April 19, 2009

Indian Premier League

The Golden Oldies

Judhajit
Sachin Tendulkar drives powerfully, Chennai Super Kings v Mumbai Indians, IPL, 1st game, Cape Town, April 18, 2009
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It's strike one for the old boys on the opening day of the IPL. Half-centuries for Sachin Tendulkar and Rahul Dravid, a fifer for Anil Kumble (and not to forget, a spell of wizardry from Shane Warne.). By moving to South Africa, the IPL, threatening to become the instrument of anhilation (and professional humiliation) for India’s ageing greats, could actually become the stage for them to show off the many layers of their skill, feels Sharda Ugra in her blog on the India Today website.

Every innings will need its glue, its master craftsman around whom the hitters can bat and it was hardly surprising that Tendulkar and Dravid finished on top last night. In the space of ten days they have left behind the format that allows for the creation of the sweeping masterpiece and last night still found the space and time to paint the perfect miniature. No matter what the canvas, it is always the hand of the artist that matters.

The multiple-captain theory was perhaps nothing but a decoy with Sourav Ganguly, despite a string of open denials and many subtle signals, finally being divested from the Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR's) throne. Bobili Vijay Kumar in the Times of India believes that by suddenly giving complete charge to Brendon McCullum, the team have unwittingly let the wily cat out of the bag.

Imagine the plight of the bowler who has just got a set of instructions from the bowling captain and an entirely different message from the fielding captain (by his placements). Worse, what happens if all three disagree?

He is regarded as one of the pioneers of big-hitting, though Sanath Jayasuriya believes it's his natural game and that he doesn't know any other way to play. He has made some adjustments, but the attacking brand has been his staple diet and has worked for him for years. GS Vivek gets talking to the Sri Lankan batsman in the Indian Express.

You have been around for more than a decade in international cricket. At 39, how long is it before you call it quits?

(Laughs) Don’t ask me how long. I don’t know the answer myself. As long as my body says I’m fine, I’ll keep coming back to bat. I try and take it series by series without looking at any specific period of time. It’s been going well so far, and I hope to carry on. And I’m not even the oldest player here.

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