Cricinfo XV October 18, 2007

Rugger buggers

With the rugby World Cup final taking place in Paris this weekend, a look at XV players who were good enough to play both sports to a high standard
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With the rugby World Cup final taking place in Paris this weekend, we look at XV players who were good enough to play both sports to a high standard



Rob Andrew holds the pose while an undergraduate at Cambridge © Getty Images
Eric Tindill New Zealand
The ultimate double international ... seven men played cricket and rugby for New Zealand, but Tindill is the only one to have made Test appearances in both sports. Both his debuts came in England - at Twickenham in 1935-36 and at Lord's a year later. As if to underline his versatility, he also refereed a rugby international and umpired a Test. And at almost 97, he is the oldest living Test cricketer and the second-oldest of all time.

Rob Andrew England
Andrew made 71 appearances for England as a fly-half during their 1990s heyday, his most famous moment coming in the 1995 World Cup when his last-gasp drop goal gave England a quarter-final win over Australia. He was also a decent cricketer, good enough to score a hundred for Cambridge against Nottinghamshire. And in 1985, playing for Yorkshire's 2nd XI against Lancashire, his gentle offspin removed a 17-year-old Mike Atherton for a duck. He is currently England's director of rugby.

Andrew Stoddart England
One of only two men to have captained England at both sports - Monkey Hornby was the other - Stoddart didn't start playing cricket seriously until he was 22 and immediately made a mark with an innings of 485 in a day for Hampstead - he had been up all night beforehand playing poker and then raced away from the match to play a few sets of tennis. He could bat, he could bowl, and he was an excellent fielder, and what's more he was the leading centre of his era, playing ten internationals for England. But his life ended in tragedy. Unable to cope with declining physical powers and financial worries, he committed suicide.

Rudi van Vuuren Namibia
van Vuuren is unique in that he represented his country at the 2003 cricket World Cup in South Africa and at the rugby World Cup in Australia later that year. His five matches in cricket's version were mixed affairs - van Vuuren was hammered for a then-record 28 in one over by Darren Lehmann, but he gained some solace in taking 5 for 43 against England. A decent fly-half, he was injured for much of Namibia's rugby campaign, including their 142-0 defeat against the defending champions Australia, but he came on to make history as a late replacement against Romania.

Alistair Hignell England
Hignell won Blues at Cambridge for both rugby and cricket, winning 15 caps for England as a solid full-back. He made his England debut in 1975 in a brutal encounter with Australia at Brisbane - eight days later he was playing for Gloucestershire against Middlesex in Bristol. He continued to juggle cricket, rugby and teaching after university, and subsequently moved into journalism working for the BBC. His England career overlapped with another cricket-playing full-back - Dusty Hare.



Jeff Wilson evades an Italian tackler during the 1999 World Cup © Getty Images
Jeff Wilson New Zealand
A throwback to an early era where dual internationals were more commonplace. Wilson started as a cricketer, playing four ODIs as a 19-year-old allrounder of considerable promise, before turning his attention to rugby where he became an All Black legend with 44 tries in 60 appearances. On retiring he returned to playing cricket, and after a 12-year gap he returned to play two more ODIs and a one-off Twenty20 for New Zealand against Australia in February and March 2005.

Tuppy Owen-Smith South Africa/England
A man who would have been at home alongside Corinthians such as CB Fry. A good lightweight boxer, he scored 129 for South Africa against England at Headingley in 1929 - including a hundred before lunch on the third day - and he could bowl as well. In 1930 he returned to England as a Rhodes scholar at Oxford and shone at cricket and rugby there, so much so that he won ten caps for England as an attacking full-back.

Mike Smith England
An inspirational county and solid England captain, Mike Smith scored three hundreds in three varsity matches for Oxford - breaking a record held by the Nawab of Pataudi - and he captained both the cricket and rugby sides. In his final year he played once for England as outside centre against Wales, but he had a poor game and was not selected again. He wore glasses to play cricket but not, understandably, to play rugby.

Charlie Oliver New Zealand
Oliver first played for the All Blacks in 1928 - the side also included Curly Page, who captained New Zealand in seven Tests - and he would have won a second cap in 1931 but had to withdraw after he was bitten on the hand in a provincial match. In 1935-36 he was vice-captain of the side which toured England. With Tindill, a fellow tourist, he co-wrote The Tour of the Third All Blacks. In 1926-27 he played cricket for New Zealand against the Rest of New Zealand, but he took part in little cricket thereafter.

Martin Donnelly New Zealand/England
Donnelly was one of the first truly great New Zealand cricketers, a supremely talented left-hand batsman of whom it was said that "he had everything as a Test batsman: style and grace; confidence and determination; success and modesty". But for World War II and New Zealand's rare international outings, his career record would have been far more impressive. When at Oxford after the war it was said that people would flock to the Parks when word got round that Donnelly was batting. He also played once for England at fly-half, an unfortunate experience as Ireland hammered them at Lansdowne Road.



Alistair Hignell in action for England in 1978 © Getty Images
Brian McKechnie New Zealand
McKechnie was the unwilling participant in controversies in both sports. In 1981 he was the batsman on the receiving end of Trevor Chappell's infamous underarm delivery at the end of the third final of the Benson & Hedges World Series between New Zealand and Australia at the MCG. Three years earlier he kicked the penalty that gave the All Blacks a hotly disputed 13-12 win over Wales at Cardiff. The result secured New Zealand's rugby players a "grand slam" of victories against all four of the home nations, but the match would forever be remembered by the Welsh for Andy Hayden's infamous dive out of a line-out. Blurred memories claim that this was the incident that led to the penalty, though history records otherwise.

Clive van Ryneveld South Africa/England
Many considered van Ryneveld the finest South African sportsman of his generation, and had his career in law not increasingly impinged then he might have achieved even more. A double Blue at Oxford, he played all four Five Nations matches for England in 1948-49 while still at university, scoring three tries.

Maurice Turnbull England/Wales
One of Wales' great sportsmen, he represented them at cricket, hockey and rugby, was a regional squash champion and looked set to become an influential administrator. He started playing for Glamorgan as a schoolboy in 1924 and then led them with distinction throughout the 1930s. He was 33 when war broke out in 1939. Five years later he was shot through the head by a sniper in Normandy.

Reggie Schwarz South Africa/England
Schwarz was an ordinary cricketer until he learned the art of googly bowling from Bernard Bosanquet. He developed the art, passed on his knowledge, and for a few years South Africa's legspin trio of Schwarz, Bert Vogler and Aubrey Faulkner were match-winners, especially on matting wickets. Before emigrating to South Africa he had won three caps for England as a centre. He served throughout World War I only to die from Spanish Flu a week after the Armistice.

Otto Nothling Australia
Remarkably for a country that has produced so many multi-talented sportsmen, Nothling is the only man to have played both rugby and football for Australia. A solid batsman and useful seamer who squeezed sport around his medical career, his one Test came in 1928-29, the season he made his only first-class hundred. The man he kept out of the side was Don Bradman, who fulfilled 12th man duties for the only time in his life. Nothing made 0 and 44 but within a year he had given up. His one rugby Test was against the All Blacks in Sydney in 1924.

Martin Williamson is executive editor of Cricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY JamesJones on | October 22, 2007, 12:02 GMT

    Liam Botham- Son of Sir Beefy, Useful Hampshire cricketer who played rugby for England at U21 level going on to play for Cardiff and the Newcastle Falcons

  • POSTED BY JamesJones on | October 22, 2007, 11:54 GMT

    Nick Mallet, who played for the Springboks and later went on to coach the Springboks (and now Italy) was a useful cricketer who won a Cricket Blue for Oxford. Also Gerbrand Grobler who played both cricket and rugby for the old Northern Transvaal in the 1980/90's. More recently Roly Benade who played for Zimbabwe's U19 cricket team in the U19 Cricket World Cup a few years back, last month played in a rugby international for Zimbabwe's national rugby team, The Sables.

    Warren Carne (Zimbabwe)

  • POSTED BY MaxB on | October 21, 2007, 22:31 GMT

    It's not true that Otto Nothling was the only Australian dual international. Johnny Taylor played 20 cricket Tests between 1920 and 1926, and won two Rugby caps at fly half in 1922, playing against New Zealand Maori (scoring a try in each match). Another dual international who has been overlooked is Gregor MacGregor, a wicketkeeper in 8 Tests for England (1890-93) who played 13 Rugby internationals for Scotland between 1889 and 1896.

  • POSTED BY seanipops on | October 21, 2007, 21:09 GMT

    Simon Halliday who played centre and wing for both Bath and England in the late 80's/early 90's also has a FC hundred to his name.

  • POSTED BY Christoph on | October 21, 2007, 15:05 GMT

    Hershelle Gibbs was an astounding schoolboy talent. He played flyhalf for SA Schools. I saw him in the final of the Craven Week running the Hershelle Gibbs show. He scored what felt like 30 points against a monster Blue Bulls side. He was teasing the opposing flankers through holding the ball at them while running full pace. At one stage he received the ball behind his back in his own half. He did a full 360 degree turn and dropped the ball over, from his own half! He broke the line at will in scoring three individual tries. He never played against the All Blacks though, as he stopped playing rugby in 1993. Hansie Cronje played eight man for Free State schools and Darryll Cullinan played flyhalf for SA Universities.

  • POSTED BY choc56 on | October 21, 2007, 14:26 GMT

    From Sri Lanka, the one that springs to mind is Mahesa Rodrigo, who - get this - CAPTAINED BOTH national teams in cricket and rugby back in the forties. In his only appearance against Jeff Stollemeyer's West Indies side, he carried his bat out for 135 (he was also the keeper), prompting Stollemeyer to remark "that man Rodrigo - not only does he look like us, he bats better than the best of us!". Rodrigo was an exceptional scrum-half and also coached his club and school sides for many years after his retirement.

    Another outstanding sportsman was Jagath Fernando of Royal College, who captained the school at both sports and had a century before lunch (on way to a record 160) at the Annual Royal-St Thomas' College fixture, which is the second oldest unbroken cricket series in the world. He played for the Sri Lanka Schools team and played Premier Division cricket for a few years, but in rugby, as a phenomenal fly-half, he went on to captain the country (if I'm not mistaken).

  • POSTED BY jfgc on | October 20, 2007, 12:42 GMT

    Peter Cranmer.After St Edwards School Oxford played Rugby for England.Also Captain of Cricket for Warwickshire. Died a few years ago.

  • POSTED BY jimbrady on | October 20, 2007, 9:04 GMT

    I found the following via google as well:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Walker_(Australian_sportsman)

    Played Rugby tests for Australia and was in the Australian Cricket Tourists to South Africa in 1949/50 (but never played a Test).

  • POSTED BY jimbrady on | October 20, 2007, 8:33 GMT

    Ray Lindwall? (He played Rugby League though.) His partner Keith Miller was a top Australian Rules footballer as well. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Lindwall

  • POSTED BY gasman on | October 20, 2007, 5:42 GMT

    Tony Harris SA Rugby 5 tests vs N Z 1937 [2] vs Brit Isles [3] in 1938.SA Cricket 3 caps 1947 to 1949.Played 55 first class games scoring over 3000 runs

  • POSTED BY JamesJones on | October 22, 2007, 12:02 GMT

    Liam Botham- Son of Sir Beefy, Useful Hampshire cricketer who played rugby for England at U21 level going on to play for Cardiff and the Newcastle Falcons

  • POSTED BY JamesJones on | October 22, 2007, 11:54 GMT

    Nick Mallet, who played for the Springboks and later went on to coach the Springboks (and now Italy) was a useful cricketer who won a Cricket Blue for Oxford. Also Gerbrand Grobler who played both cricket and rugby for the old Northern Transvaal in the 1980/90's. More recently Roly Benade who played for Zimbabwe's U19 cricket team in the U19 Cricket World Cup a few years back, last month played in a rugby international for Zimbabwe's national rugby team, The Sables.

    Warren Carne (Zimbabwe)

  • POSTED BY MaxB on | October 21, 2007, 22:31 GMT

    It's not true that Otto Nothling was the only Australian dual international. Johnny Taylor played 20 cricket Tests between 1920 and 1926, and won two Rugby caps at fly half in 1922, playing against New Zealand Maori (scoring a try in each match). Another dual international who has been overlooked is Gregor MacGregor, a wicketkeeper in 8 Tests for England (1890-93) who played 13 Rugby internationals for Scotland between 1889 and 1896.

  • POSTED BY seanipops on | October 21, 2007, 21:09 GMT

    Simon Halliday who played centre and wing for both Bath and England in the late 80's/early 90's also has a FC hundred to his name.

  • POSTED BY Christoph on | October 21, 2007, 15:05 GMT

    Hershelle Gibbs was an astounding schoolboy talent. He played flyhalf for SA Schools. I saw him in the final of the Craven Week running the Hershelle Gibbs show. He scored what felt like 30 points against a monster Blue Bulls side. He was teasing the opposing flankers through holding the ball at them while running full pace. At one stage he received the ball behind his back in his own half. He did a full 360 degree turn and dropped the ball over, from his own half! He broke the line at will in scoring three individual tries. He never played against the All Blacks though, as he stopped playing rugby in 1993. Hansie Cronje played eight man for Free State schools and Darryll Cullinan played flyhalf for SA Universities.

  • POSTED BY choc56 on | October 21, 2007, 14:26 GMT

    From Sri Lanka, the one that springs to mind is Mahesa Rodrigo, who - get this - CAPTAINED BOTH national teams in cricket and rugby back in the forties. In his only appearance against Jeff Stollemeyer's West Indies side, he carried his bat out for 135 (he was also the keeper), prompting Stollemeyer to remark "that man Rodrigo - not only does he look like us, he bats better than the best of us!". Rodrigo was an exceptional scrum-half and also coached his club and school sides for many years after his retirement.

    Another outstanding sportsman was Jagath Fernando of Royal College, who captained the school at both sports and had a century before lunch (on way to a record 160) at the Annual Royal-St Thomas' College fixture, which is the second oldest unbroken cricket series in the world. He played for the Sri Lanka Schools team and played Premier Division cricket for a few years, but in rugby, as a phenomenal fly-half, he went on to captain the country (if I'm not mistaken).

  • POSTED BY jfgc on | October 20, 2007, 12:42 GMT

    Peter Cranmer.After St Edwards School Oxford played Rugby for England.Also Captain of Cricket for Warwickshire. Died a few years ago.

  • POSTED BY jimbrady on | October 20, 2007, 9:04 GMT

    I found the following via google as well:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Walker_(Australian_sportsman)

    Played Rugby tests for Australia and was in the Australian Cricket Tourists to South Africa in 1949/50 (but never played a Test).

  • POSTED BY jimbrady on | October 20, 2007, 8:33 GMT

    Ray Lindwall? (He played Rugby League though.) His partner Keith Miller was a top Australian Rules footballer as well. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Lindwall

  • POSTED BY gasman on | October 20, 2007, 5:42 GMT

    Tony Harris SA Rugby 5 tests vs N Z 1937 [2] vs Brit Isles [3] in 1938.SA Cricket 3 caps 1947 to 1949.Played 55 first class games scoring over 3000 runs

  • POSTED BY CUBESY73 on | October 20, 2007, 4:37 GMT

    Michael Kasprowicz played Rugby for the Australian Schoolboys (noted in his Cricinfo profile). His brother Simon was a top level rugby player for both QLD & NSW although I am not sure of his cricketing ablity

  • POSTED BY Sanju123 on | October 19, 2007, 15:15 GMT

    As far as I know, Muttiah Muralitharan is also a good rugby player who played for his scool-St.Anthenies College,Kandy, Sri Lanka

  • POSTED BY meanmachinefan on | October 19, 2007, 14:58 GMT

    I seem to remember reading that Naas Botha identified Herschelle Gibbs as a most promising fly-half when he was still a schoolboy, and Lee Barnard was also a provincial fly-half. Of course quite a few cricketers have been international hockey players such as Noel Day and Jonty Rhodes.

  • POSTED BY TheFamousEccles on | October 19, 2007, 13:53 GMT

    Eddie Barlow was a very good center who played provincial rugby and once played against a British and Irish Lions team (in contacts, although he played cricket in glasses). He played rugby like he played his cricket -- aggressive and bustling.

  • POSTED BY muraliv on | October 19, 2007, 11:26 GMT

    To my memory George Gregan was a handy cricketer, playing club cricket in the ACT, Australia - when he decided to go with rugby

  • POSTED BY Ranjansingh on | October 19, 2007, 10:42 GMT

    As a fan of both rugby, rugby league, Aussie rule footy, It is really refreshing to read this article. I have had the opportunity of meeting the great AB winger and black caps all rounder Jeoff Wilson. An interesting personality indeed.

    Ashantha De Mel, current chairman of selectors of the Sri Lanka team and former test player, played rugby for his schools Issipathana and Royal College. Roshan Mahanama played as a winger for his school, Nalanda. So did Chandrishan Perera, A Sri Lankan ruggerite and a first class cricketer. There are so many. Unlike in NZ where at the junior level both games are played and the dream is to play rugby, In Sri Lanka rugby is played and everybody wants to represent cricket at the test level. It is not because of the love lost for the great rugby, but because of SL play average rugby in the international level. Many cricketers love watching rugby in Colombo. Current captain Mahela can be seen in rugby games.

  • POSTED BY visn on | October 19, 2007, 7:48 GMT

    Errol Stewart, who played for South Africa, and had to commit to the Sharks and Dolphins when the season overlapped. To quote cricinfo " and outside cricket he was a top rugby player, a member of the Natal Sharks side which won the Currie Cup in 1995". He really sticks out.

  • POSTED BY murf on | October 19, 2007, 6:26 GMT

    Another strange Zimbabwean one was Dave Curtis - he represented Zimbabwe at cricket at schoolboy level (and had one or two senior representative games prior to test status) and then moved to Ireland where he represented Ireland at rugby for about 5 years at center during the late 1980's and early 1990's - I am sure he played for them in the 1991 World Cup.Also a talented golfer, he could well have played junior golf for Zimbabwe too.

  • POSTED BY rabbitoh on | October 19, 2007, 2:30 GMT

    Les Johns. Played League for Australia & Cricket for NSW. Graeme Hughes played League & cricket for NSW.

  • POSTED BY Grutness on | October 18, 2007, 22:11 GMT

    Jeff Wilson could easily have been more than just a double-international, had he been able to weave the various seasons together. His first love was basketball, and he represented the South Island at schoolboy level. Amazingly, after retiring from cricket for the second time, he toyed with the idea of horseracing, as a driver of a trotting sulky. He's been involved as a racehorse trainer, and has now gone back to rugby as a coach. An impressive all-rounder, in more senses than one. ~~~~

  • POSTED BY DHHC on | October 18, 2007, 20:31 GMT

    ....and Alan Hewson - who, as someone mentioned earlier, kept Robbie Deans out of the All Blacks for many a year also played first class cricket for Wellington. Stephen Flemming was a very useful centre at age grade representative level, so i hear. /'/'/'

  • POSTED BY igorolman on | October 18, 2007, 17:47 GMT

    Marcus Rose? He was Dusty Hare's replacement at full-back in the England team of the early 80's and I seem to recall he played at Oxbridge ... he was in the TV show SuperStars on the one occasion they had a cricket round (against a bowling machine and 10 fielders) and they made a big thing of him being a former player ... and he was out first ball!

  • POSTED BY cmac on | October 18, 2007, 15:39 GMT

    there are many Australian Test cricketers to have also been successful Australian Rules Footballers like Keith Miller, Simon O'Donnell, Max Walker and many others. (in fact i think there was a cricinfo article about this earlier this year.)

  • POSTED BY SouthernSoftie on | October 18, 2007, 14:48 GMT

    Robin Smith was a very fine rugby player. He wanted to continue to play rugby for a local club side in Hampshire, Romsey RFC, to help his fitness ahead of an England tour but was not allowed to by the England management in fear of him getting injured. But he was a good player back in South Africa and, on retirement from cricket, turned out for Romsey Veterans a couple of years ago!

  • POSTED BY Bazz on | October 18, 2007, 14:43 GMT

    People forget about greats for SA such as Peter Kirsten, he was an outstanding fly half for WP as well as a great cricketer and also Morne Du Plessis played rugby for Sa and cricket for WP.

  • POSTED BY CaptainPedant on | October 18, 2007, 12:52 GMT

    Peter Squires? Excellent wing-threequarter unfortunate enough to play in the days when English wingers didn't get the ball even if we had it, and county cricketer.

  • POSTED BY HuwRichards on | October 18, 2007, 12:26 GMT

    Turnbull is only one of a large number of Welsh cricket and rugby players - Glamorgan have fielded as many men who have played rugby for Wales as cricket for England, although we tend to blame the England selectors for that. The last of them was Keith Jarrett, who played a couple of matches against touring teams in 1967 but is much better known for scoring 19 points - then a record - on his debut for Wales against England in the same year. There were four Glamorgan players - Viv Jenkins, Wilf Wooller, Ronnie Boon and Turnbull - in the first Welsh team to win at Twickenham in 1933. Among those of more recent vintage Tony Lewis played rugby for Cambridge University and Pontypool and Steve James played at a decent standard (and is here in Paris at the moment reporting the Rugby World Cup).

  • POSTED BY Turlough on | October 18, 2007, 11:46 GMT

    All-rounder (in every sense) Neil Doak represented Ireland thirty-times at cricket, a career which incorporated a knock of 84* against Surrey in the 1996 Benson & Hedges Cup. At the same year's European Championships in Denmark, his off-spin returned figures of 4-44 against Denmark and 4-9 against Gibraltar in consecutive games. A member of the talented Irish squad which narrowly missed out on a World Cup spot at the 1997 ICC Trophy in Malaysia (where he repeated the 4-9 trick, this time against Israel), he played two First Class games against Scotland and last represented Ireland in 2000.

    Doak came even closer to representing Ireland at a World Cup in 2003, when he was selected for the Irish squad which contested that year's RWC in Australia. Unfortunately, Doak (an Ulster scrum-half) saw no playing time at the tournament and, in fact, was never capped for the national team. He retired from rugby in 2005.

  • POSTED BY Turlough on | October 18, 2007, 11:46 GMT

    All-rounder (in every sense) Neil Doak represented Ireland thirty-times at cricket, a career which incorporated a knock of 84* against Surrey in the 1996 Benson & Hedges Cup. At the same year's European Championships in Denmark, his off-spin returned figures of 4-44 against Denmark and 4-9 against Gibraltar in consecutive games. A member of the talented Irish squad which narrowly missed out on a World Cup spot at the 1997 ICC Trophy in Malaysia (where he repeated the 4-9 trick, this time against Israel), he played two First Class games against Scotland and last represented Ireland in 2000.

    Doak came even closer to representing Ireland at a World Cup in 2003, when he was selected for the Irish squad which contested that year's RWC in Australia. Unfortunately, Doak (an Ulster scrum-half) saw no playing time at the tournament and, in fact, was never capped for the national team. He retired from rugby in 2005.

  • POSTED BY BigZoom on | October 18, 2007, 10:50 GMT

    Rod Latham (former NZ Test and One Day cricket international in the early 1990's) played fullback for the Canterbury rugby side during their record Ranfurly Shield reign in the early - mid 1980's.

    He competed for the Canterbury rugby fullback position with Robbie Deans (NZ Rugby fullback in mid 1980's) who also played for the New Zealand colts cricket side (under 20) in 1980 (I think) on their tour to Australia.

    The NZ Colts side also included Latham, Martin Crowe and 1987 world cup winning All Black number 10, Grant Fox, who was at least the equal of Rob Andrew (and scored many more points).

    I don't have the records but am assured (by the Coach of that NZ Colts side) that both Deans and Fox had the potential to go on to play first class cricket at the least.

    Popular opinion at the time was that Rod Latham would have made the All Blacks were it not for Deans and Alan Hewson . . .

  • POSTED BY stella on | October 18, 2007, 10:05 GMT

    Obviously I can't read - Donnelly is already there...as compensation, what about Wilfred Wooller, famous Welsh rugby international and Glamorgan all-rounder?

  • POSTED BY stella on | October 18, 2007, 9:51 GMT

    No doubt many have mentioned Martin Donnelly, NZ test batsmen, played a lot in England in the 30's & 40's and who also played test rugby for England.

    Don Clarke, a famous All Black of the 50's and 60's also played successfully for Northern Districts at first class level.

  • POSTED BY Clive_the_Greek on | October 18, 2007, 9:41 GMT

    Peter Squire - a successful wing with England at rugby and many appearances for Yorkshire at cricket - should be in the list. There must be lots of people who have shone at one sport and made the odd appearance at the other. They include England fullback Bob Hiller and fly half Alan Old (brother of Chris Old of course) who have both played first-class cricket. And, the other way round, I remember RDV Knight, best known as a cricketer, as a fine rugby player at Cambridge.

  • POSTED BY djnz on | October 18, 2007, 8:30 GMT

    I think AB de Villiers was very useful at rugby as well as a number of other sports and Herscelle Gibbs played against the ALl Blacks in 1996 I think.

  • POSTED BY PastorDave on | October 18, 2007, 8:12 GMT

    Gerbrand Grobler - South African first class cricketer and rugby player. Won the South African elite competition (Currie Cup) final playing both cricket and rugby.

  • POSTED BY murf on | October 18, 2007, 6:02 GMT

    Rhodesia/Zimbabwe has been blessed with a number of talented dual internationals - Guy Whittal and Craig Evans of the modern era while Terry Bowes in the mid 1970's was an exception in that he also represented Rhodesia at golf.However at that time we were in sporting isolation and played most of our sport under the guise of a South African province so this might not be regarded as International representation.

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  • POSTED BY murf on | October 18, 2007, 6:02 GMT

    Rhodesia/Zimbabwe has been blessed with a number of talented dual internationals - Guy Whittal and Craig Evans of the modern era while Terry Bowes in the mid 1970's was an exception in that he also represented Rhodesia at golf.However at that time we were in sporting isolation and played most of our sport under the guise of a South African province so this might not be regarded as International representation.

  • POSTED BY PastorDave on | October 18, 2007, 8:12 GMT

    Gerbrand Grobler - South African first class cricketer and rugby player. Won the South African elite competition (Currie Cup) final playing both cricket and rugby.

  • POSTED BY djnz on | October 18, 2007, 8:30 GMT

    I think AB de Villiers was very useful at rugby as well as a number of other sports and Herscelle Gibbs played against the ALl Blacks in 1996 I think.

  • POSTED BY Clive_the_Greek on | October 18, 2007, 9:41 GMT

    Peter Squire - a successful wing with England at rugby and many appearances for Yorkshire at cricket - should be in the list. There must be lots of people who have shone at one sport and made the odd appearance at the other. They include England fullback Bob Hiller and fly half Alan Old (brother of Chris Old of course) who have both played first-class cricket. And, the other way round, I remember RDV Knight, best known as a cricketer, as a fine rugby player at Cambridge.

  • POSTED BY stella on | October 18, 2007, 9:51 GMT

    No doubt many have mentioned Martin Donnelly, NZ test batsmen, played a lot in England in the 30's & 40's and who also played test rugby for England.

    Don Clarke, a famous All Black of the 50's and 60's also played successfully for Northern Districts at first class level.

  • POSTED BY stella on | October 18, 2007, 10:05 GMT

    Obviously I can't read - Donnelly is already there...as compensation, what about Wilfred Wooller, famous Welsh rugby international and Glamorgan all-rounder?

  • POSTED BY BigZoom on | October 18, 2007, 10:50 GMT

    Rod Latham (former NZ Test and One Day cricket international in the early 1990's) played fullback for the Canterbury rugby side during their record Ranfurly Shield reign in the early - mid 1980's.

    He competed for the Canterbury rugby fullback position with Robbie Deans (NZ Rugby fullback in mid 1980's) who also played for the New Zealand colts cricket side (under 20) in 1980 (I think) on their tour to Australia.

    The NZ Colts side also included Latham, Martin Crowe and 1987 world cup winning All Black number 10, Grant Fox, who was at least the equal of Rob Andrew (and scored many more points).

    I don't have the records but am assured (by the Coach of that NZ Colts side) that both Deans and Fox had the potential to go on to play first class cricket at the least.

    Popular opinion at the time was that Rod Latham would have made the All Blacks were it not for Deans and Alan Hewson . . .

  • POSTED BY Turlough on | October 18, 2007, 11:46 GMT

    All-rounder (in every sense) Neil Doak represented Ireland thirty-times at cricket, a career which incorporated a knock of 84* against Surrey in the 1996 Benson & Hedges Cup. At the same year's European Championships in Denmark, his off-spin returned figures of 4-44 against Denmark and 4-9 against Gibraltar in consecutive games. A member of the talented Irish squad which narrowly missed out on a World Cup spot at the 1997 ICC Trophy in Malaysia (where he repeated the 4-9 trick, this time against Israel), he played two First Class games against Scotland and last represented Ireland in 2000.

    Doak came even closer to representing Ireland at a World Cup in 2003, when he was selected for the Irish squad which contested that year's RWC in Australia. Unfortunately, Doak (an Ulster scrum-half) saw no playing time at the tournament and, in fact, was never capped for the national team. He retired from rugby in 2005.

  • POSTED BY Turlough on | October 18, 2007, 11:46 GMT

    All-rounder (in every sense) Neil Doak represented Ireland thirty-times at cricket, a career which incorporated a knock of 84* against Surrey in the 1996 Benson & Hedges Cup. At the same year's European Championships in Denmark, his off-spin returned figures of 4-44 against Denmark and 4-9 against Gibraltar in consecutive games. A member of the talented Irish squad which narrowly missed out on a World Cup spot at the 1997 ICC Trophy in Malaysia (where he repeated the 4-9 trick, this time against Israel), he played two First Class games against Scotland and last represented Ireland in 2000.

    Doak came even closer to representing Ireland at a World Cup in 2003, when he was selected for the Irish squad which contested that year's RWC in Australia. Unfortunately, Doak (an Ulster scrum-half) saw no playing time at the tournament and, in fact, was never capped for the national team. He retired from rugby in 2005.

  • POSTED BY HuwRichards on | October 18, 2007, 12:26 GMT

    Turnbull is only one of a large number of Welsh cricket and rugby players - Glamorgan have fielded as many men who have played rugby for Wales as cricket for England, although we tend to blame the England selectors for that. The last of them was Keith Jarrett, who played a couple of matches against touring teams in 1967 but is much better known for scoring 19 points - then a record - on his debut for Wales against England in the same year. There were four Glamorgan players - Viv Jenkins, Wilf Wooller, Ronnie Boon and Turnbull - in the first Welsh team to win at Twickenham in 1933. Among those of more recent vintage Tony Lewis played rugby for Cambridge University and Pontypool and Steve James played at a decent standard (and is here in Paris at the moment reporting the Rugby World Cup).