!

  • Vikramaditya100 on July 6, 2013, 6:04 GMT

    I hope all this pre-series talk leads to a great series. Hope it doesn't turn out to be a damp squib. Would like to see some great fast bowling.

  • Mitcher on July 6, 2013, 3:30 GMT

    Oh what a surprise, the usual press conference police wag their fingers, exclaiming that 'Talk is cheap'... As they talk talk talk... Sweet, scrumptious, delicious irony!!!

  • johnal on July 5, 2013, 23:25 GMT

    maybe a personal thing . it is for him to do his talking on the field with the ball not in the media

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on July 5, 2013, 20:53 GMT

    Does Pattison 'want vengeance' for the last Ashes, or the one before? Seeing that England beat Australia just for fun these days, in test matches and odi's, Pattison is going to be up to his ears in scary vengeance come the next Ashes down under, that's after Australia lose this Ashes of course.

  • Favell on July 4, 2013, 23:45 GMT

    I always admired the way Darren Pattinson played the game. He was a no fuss kind of bowler, in the Paul Reiffel, Geoff Dymock and Damien Fleming mold, who bowls good pace without the histrionics. In his one test match for England he was anything but disgraced, given the treatment meted out to him, and his 2-95 could have looked so much better with a little luck going his way to turn it into a 3 or 4-for. I really don't get the hyper-aggression of our young fast bowlers. Nothing looks sillier than a quick mouthing off to a batsman and then being smacked for four on the next ball. To me a wry grin or a silent glare has more impact on a batsman and aggression leads to those ugly send-offs which are a blight on the game.

  • InnocentGuy on July 7, 2013, 16:12 GMT

    I am all for the Aussies battering the English this time around. But all this talk of vengeance is actually very silly. I like the way James bowls and shows his aggression on the field, but I feel he needs to mature. Just let the ball do the talking mate.

  • PACERONE on July 6, 2013, 16:56 GMT

    I would advise him to watch Curtly Ambrose bowling to Dean Jones after Jones upset him.This kid could cause England all kinds of trouble.Keep off the leg stump unless it is at their ribs and not too much width.Can't wait to watch it.The toss will be important.England only bowl well in good bowling conditions.Australia will destroy them if they get good bowling conditions.

  • camcove on July 6, 2013, 10:43 GMT

    Wibblewibble - Believe it or not, mate, but I know they won't all play in the one side. The point I was making is that they have depth in the squad (and there are going to be 10 tests in the two series). We can make whatever predictions we want (as in who will or won't average 50). Both the composition of the respective attacks and their effectiveness will largely depend upon bowling conditions. If conditions suit seam bowlers, the Aussie attack will be effective. You may recall that there were thoughts from a lot of Brits that England would outgun SA. They didn't. Don't be shocked if the Aussie seamers do the odd demolition job and as a pack outperform England.

  • Leggie on July 6, 2013, 7:40 GMT

    James Pattinson is a great find for Australia, and one of the best talents in world cricket. I would love to see him talk less, and mellow down on the bodily aggression that he exhibits.

  • on July 6, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    I like James Pattinson and his bowling.I've not known him to really speak out against anything before this.If it's his incentive to do well..it is..He'll do better to back up is words & get wickets! I all this..I don't see him really going after any English batsman from current series whom he's up against..just English media & selection policies!! So I don't see this as him mouthing off against someone!

  • Vikramaditya100 on July 6, 2013, 6:04 GMT

    I hope all this pre-series talk leads to a great series. Hope it doesn't turn out to be a damp squib. Would like to see some great fast bowling.

  • Mitcher on July 6, 2013, 3:30 GMT

    Oh what a surprise, the usual press conference police wag their fingers, exclaiming that 'Talk is cheap'... As they talk talk talk... Sweet, scrumptious, delicious irony!!!

  • johnal on July 5, 2013, 23:25 GMT

    maybe a personal thing . it is for him to do his talking on the field with the ball not in the media

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on July 5, 2013, 20:53 GMT

    Does Pattison 'want vengeance' for the last Ashes, or the one before? Seeing that England beat Australia just for fun these days, in test matches and odi's, Pattison is going to be up to his ears in scary vengeance come the next Ashes down under, that's after Australia lose this Ashes of course.

  • Harmony111 on July 5, 2013, 18:51 GMT

    Australia do have some bowling talent which at its best can match England bowlers if they are less than their best. That is a lot of If but it does happen in Cricket (or in any sport). Just a few days back, SL, of all teams managed to beat India in an ODI after eons and it was a day where SL were at their best while India were keen to show how to negatively perform. Both Starc & Pattinson have the ability of picking wickets and exploiting conditions. The bigger IF is about their fitness. They managed to last for 4 tests in India and that bodes well. I don't know if Tremlett is in the Ashes team and if he isn't then English attack is mainly Anderson & Swann. Bresnan is more or less spent and Broad is not exactly in peak form. At his best Broad is pretty sharp and sometimes matches Anderson but will Broad manage it this time?

    Aus's main problem is their batting. Talent is there but Eng have it too + their men are in great form.

  • wibblewibble on July 5, 2013, 16:28 GMT

    camcove: You can only pick 3 quicks mate. I'm sure if Siddle, Pattinson, Starc, Faulkner, Bird and Harris all played the aussie attack would be ok. I'll reckon Cook, Root, Trott, KP and Prior will all bat above 50 for the series. Bell looks like a walking wicket, but we carried Colly in 2011 too.

  • YorkshirePudding on July 5, 2013, 14:36 GMT

    @Posted by on (July 5, 2013, 13:20 GMT), it seems this is an attempt to fire up the aussies, just like the one with Starc stating they would be attacking Cook with left armers due to his weakness, and how a left arm slow blwoer was going to do for KP in th 2010/11 series.

    What matters is what happens on the pitch, and the England camp (not to be confused with the media) are being very tight lipped and letting the aussies get on with it.

  • on July 5, 2013, 13:20 GMT

    I don't get it. What is this vengeance and who is it directed at? The press was rough on his brother, but no-ones playing the press. England picked the man, an odd choice to say the least, and then did not pick him again. So why vengeance?

  • hhillbumper on July 5, 2013, 12:53 GMT

    Hoggy was very badly treated.Somehow he never got the respect that he deserved. He was a good honest swing bowler and did not get treatedt with the proper respect by England

  • mclass on July 5, 2013, 12:36 GMT

    Whats this guy really guilty of being Australian or being the form bowler in county cricket at the time? Of course England had real problems with bowling attack at the time and why not call up the form bowler? It just so happens the South Africans were in a destructive mood. All to often test cricket has become a old boys club regardless if you are in form or not.

  • 2.14istherunrate on July 5, 2013, 12:07 GMT

    This is likely to be a comic interlude as Pattinson was no Test bowler and a ridiculous selection who could only ever have played once. To think he was preferred over legendary swing bowler Matthew Hoggard seems absurd.I do not think I am alone in regarding Hoggard with near reverence. He WAS badly treated.

  • Fluffykins on July 5, 2013, 11:56 GMT

    I am not interested in talk rather action and I suspect England are too

  • SirViv1973 on July 5, 2013, 11:46 GMT

    I think Pattinson is showing his inexperience and has been ill advised to make comments like this on the eve of the ashes. If the Eng party bother to read these comments it will only increase their motivation to do well against him.

  • hhillbumper on July 5, 2013, 11:00 GMT

    Gosh.Now this team believe their own hype.Give credit to them though.They haven't won against us in years but still they taslk about themselves as the greatest team ever.

    As for picking Darren Pattinson God knows what happened there.It says something though when even England won't pick an Aussie either.

  • camcove on July 5, 2013, 10:53 GMT

    OhhhhMattyMatty - I assume you are having a bit of sport, mate - hope so for your sake. There seems to be an air of confidence in the English media and fans that England will win easily. (I'm not referring specifically to Botham and his inane comments about winning 12-nil). I wouldn't underestimate the potential of the Australian attack in this series - Starc is, as has been pointed out, a work in progress, but when he gets it right he is lethal; Pattinson is the real deal; Bird provides a bit of the McGrath trajectory, line and length; Siddle is incredibly underrated by everyone, it seems, except for opposition batsmen; Harris will be a handful if fit; and even Watson and Faulkner may prove to be an effective back-up. Lyon is a work in progress, but he can be a very effective offie. Aussie batting is the concern, not the bowling. I suspect that England will win in England and that Australia will win in Australia. Both should be closer than England v SA last year.

  • whatawicket on July 5, 2013, 10:23 GMT

    even the uk would not have fast tracked legislation so a guy who maybe be on par with the saffa leg spin bowler. when england were poor in the 90s and early 20s we should have got our government to pass laws allowing players who just arrived in the country to play international cricket. ours had to have lived 4 years now 7 years before selection

  • OhhhhhMattyMatty on July 5, 2013, 10:10 GMT

    James Pattinson would have been a useful county performer if he'd come over to England. Pushing the likes of Keith Barker and Chris Wright for places etc. Obviously he'd never have got in the England side, as he isn't as good as Tremlett, Anderson, Broad, Bresnan, Onions, Finn, Overton and Rankin. Probably would have averaged mid-30s over here playing proper County Cricket.

  • YorkshirePudding on July 5, 2013, 9:53 GMT

    @CutHis_ArminHalf, actually most england fans couldnt understand the selection either and it was one of the more left field selections england has ever pulled.

    As for the side swipe about SA players, all of them lived and played FC cricket in the UK for more than 4 years. Its not like we fasttrack the passports of players like they now do in Aus.

  • emmersonne on July 5, 2013, 9:33 GMT

    The Pattinson issue was bizarre. Hoggard had been dropped unexpectedly a few Tests prior, and when a like-for-like swing bowler went down injured, for a Test at Hoggard's home ground, no less, he was passed over for selection in favour of Pattinson. It's hard to know who I feel most sorry for.

  • cleanprophet on July 5, 2013, 8:53 GMT

    Pat Cummins is probably the most impressive Australian bowler but, of course, he can't stay fit. Starc is useful, but young, inexperiened and inconsistent. If he gets it right, he will be handful. I don't see there being any swing from his bowling and I don't see him being any better than Trent Boult (who was decent and no more). Harris can't last more than a couple of Tests. Pattinson is decent and Siddle is probably the most likely to get it right out of all of them.

    You can never, ever forget that most of these bowlers have never played in an Ashes and never in an Ashes in England. That will have an impact. That is a certainty.

    Joe Root is not a problem. He has been picked because he is strong enough for high level cricket. He could be 18yo and he would still be in there. Pietersen's first knock after injury was a sublime 170*. No concerns at all about his fitness. Swann had been bowling with a dodgy elbow for well over a year. That is now fixed and he is fully recovered.

  • CutHis_ArminHalf on July 5, 2013, 8:53 GMT

    Classic quote from Gooch.

    I guess being passionate for SA and playing for SA under 19's is different?

  • on July 5, 2013, 8:39 GMT

    @RandyOZ- a laughable comment given that the Australian government rushed through legislation so Australia could poach a half decent spinner from Pakistan. Pot, kettle, black.

  • YorkshirePudding on July 5, 2013, 7:59 GMT

    Its very curious that the Australian camp are making big noises, first Starc saying hes got Cooks number, now Pattinson inventing some fictious slight on his brother, who frankly should never have been on the radar at the time.

    All the while the England camp are staying tight lipped.

    If the australians had form and were like the team of the 1990's and early 2000's I could inderstand it, but they arnt they're not even a shadow on that team. Its almost as if they are trying to get themselves believing they can win.

    Time will tell and it might be close but I expect England will win the series 2-1 or 3-1 depending on weather.

  • UndertheGrill on July 5, 2013, 7:56 GMT

    If the Aussie bowlers kept themselves fit as well as they talk, they might have a half decent side.

  • hycIass on July 5, 2013, 7:40 GMT

    @SunilBatra some excellent comments mate.

  • Amith_S on July 5, 2013, 6:29 GMT

    Our bowlign doesn't worry me, we have a great fast bowling attack which Pattinson will lead. Clarke is showinhow it should be done and we can win this series. But I am not as convinced about this English test side, Bell is not exceptional, Pietersen is coming back from major injury, Bairstow is untested and Root is very very young. Cook and Trott need to do well for England to do well. Broad has struggled this year and Swann is also coming back from major surgery. It's a good time to be playing the English side, they may not have these issues in 12 months. Rogers makes sense because Australia has a good chance of drawing or winning this series. Khawaja for me is our best young talent and he has shown in shield cricket that he can handle the moving ball and face on tough decks. I would suggest that the selectors and coach feel the same way and which is why i pick Rogers and Khawaja to be the main supporting cast to captain Clarke. And don't count out Watson, boof is doing wonders.

  • HawK89 on July 5, 2013, 6:25 GMT

    @Favell Look at NZ a few years ago. They had bowlers that were tamed and only a dumb grin to show for it as batsmen dictated terms. Now with with a different mind set and aggression towards the boring English batting lineup, They made England work for their victory. I've seen Sangakara, Gilchrist, Lee and McGrath having something to say, testing their discipline and never anything personal. Sometimes you may get a wicket off a false shot or nothing at all.

    Unlike Butler, Wade, Johnson, Gambhir, Harbhajan, Dernbach, Starc, Pattison and Watson, they all have a mouthful to say and it looks ugly on the field. It even holds up play and umpires have to step in.

  • jonesy2 on July 5, 2013, 6:24 GMT

    I don't envy that joe root bloke most of all. I reckon joe root might be late exclusion on the morning of the first test.

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on July 5, 2013, 6:24 GMT

    @gsingh7: If India have learned how to play the swinging ball then my name's Michael Caine. Have you been watching cricket these last 5 years? I'd start with the whitewash England handed to India last time they met in England. It doesn't make for pretty reading, perhaps it's time to re-form some of those opinions?

  • Sunil_Batra on July 5, 2013, 6:19 GMT

    For me Patt, Starc, Siddle are best. Clarke is critical if we are going to win this ashes. With two Ashes series in 6 months, building to the future can be put on the backburner. I don't see the point of sacrificing the Ashes to blood youngsters who aren't ready yet but i can tell you that Khawaja and Hughes are ready. If we were heading into a series against some of the weaker test nations then it would make sense but the Ashes is the most important series to Australian cricket and we've got tow of them in such a short space of time. While our chances of winning either Ashes series are slim but we should give it a crack. We can rebuild after the Sydney test if need be.Obviously Rogers wont be a long-term selection but his form easily puts him in our best top 6 batsmen at the moment which is all anyone really has to do. Cowan hasn't done enough and failed again yesterday after getting dropped on 0. Surely its time to go for Watson, Rogers, Khawaja, Clarke, Hughes, Smith as our top 6.

  • Partyman on July 5, 2013, 6:09 GMT

    It is interesting to note that most of the Aussies are in the media vowing to knock off England - this is the second interview by Pattinson in almost a week, Bird talked to the media a week ago, then it was Siddle followed by Starc and now Pattinson again. I remember Watson and Warner talking a good talk last year before the one day series and we all know what happened then. Even more interesting is that England have kept very quiet. We will wait and see how good these Australians really are - they are certainly good at talking.

  • Rowayton on July 5, 2013, 5:26 GMT

    Sorry jmcilhinney, but tall poppy syndrome is not rife in Australia, although lots of people say it is. Australians are quite comfortable with people who are good at things; however they are much less comfortable with people who think they are good at things. Tall poppy syndrome is a myth perpetuated by people who think they should be above criticism, when there is no reason for them to be. David Warner springs to mind.

  • David_Bofinger on July 5, 2013, 5:26 GMT

    Taking into account that his two wickets were Amla and Prince, his performance seems kind of adequate but not brilliant. Certainly nothing that deserves pillory. But the English press has always been harsh on players and teams.

    jmcilhinney, tall poppy syndrome is very Australian but someone like Pattinson wouldn't normally be its target. You have to stick your head up above the rest, and fail to look sufficiently modest, before you get it cut off.

  • RednWhiteArmy on July 5, 2013, 5:25 GMT

    Pattinson said in an interview that his dad supported England until he started playing for Australia. He also said he & his family "used" to follow England in football.

    Sounds like he fancy's the 3rd England seamers position. Sorry though James, your too fragile.

  • mateyman on July 5, 2013, 4:47 GMT

    Haha @Gsingh7... Pattinson got thrashed did he? Funny how he ended up averaging 27 in that series...

  • RobTay14 on July 5, 2013, 4:25 GMT

    That's a pretty rough deal what happened to Pattinson, he bowled better then at least one other bowler in that match: Broad. Yes Broad got some runs, but still, he is a bowler first and foremost. The media could have dumped on him instead. Sort of makes me want to see the young Pattinson do well.

  • Ozcricketwriter on July 5, 2013, 4:05 GMT

    Reading this kind of thing just makes me mad. If James Pattinson has anything like that kind of reaction, then expect him to be man of the series. There's nothing quite like a quality fast bowler getting fired up.

  • jmcilhinney on July 5, 2013, 1:55 GMT

    There's no doubt that the whole affair around Darren Pattinson was a debacle. He never really should have been picked in the first place. He copped a lot of flack for a decision that was not his in the first place but let's not pretend that that has never happened before or since. Take Jade Dernbach for example. When he plays for England he does the best he can at the time and yet he is constantly pilloried. If he's not good enough to be in the team then it's the selectors fault for putting him there but they get much less criticism than Dernbach himself. The same goes for Australian players who have performed poorly over periods of time like Brad Haddin and Phil Hughes when they were last dropped from the side. Let's not pretend that Australia has some proud record of treating everyone well while England don't. Tall poppy syndrome is rife in Australia so let's not talk up "the Australian way". If Australia do win the Ashes then it doesn't change what happened to Darren Pattinson.

  • gsingh7 on July 5, 2013, 1:37 GMT

    good luck pattinson. u have talents to defeat england on green tops of england. where as on placid rank turners of india pattinson was thrashed by indian batsmen,mainly vijay and pujara and dhoni on way to 4-0 win. but english conditions will be supporting fast bowling. india already shown adaption to english weather on their way to winning ct2013 last month. now aus must adapt and win ashes. good luck , pat.

  • disco_bob on July 5, 2013, 1:21 GMT

    First Starc openly announces that he intends to discomfort Cooke, and now Pattinson declares it's time to put the fire in his belly out with a bucketload of English tears. The young Turks have spoken.

  • dunger.bob on July 5, 2013, 0:43 GMT

    I've seen and read a few interviews with Patto now and I think he has his head screwed on properly. .. He get's a bit of the old "white line fever" but off the field he seems a decent bloke. .. Provided he stays fit and out of off-field trouble, he should have a long and productive career. ... One thing he will have to watch is his aggressive posturing on the field. I don't mind a bit of that, it all adds to the drama and theatre, but you have to know when to stop. I feel that occasionally Patto starts to push the line and I begin to cringe a bit when he does. .. He's good enough to let his bowling do most of the talking anyway. .. A raised eyebrow can be just as much a statement as a gob full of trash talk. .. other than that minor complaint though, I think Patto is definitely a good-un... All the best mate, give em heaps.

  • debatable on July 5, 2013, 0:19 GMT

    I thought it was a poor selection but on nationality grounds.

    On cricketing grounds it made perfect sense; he was having an excellent season. All this business about roof tiler, only turned pro at 26, etc, is beside the point - he was the in-form paceman in the championship.

    The media and Vaughan's treatment of him was a disgrace. Poor guy.

  • RandyOZ on July 5, 2013, 0:02 GMT

    Another case of England simply trying to poach another overseeas talent because the cupboard at home is completely and utterly bare. It really is farcical to see the lengths that they will go to.

  • cleanprophet on July 4, 2013, 23:16 GMT

    Nothing Gooch said was unfair or unacceptable. Many people criticise England for selecting people not born and brought up in England and now, it seems, some are criticising Gooch for questioning the decision to select someone not born and brought up in England.

    In reality, it was a woeful selection and very left-field. Nobody ever criticised Darren Pattinson. He was never the scapegoat, so I have no idea where James has got that resentment from. Even now, several years later, the selection of Darren Pattinson was a very odd and very bad one. Regardless of his English heritage, he was and is an Australian and had no ambition to play for England.

    Nobody twisted his arm and made him play in that Test, so it is laughable to hear James Pattinson complain so heartily about it. I suppose if he wants to manipulate what happened for motivation, then good luck to him. But the reality is quite, quite different to the version he presents.

  • shillingsworth on July 4, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    Pattinson brought the problem on himself. What was to stop him informing the selectors, rather than members of the media, that he had never had any ambition to represent England?

  • pom_don on July 4, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    What a load of hyped up tripe........let's face it Darren could have said NO! they don't clap 'em in irons for not playing......not in England anyway!

  • Aashiq.kb on July 4, 2013, 21:57 GMT

    Hope he does well in the Ashes! It will be Jimmy vs Jimmy!!! James Pattinson & James Anderson! I got a feeling a that Australia will win the series 2-1.

  • chicko1983 on July 4, 2013, 21:51 GMT

    By the time these ten test matches are over, The Jimmy with be considered the worlds best fast bowler. No doubt about it.

  • chicko1983 on July 4, 2013, 21:51 GMT

    By the time these ten test matches are over, The Jimmy with be considered the worlds best fast bowler. No doubt about it.

  • Aashiq.kb on July 4, 2013, 21:57 GMT

    Hope he does well in the Ashes! It will be Jimmy vs Jimmy!!! James Pattinson & James Anderson! I got a feeling a that Australia will win the series 2-1.

  • pom_don on July 4, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    What a load of hyped up tripe........let's face it Darren could have said NO! they don't clap 'em in irons for not playing......not in England anyway!

  • shillingsworth on July 4, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    Pattinson brought the problem on himself. What was to stop him informing the selectors, rather than members of the media, that he had never had any ambition to represent England?

  • cleanprophet on July 4, 2013, 23:16 GMT

    Nothing Gooch said was unfair or unacceptable. Many people criticise England for selecting people not born and brought up in England and now, it seems, some are criticising Gooch for questioning the decision to select someone not born and brought up in England.

    In reality, it was a woeful selection and very left-field. Nobody ever criticised Darren Pattinson. He was never the scapegoat, so I have no idea where James has got that resentment from. Even now, several years later, the selection of Darren Pattinson was a very odd and very bad one. Regardless of his English heritage, he was and is an Australian and had no ambition to play for England.

    Nobody twisted his arm and made him play in that Test, so it is laughable to hear James Pattinson complain so heartily about it. I suppose if he wants to manipulate what happened for motivation, then good luck to him. But the reality is quite, quite different to the version he presents.

  • RandyOZ on July 5, 2013, 0:02 GMT

    Another case of England simply trying to poach another overseeas talent because the cupboard at home is completely and utterly bare. It really is farcical to see the lengths that they will go to.

  • debatable on July 5, 2013, 0:19 GMT

    I thought it was a poor selection but on nationality grounds.

    On cricketing grounds it made perfect sense; he was having an excellent season. All this business about roof tiler, only turned pro at 26, etc, is beside the point - he was the in-form paceman in the championship.

    The media and Vaughan's treatment of him was a disgrace. Poor guy.

  • dunger.bob on July 5, 2013, 0:43 GMT

    I've seen and read a few interviews with Patto now and I think he has his head screwed on properly. .. He get's a bit of the old "white line fever" but off the field he seems a decent bloke. .. Provided he stays fit and out of off-field trouble, he should have a long and productive career. ... One thing he will have to watch is his aggressive posturing on the field. I don't mind a bit of that, it all adds to the drama and theatre, but you have to know when to stop. I feel that occasionally Patto starts to push the line and I begin to cringe a bit when he does. .. He's good enough to let his bowling do most of the talking anyway. .. A raised eyebrow can be just as much a statement as a gob full of trash talk. .. other than that minor complaint though, I think Patto is definitely a good-un... All the best mate, give em heaps.

  • disco_bob on July 5, 2013, 1:21 GMT

    First Starc openly announces that he intends to discomfort Cooke, and now Pattinson declares it's time to put the fire in his belly out with a bucketload of English tears. The young Turks have spoken.

  • gsingh7 on July 5, 2013, 1:37 GMT

    good luck pattinson. u have talents to defeat england on green tops of england. where as on placid rank turners of india pattinson was thrashed by indian batsmen,mainly vijay and pujara and dhoni on way to 4-0 win. but english conditions will be supporting fast bowling. india already shown adaption to english weather on their way to winning ct2013 last month. now aus must adapt and win ashes. good luck , pat.