Technique March 1, 2010

Tendulkar double ton reiterates technique

 
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Technique is perhaps one of the most important things that distinguish a good cricketer from a great cricketer; Tendulkar's great innings told us just that © Associated Press
 

Only the God of cricket could have made a daunting 200 look so effortless. The game of numbers isn’t one for Sachin; he has gone well past that. That evening on the 25th February, Tendulkar didn’t just break an overwhelming record, he narrated cricket’s lost story. The double ton, perhaps, brought back, the passé ‘technique’ into the game. My admiration of Tendulkar’s masterclass didn’t just stop at the record, but the manner in which he pulled it off.

You would assume that a certain amount of slogging is almost mandatory to score a double century in fifty overs. But Sachin proved that it can be done by playing good cricket and knocking some skillful cricketing shots. The reason why Sachin doesn’t need to slog his way to big runs is his impeccable technique.

Ironically though, talking technique has almost become blasphemous in modern day cricket. No longer is it only about the number of runs you score, the strike-rate at which those runs are scored is equally important if not more, especially in the shorter formats. Perhaps, there is seemingly nothing wrong about thinking in terms of strike-rate because that makes for entertaining cricket. Innovation is not an aberration anymore but a norm.

While most cricketers playing international cricket are capable of changing gears and adapting to the new demands of the game, a whole crop of youngsters trying to break into their respective state under-16, under-19 teams are not. To a young mind, the easiest way to score quickly is to take the aerial route and play adventurous shots. The impression a youngster carries is that technique restricts you from playing all the shots and hence slows you down. Little do they realize that in reality, technique empowers you to play almost every shot in the book or perhaps more. It’s the technical dexterity and not slogging which enabled Sachin to score a double century off merely 147 balls.

I see that the role of a cricket coach more important now than ever before. He ought to help a youngster find the right balance and ensure that he doesn’t sacrifice technique for adventure. But are these coaches well equipped to ensure that a youngster doesn’t go astray? The answer is an unfortunate No. Only a few cricket academies in the country are run by qualified coaches. Others are merely organized net practice facilities which would rarely produce good cricketers. We may not be able to organize the cricket-academy sector but we can always ensure that the coaches working with the state teams at all levels are qualified coaches. After all the BCCI organizes coaching clinics on a regular basis producing Level 1, 2 and 3 coaches. These coaches in turn should be absorbed by the state associations.

I watched a Ranji Trophy probable bowling big no-balls and all that the coaches around could possible tell him was a feeble ‘stop overstepping’. No one would tell him how to do it. Poor kid kept bowling for nearly an hour with no success. I felt sorry for the boy because it wasn’t his fault. It’s the duty of the coach to rectify mistakes, but sadly, they couldn’t. If this being the state of affairs at the First class level, pity how things would be at levels below Ranji. The way forward is most certainly a sound lesson in technique, for you can break a rule only when you know it.

Technique is perhaps one of the most important things that distinguish a good cricketer from a great cricketer. And the God of the Cricket told us just that.

Former India opener Aakash Chopra is the author of Out of the Blue, an account of Rajasthan's 2010-11 Ranji Trophy victory. His website is here and his Twitter feed here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Bakshish Singh on September 22, 2010, 2:44 GMT

    Its also more the atttitude of the younger generation players to emulate the more successful Sachin or Sehwag. They should realize that it requires special grace to become a Sehwag or a Sachin. But with Sheer hard practice and developing the mental determination one can become a Dravid. People should realize that Dravid is a great cricketer and once the basics are right one can play all the shots in the book as Dravid has proved time and again. It is important that the coaches reiterate the focus on sound technique and strong fundamentals. In the T20 era it is tough for young cricketers to accept this fact.Even the younger indian players like the Rainas, Karthiks and the Pathans look to play more Ariel shots. Probably their strength may lie in that as of now but that will not give the required consistency and cannot give them the big hundreds on a consistent basis.

  • Ella SoullessGhost on May 10, 2010, 20:45 GMT

    Truly interesting story u have here. It would be great to read more concerning such theme. Thanks for posting such information.

  • M. Omair on March 5, 2010, 13:04 GMT

    Now Tendulkar is the best. He is better than others but I think Dravid is very very near to him. It is debatable that either Dravid is better or Ponting.

    Tendulkar now scored more than 30000 runs against 15 to 16 countries in different grounds more than 50 all over the world.

    Whenever we compare him Sir Bradman, we neglect the fact that he is still going on. So I think actual comparison will come after his retirement which may be in 2015.

    In my opinion both are legend. One legend from past and another one in present. Beside average, Sir. Bradman career has too much limitation like in top 100 wicket takers in test, he faced five and for 150, only seven including Voce with 98 wickets. For top 30, he faced none. But again this was not his fault, at that time, cricket pace was slow. Timeless matches were there, which again was not his fault. In actual only two teams were there. He played only ten ground totally with five each in both regions but he is the best batsman of his time.

  • prasad on March 4, 2010, 19:11 GMT

    No doubt, sachin is god of cricket and, The best part of sachin is yet to come..............

  • Zeeshan Ahmed on March 4, 2010, 5:47 GMT

    Dear Arun, whatever I said is all true about Sir. Bradman, I think you do not want to see big picture. It is very easy to score 200 against Bangladesh but came to face Marshall, Robert, Garner and Holding, even you are unable to score 100.

    Bradman runs per inning against England is 79.8 and Lara 58.5 so actual difference is 21 runs but Lara faced it one out of nine teams. If Lara scored 5031 runs against England then Bradman 6863 runs, see diff.

    Even when he started his career, there was great depression, people were thinking about bread and butter, not cricket.

    Even I mentioned the fact that he only played one out of 50 leading wicket taker, do not make you understand the way of cricket at that time.

    Did you know about Headley, his average was 71.23 against England, but he had not timeless matches against them but came to Australia drastically change to 37.33. If he was batsman in Australia, he could easily change it from 71.23 to how much, we do not know the exact.

  • tejasvi on March 4, 2010, 3:05 GMT

    he is the best batsmen ever in world & no one can beat the records of him & he will do the higest indiviual score in test matches also...

  • Amin Aijaz on March 4, 2010, 2:30 GMT

    So whose innings between, Sachin Tendulkar's 200* on a batting paradise or Saeed Anwar's 194 on a Chennai hot day is a better one? No doubt Anwar's was the better one as the innings came in an era where T20 didn't exist and a team scoring 300 was considered an amazing score, at par with today's team scoring a 400. High strike-rates was uncommon in the 1990s. No ball changes after 34 overs and only 15 overs of powerplay existed as against the 20 overs of today where the batsmen decide 5 of them.

    It wont be long before a Virender Sehwag or a Chris Gayle will scale the peak of 200. Already last year we had a 194* from Charles Coventry from Zimbabwe equalling the then world record. And this man couldn't get enough strike in the end else he could easily had gone past the 200-mark. So all in all, a great innings by Sachin but certainly not the greatest one. Anwar's was greater.

  • zxaar on March 3, 2010, 9:26 GMT

    This is my last comment, sorry akash for out of topic comment.

    "but to compare him with the great sir vivian is not advicable. just compare the strike rates and averages of bowlers Sir vivian faced all his life and the little master facing in recent times."

    i checked viv richard's records. Pak was better bowling attach in 80s, richards average 31 against them in 41 matches. He never hit odi century against pak. Further i checked richards average 8 against sarfraz nawaz and 7.5 against qadir. The same qadir whose career was cut short by young sachin. So yes, there is no comparison with sachin. We know who better odi bat is. (by the way sachin has faced better bowlers all through out his career).

  • Aakash Chopra on March 3, 2010, 8:59 GMT

    Dear readers, thanks a lot for your comments. Really overwhelmed by the response. Please keep reading and writing in. I always try to read all the comments. Your feedback is precious :) You can also follow me on Twitter for a more personalized contact. My handle--cricketaakash Thanks, Aakash ps: @Naresh...thanks a lot. :)

  • XERSES on March 3, 2010, 6:42 GMT

    And then there is Brian Lara !

  • Bakshish Singh on September 22, 2010, 2:44 GMT

    Its also more the atttitude of the younger generation players to emulate the more successful Sachin or Sehwag. They should realize that it requires special grace to become a Sehwag or a Sachin. But with Sheer hard practice and developing the mental determination one can become a Dravid. People should realize that Dravid is a great cricketer and once the basics are right one can play all the shots in the book as Dravid has proved time and again. It is important that the coaches reiterate the focus on sound technique and strong fundamentals. In the T20 era it is tough for young cricketers to accept this fact.Even the younger indian players like the Rainas, Karthiks and the Pathans look to play more Ariel shots. Probably their strength may lie in that as of now but that will not give the required consistency and cannot give them the big hundreds on a consistent basis.

  • Ella SoullessGhost on May 10, 2010, 20:45 GMT

    Truly interesting story u have here. It would be great to read more concerning such theme. Thanks for posting such information.

  • M. Omair on March 5, 2010, 13:04 GMT

    Now Tendulkar is the best. He is better than others but I think Dravid is very very near to him. It is debatable that either Dravid is better or Ponting.

    Tendulkar now scored more than 30000 runs against 15 to 16 countries in different grounds more than 50 all over the world.

    Whenever we compare him Sir Bradman, we neglect the fact that he is still going on. So I think actual comparison will come after his retirement which may be in 2015.

    In my opinion both are legend. One legend from past and another one in present. Beside average, Sir. Bradman career has too much limitation like in top 100 wicket takers in test, he faced five and for 150, only seven including Voce with 98 wickets. For top 30, he faced none. But again this was not his fault, at that time, cricket pace was slow. Timeless matches were there, which again was not his fault. In actual only two teams were there. He played only ten ground totally with five each in both regions but he is the best batsman of his time.

  • prasad on March 4, 2010, 19:11 GMT

    No doubt, sachin is god of cricket and, The best part of sachin is yet to come..............

  • Zeeshan Ahmed on March 4, 2010, 5:47 GMT

    Dear Arun, whatever I said is all true about Sir. Bradman, I think you do not want to see big picture. It is very easy to score 200 against Bangladesh but came to face Marshall, Robert, Garner and Holding, even you are unable to score 100.

    Bradman runs per inning against England is 79.8 and Lara 58.5 so actual difference is 21 runs but Lara faced it one out of nine teams. If Lara scored 5031 runs against England then Bradman 6863 runs, see diff.

    Even when he started his career, there was great depression, people were thinking about bread and butter, not cricket.

    Even I mentioned the fact that he only played one out of 50 leading wicket taker, do not make you understand the way of cricket at that time.

    Did you know about Headley, his average was 71.23 against England, but he had not timeless matches against them but came to Australia drastically change to 37.33. If he was batsman in Australia, he could easily change it from 71.23 to how much, we do not know the exact.

  • tejasvi on March 4, 2010, 3:05 GMT

    he is the best batsmen ever in world & no one can beat the records of him & he will do the higest indiviual score in test matches also...

  • Amin Aijaz on March 4, 2010, 2:30 GMT

    So whose innings between, Sachin Tendulkar's 200* on a batting paradise or Saeed Anwar's 194 on a Chennai hot day is a better one? No doubt Anwar's was the better one as the innings came in an era where T20 didn't exist and a team scoring 300 was considered an amazing score, at par with today's team scoring a 400. High strike-rates was uncommon in the 1990s. No ball changes after 34 overs and only 15 overs of powerplay existed as against the 20 overs of today where the batsmen decide 5 of them.

    It wont be long before a Virender Sehwag or a Chris Gayle will scale the peak of 200. Already last year we had a 194* from Charles Coventry from Zimbabwe equalling the then world record. And this man couldn't get enough strike in the end else he could easily had gone past the 200-mark. So all in all, a great innings by Sachin but certainly not the greatest one. Anwar's was greater.

  • zxaar on March 3, 2010, 9:26 GMT

    This is my last comment, sorry akash for out of topic comment.

    "but to compare him with the great sir vivian is not advicable. just compare the strike rates and averages of bowlers Sir vivian faced all his life and the little master facing in recent times."

    i checked viv richard's records. Pak was better bowling attach in 80s, richards average 31 against them in 41 matches. He never hit odi century against pak. Further i checked richards average 8 against sarfraz nawaz and 7.5 against qadir. The same qadir whose career was cut short by young sachin. So yes, there is no comparison with sachin. We know who better odi bat is. (by the way sachin has faced better bowlers all through out his career).

  • Aakash Chopra on March 3, 2010, 8:59 GMT

    Dear readers, thanks a lot for your comments. Really overwhelmed by the response. Please keep reading and writing in. I always try to read all the comments. Your feedback is precious :) You can also follow me on Twitter for a more personalized contact. My handle--cricketaakash Thanks, Aakash ps: @Naresh...thanks a lot. :)

  • XERSES on March 3, 2010, 6:42 GMT

    And then there is Brian Lara !

  • NARESH PATEL on March 3, 2010, 6:29 GMT

    THIS COMMENT IS RESERVED SPECIALLY FOR AKASH CHOPRA. YOU ARE A GREAT WRITER, BUT I THINK YOU COULD BECOME AN EVEN BETTER BATTING COACH YOURSELF. YOU ARE ONE PERSON THAT PLAYED FOR INDIA AND MAY HAVE BEEN A GOOD TEST PROSPECT IF THEY HAD PERSISTED WITH YOU.

  • Arun on March 3, 2010, 4:08 GMT

    Continued from earlier post: Mahela Jayawardene appears to have a better technique than Sehwag, and yet Sehwag has made at least as many runs in non-subcontinental conditions. (Also significant, since Sehwag is an opener and often has to face a swinging ball, while MJ comes in at #4 or #5). My untutored take on this is that technique makes up for lack of natural talent (Dravid is a prime example, though his mind is his biggest asset). But, if you are blessed with the natural talent, you probably don't need "coaching manual" technique, and it probably hinders your natural ability. My two cents :)

  • Arun on March 3, 2010, 3:44 GMT

    @Vikas: Richards and Bradman were both 39-40 yrs when they retired. I don't think a fit batsman, in form has any problem lasting that long (bowlers are a different class of animal altogether).

    @Zeeshan: All you say about Bradman is true, but nobody else was near him. The likes of Sutcliffe, Weekes, etc never averaged more than 60. He was certainly better than the rest, though perhaps would not have averaged 99.96 had he been playing the modern game. Still, the fact remains. It's like the sehwag argument: some people don't think much of Sehwag's destructive abilities, saying he fills his boots on flatter/truer surfaces, but we don't see his contemporaries scoring as much and as quickly as he does, on the same tracks. Had he acquired a tight technique like T'kar, maybe people would have more respect. Which, brings us to technique: IVA Richards was not technically sound, and neither is Sehwag. Techique is but the guinea's stamp.The runs are the true gold.

  • thomasfromtaiwan on March 3, 2010, 1:12 GMT

    truly sachin is a class apart from other batsman of his era. but to compare him with the great sir vivian is not advicable. just compare the strike rates and averages of bowlers Sir vivian faced all his life and the little master facing in recent times. This 200 is not great even not the best innings. With tiny grounds( soon the grounds will become as small as 30 yards circle) and feather bed pitches even the greatest of bowler will be looking like a bowling machine. To name a few, Sachin's greatness lies in back to back desert storm innings against australia, his ruthless attack against pakistan in WC and his composed attack against warney and co in chennai. Helmets, protection gear,Switch hits,powerplays,free hits and ball change,all these favor the batsmen,not the bowlers.If a bowler bowls one ball over the stumps and the 2nd one around the stumps without informing umpire,whether the batsman will be able to take it??give equal status to bowlers and then praise the records of batsmen

  • Tariq Javed on March 3, 2010, 1:03 GMT

    There are some differences between Pakistan and India but on this master batsman "THE" Sachin there is no difference .We admire him in Pakistan as much as he is amired in India or anywhere in the world .Long live Mr. Sachin Tendulkar....

  • granty on March 2, 2010, 23:36 GMT

    Sachin is a great player there is no doubt I have seen Viv.Amazing player.However I do not want to compare.This is Sachin era let us enjoy. while he is still here

  • zxaar on March 2, 2010, 22:44 GMT

    @Vinit Singh Sharma

    " Honestly, it is simply ridiculous for a side to score 400 in an ODI innings, and any "record" made on the sub continent should be null & void.... "

    do you also think that the ground where 430+ was chased by SA is also in sub-continent??

    plus do you honestly think out-side sub-continent there is no flat and small pitch.

    Do you know what was the best score before this on this small-flat pitch. (i give you hint it was under 300).

  • manchalas on March 2, 2010, 22:21 GMT

    My All Time Rankings

    1) Virender Sehwag: Fearless,Real HERO 2) Don Bradman: Great Average 3) Sachin Tendulkar: True Class,Longevity 4) Brian Lara: Stylish 5) Vivian Richards: Aggressive,Entertaining 6) Rahul Dravid: True "Test Material",WALL 7) Ricky Ponting: Good batsman

  • DPAK on March 2, 2010, 19:06 GMT

    SACHIN-THE GOD OF CRICKET HAS ONCE AGAIN PROVED THAT WHATS BEING GOD IS ALL ABOUT...AND I M SURE THE HONOUR OF ' SIR' IS NOT FAR AWAY FROM SACHIN

  • Radha on March 2, 2010, 18:44 GMT

    I partially agree with you on technique. Remember the recent blast by Brendon in a T20 match, 90% of the scoring was done through some innovative shots. Or even Dhoni's 183 against SL. On your day, whether with a great technique or innovation, you are bound to get a big score. No exceptions, either Tendulkars or McCullams

  • Nishaad on March 2, 2010, 16:05 GMT

    The greatest thing about sachin is his desire for success. He is very humble and a great student of the game. I have not seen Viv or the Don bat. But to play for india, for 20 long years, with the weight of a nation's expectation is in itself a great achievement. With Age he has added a real price on his wicket. I feel the youngsters sharing the dressing room are really lucky to watch him prepare for a game. Even after 20 years many people would switch off their television sets once sachin is back in the pavilion. Such is the greatness of this man! All hail Sachin!

  • Ian Whitchurch on March 2, 2010, 15:55 GMT

    Great batsmen play great innings to win test matches. The Little Master does that.

    He has had an amazing career, and I am proud to say I have been amazed to watch him bat.

    But can we kindly drop the crap about Bradman vs Tendulkar ? Different eras, different pitches, different bowlers. Yes, I understand that many fans like Tendulkar a lot, but praising him for his ability to handle Dale Steyn is damning the Little Master with faint praise.

    Calm down, forget the Bradman vs Richards vs Tendulkar thing, and just enjoy him for what he is - one of the best there ever was.

  • Vinayak on March 2, 2010, 13:48 GMT

    i am wondering how sad MRF must be that Tendya hit a 200 and the bat displays Adidas in these historic pictures :). this inability to value what he is, is also the story of all the people who have asked him to retire or keep asking him when. they still dont realise this man is different from the rest and we shouldn't be measuring him to our ordinary standards.

    On youtube there's a "making of sachin" documentary that was made when he was 25. It has his interviews from when he was 15-16 and you can see how grounded yet very decidedly determined he is. There's a moment when Mohinder Amarnath asks him if he'll be scared going to Pakistan for Tests and facing the likes of Imran Khan and Wasim Akram. The timid looking boy replies - "No sir, I like the ball to come fast onto my bat". He hasn't changed on bit since then :). Keep Rocking Sachin!! You are the only celebrity I look upto.

  • Anonymous on March 2, 2010, 10:23 GMT

    u r right aakash really sachin is the god of cricket

  • Zeeshan Ahmed Siddiqui on March 2, 2010, 8:40 GMT

    He is greatest one, no doubt about it. Comparison of him with Bradman is very difficult. As he scored 30000 runs as compare to his 6996 runs in two regions only in ten grounds with half career timeless.

    Five leading fast bowlers that Bradman ever faced were Allen 82 wickets, Larwood 78, Kerry Fox 60, Constantine 58 and Griffith with 44 wickets.

    For leading 50 wicket takers in test he faced only Bedser, after world war II when he started his career.

    For 100 or more wickets in career he faced only six bolwers in which three came after world war II, one died during it, one came just before world war II and remaining one left cricket in early 30 against Australia.

    From 1931 to 1937, he faced no bowler with 100 wickets.It happened only two times when bowler took 100 or more wicket at a time when he faced them that were Verity and Tate.

    No doubt, Bradman is legend due to average but dragging others that his average is 99.94 and others not are not true due to facts I mentioned.

  • J.Prem BAshani on March 2, 2010, 6:18 GMT

    Well, whatever be the differences in perception, it remains that Sachin is the greatest batsman of his times. It is natural to evoke comparison when some one achieves as much as this great man has done. Moreso when he does it with all humility and sportsmanship. The reason much is talked about his sporting exploits and the reason he is drawn into comparison with players of different era and across sports make it convincing to reason that He possibly could be the greatest Batsman of all time. What better profession can give a level playing field than sports? Therefore any talk about grounds, subcontinents, team contribution etc are rubbish. For all the critics including the expert critics, I would say that It should be remembered every one in his time enjoys the same chance and opportunity as Sachin does. But he stands apart. Similarly it is a team game and the fortunes of teh team depends on 10 other men on the field. For a batsman, it is scoring runds and scoring runs consistently.

  • Anshuman on March 2, 2010, 5:12 GMT

    paddy i think u r mistaken wen u say "bowling was weak" as styne is the is No1 bowler in icc test ranking so this cant be argued.

  • rocky on March 2, 2010, 4:54 GMT

    well done mate sachin,you proved to aussie dat ur da best cricketer of all times.ur genius.wat a mindblowing inning against south africa and the world's number one bowler(dale styen).proud of u all times.

  • Phil on March 2, 2010, 3:18 GMT

    A fine article this - I have seen the same things in grass-roots Australia - young players asking good coaches, who are trying to teach them technique, how they can slog the ball better. These fine coaches must tear their hear out,yet so many others would be perfectly happy with the always-hit-the-ball-harder philosophy. For some technique is a dirty word, whether it is batting, bowling or keeping. One can forsee a much smaller talent pool for first class cricket to draw from and a much smaller possibility of another Little Master following Gavaskar and Tendulkar. So, yes, we definetely do need more qualified coaches but qualifications aren't everything. The culture under which they operate is a far more pervasive influence. One problem is that it takes longer and a lot of hard work to do things properly. Other ways are merely shortcuts which give short term success - to a young batsman this means getting to smash bad bowling early on, but struggling against quality bowlers later.

  • Mad Hamish on March 2, 2010, 3:07 GMT

    In response to Vikas Bradman toured England in 1948 when he was 39 and made 173* on a very badly worn wicket as Australia chased over 400 to win one of the tests.

  • indian2000 on March 2, 2010, 1:25 GMT

    its not fair to degrade an innings like that.if indian pitches are flat and grounds are small then ask the visiting players to hit a 200,then i will accept sachin's achievement is not that great

  • Udayan on March 2, 2010, 1:24 GMT

    As far as a master class is concerned, Tendulkar's innings in the first test against Bangladesh was a thing of beauty. Despite the match situation, it never looked as if Tendulkar would not reach a century, and his handling of the Shakib's spin bowling was a demonstration of how it is done.

  • Prajwol Bhattarai on March 2, 2010, 0:25 GMT

    Truely a great innings. I don't think its fair to compare him with Sir Viv or the Don, but its fair to say that they would have been as much proud of him to witness that magic on that day. Every player's greatest innings are mostly in their own home grounds. Just because its a flat wicket it cannot be easy - Ponting averages under 20 in tests in India. Discussion eliminated. I would rate Sachin and Viv as the greatest ODI batsmen of their era. If they were to compete against one another, I would put my money on Sachin. Don should be not compared. He played against England - either in Aus or in England. No one talks about how good or bad the English team were back then. What if they were as good as current Zimbabawe team. But even after that not everyone has scored against Zimbabwe too much. Don did against England. What a big deal. Don and Sachin would have to be the greatest batsmen of all time and amazingly both of them were amazingly wonderful human beings too. I love that fact.

  • Rauf on March 2, 2010, 0:09 GMT

    Its funny that I still see people trying to find fault in Tendulkar's innings by saying that the ground was small, the pitch was too flat etc. People don't seem to understand that whatever the conditions are, it is a herculean task to make 200 runs and the effort must not only be appreciated but also respected. All I can say is that if there was one batsman who should have made this record it had to be none other than Sachin Tendulkar. He deserved this more than anyone else. All hail the little master

  • Rahlbose on March 1, 2010, 23:43 GMT

    Sorry don't agree at all. Sachin is great no doubt but not all his game is copy book. Guided lofts over slips, hopping outside offstump to play the ball past square leg these things don't appear in any coaching manual. Hell even his grip is not recommended. Besides the idea that technique is all important has been debunked once and for all by Sehwag.

  • Micky on March 1, 2010, 23:33 GMT

    A very relevant point Aakash. It is also true that Sachin is naturally more gifted by miles than anyone else (Lara, Sehwag etc come close). I remember an old argument against some of Gary Sobers' techniques applied in coaching; being that these techniques only work for the super talented like Sobers, Bradmans and the like. One could argue that only the gifted can make use of the classical techniques to their full advantage. Unfortunately Sachin probably will be the last of technically sound great batsmen.

  • US Indian on March 1, 2010, 18:55 GMT

    A very nice article..Akash. I always enjoyed your articles, nicely thought of and its where your first hand experience speaks. Offcourse not only Sachin but Dravid, Lakshman, Azhar, Gavaskar, ponting, Waugh bro's, Chanderpaul, Saeed Anwar, Miandad, Zaheer Abbas, Lara etc and many more have showed time and again they can accelarate scoring whenever they can and without slogging, all these players have in common is their impeccable technique and temparament. These goes well with bowling and fielding too. We lack proper fielding techniques, whether it is close in fielding or outfield, we need coaching right from the beginning to the national level, and in my opinion that should be the prime criteria for selection at any level thats were we need services of greats like Abid Ali and unfortunately Solkar is not among us. I know Indians are not natural atheletes but definitely they can be coached and groomed to become good atheletes. India should refrain from these foreign coach obsession.

  • Samuel Sukhnandan on March 1, 2010, 15:44 GMT

    I admire Sachin, he bats with class. All the cricketing world should be proud of him. Sachin a MASTER.

  • paddy on March 1, 2010, 14:58 GMT

    Its a known fact that Sachin is among the greatest that the world has ever produced.People cannot say, do it at MCG or Lords, when a time comes great scores will be made there too,but someone will say, we did not have a Mcgrath or Lee or Akram or Imran to score against. people can say, bowling was weak, so batsman scored.Opportunities does not come always, use the opportunity well and become a star. thats the simplest possible explanation given. Belinda Clarke's 200+ in ODI, is also great one.for the woman's cricket, the performance is outstanding too. may be someone will ask, Belinda score against Mcgrath or someone. these kinds of irrelevant arguements should be ignored, and the fact of records should always be praised, wherever its made. Even Ponting has so many chances against Zim, Bangladesh, why he did not.just the right time , a day when everything went well for Sachin+ his wonderful talent and commitment made everything possible to make him reach 200

  • Vinit Singh Sharma on March 1, 2010, 14:30 GMT

    Yes that's correct: slogging isn't necessary to make big scores- just keep making the grounds smaller & smaller, and the pitches flatter & flatter. It is like running the 100 metre sprint over only 80 metres and then jumping for joy because someone sets a new record time of > 8 seconds! Honestly, it is simply ridiculous for a side to score 400 in an ODI innings, and any "record" made on the sub continent should be null & void.... and I am an Indian!! Full credit to Sachin, but do it at the MCG or Lord's etc and REAL cricket lovers might take notice- not just the extremely simple minded stats obsessed morons. Glenn McGrath would have made 100 playing in that match! In fact Sanjay Manjrekar LAUGHED when talking about the size of the ground and just how small it was, and how flat the pitch was. Cricket (especially ODI's) in the sub continent has well & truly become a joke, and we should be embarrassed, not celebrating it.

  • Prar on March 1, 2010, 14:22 GMT

    Aakash,I don't know too much about the pure technical aspects. What I do know is that there is something immeasurably purer in Tendulkar's batsmanship than any other batsman I've ever seen. And of course what about the sheer joy and delirium only Tendulkar can bring to untold millions? Has any sportsman after Muhammad Ali raised such passions (in some persons envy) and pure unadulterated joy as Tendulkar among so many people? I seriously doubt it. So, what it is I don't know- I suppose it is a combination of technique, will, balance, class, anticipation ,poise etc etc all mixed up in an incredibly heady cocktail which is impossible to surpass.

  • vilas patil on March 1, 2010, 14:17 GMT

    no doubt Sachin is the best batsman in the world of cricket.his 200* is the best answer for people who critise him..i hope sachin makes more & more records in his future carrier.

  • alex on March 1, 2010, 13:26 GMT

    Vikas - as great a knock this 200* was, it arguably cannot be regarded as the best ever ODI innings. Considering the importance of occasion and other conditions, several other innings might surpass it. To cite a few examples, his own 134, 117*, and 138.

    What stands out in this knock is the technical perfection --- it was chanceless, almost risk-free, and almost everything came off the middle of the bat ... all this at a SR of 130+. If he had recd more strike after 43rd over, 225 was a clear possibility. Makes one think that someone can score 250 in ODI on a perfect day ... my money on Sehwag and Dilshan.

  • bobby paulk on March 1, 2010, 13:23 GMT

    its good to see sachin at his best.no one can over take him on the basis of tecnique

  • Alex on March 1, 2010, 13:14 GMT

    SRT's innings featured memorable shots against every single bowler but arguably the best shots came off Steyn & Parnell.

  • Vikas on March 1, 2010, 11:56 GMT

    To Truefan,

    The efforts by great batsmen are great, but Sachin surpassed all efforts just because I don;t think Don Bradman or Viv Richards had ever imagined to paly cricket at the age of 37 and have conquered the crown of the highest run getter in ODI's. This effort make him the best of all time, this knock by Sachin is uncompareable, so lets not compare.for every fan of his, He is GOD of cricket...just watch there's more to come from him...and we pray...for more.

    SACHIN U R IMMORTAL.

  • Truefan on March 1, 2010, 11:35 GMT

    This innings happened on 24th Feb Akash.Truly a legend.But its futile to compare Don Bradman or Viv Richards as some do..They played in different eras against different bowlers in different conditions..Happened to see a talk show in Times now..it was sickening to listen to the host trying to put his words in Ayaz Memons mouth about who is the greatest..It would be nice to recollect that Sir Issac Vivian Alexander Richards scored 189 not out & 187 not out during those days when even scoring a 100 was considered the ultimate..Instead of saying Sachin would have achieved the same in Bradmans Era ..it would be nice to think vice versa as well

  • arun on March 1, 2010, 10:15 GMT

    Well expressed article Aahash, on best cricketer in the world today and all we can talk about his masterful technique and grace with which he carries himself. Great human being as well! Vow.

  • Ashish Vijay on March 1, 2010, 9:27 GMT

    The name of that flick shot is dead flick. Only sachin can play it. Simply superb master class.

  • Anirban Nag on March 1, 2010, 8:48 GMT

    YES... HE HAS DONE IT!!!!! THE FIRST 200 in an ODI by an INDIAN, feeling proud to be an INDIAN & equally happy for sachin as he is for his country's win as he has always put that above his personal achievements & that's what makes him extra special. Hope he will do well in the 2011 WC which will be his last ODI tournament & had he not missed out so many 100s in ODIs in 2007, 6 90s in 2007 alone including 3 times 99, even 3 of the 6 90s converted into 100s & the 96* had karthik did not hit that 6 to allow sachin to get yet another 100 in ODIs, his tally of ODI 100s would have already 50 then, would have been great thing. still with 46 100s now, even if he would not reach 50 100s in ODIs, if 48 or 49 ODI 100s, would still make him extra special & all time best in ODIs with over 18000 runs @ around 45 avg!!! AMAGING STUFF.. If he gets 50 100s, it will be iceing on the cake & a perfect finish along with helping INDIA to do well in the 2011 WC (to reach semis atleast or even to the final)

  • Neil on March 1, 2010, 8:24 GMT

    Move over Don Bradman. Sachin Tendulkar is now the Greatest batsman of all time.

  • Amit on March 1, 2010, 7:59 GMT

    Isn't it amazing how Tendulkar plays his big knocks without slogging and how effortlessly he keeps the strike rate high and accelerates with minimal risks? It would feel intutive to expect a slogger, oh his lucky day would reach the pinnacle of ODI score. But tenulkar is no ordinary player with sound technique. He has made improper shot look so proper. The paddle sweep, the upper cut and few other shots he play look risk free and very productive, because he has been able to twist his body and have practiced it to make it productive. Truly amazing to see what he can do with his mind and body at his age.

  • gaurav dua on March 1, 2010, 7:13 GMT

    its just an awesome innings played by sachin,its the memories that we remember us long long time.simply sachin is the GOD of cricket.sachin plays his knocks at one of the finest attacks in the world of cricket.

  • Dr.Iyer on March 1, 2010, 6:47 GMT

    Aakash, good article mate. The Master proved Technique is basis. To me one short which stands out is the Flick off Steyn to a ball yorked outside offstump in 35 th over. SACHIN simply rocks!

  • Ananta Srinivas on March 1, 2010, 5:23 GMT

    Its also more the atttitude of the younger generation players to emulate the more successful Sachin or Sehwag. They should realize that it requires special grace to become a Sehwag or a Sachin. But with Sheer hard practice and developing the mental determination one can become a Dravid. People should realize that Dravid is a great cricketer and once the basics are right one can play all the shots in the book as Dravid has proved time and again. It is important that the coaches reiterate the focus on sound technique and strong fundamentals. In the T20 era it is tough for young cricketers to accept this fact.Even the younger indian players like the Rainas, Karthiks and the Pathans look to play more Ariel shots. Probably their strength may lie in that as of now but that will not give the required consistency and cannot give them the big hundreds on a consistent basis.

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  • Ananta Srinivas on March 1, 2010, 5:23 GMT

    Its also more the atttitude of the younger generation players to emulate the more successful Sachin or Sehwag. They should realize that it requires special grace to become a Sehwag or a Sachin. But with Sheer hard practice and developing the mental determination one can become a Dravid. People should realize that Dravid is a great cricketer and once the basics are right one can play all the shots in the book as Dravid has proved time and again. It is important that the coaches reiterate the focus on sound technique and strong fundamentals. In the T20 era it is tough for young cricketers to accept this fact.Even the younger indian players like the Rainas, Karthiks and the Pathans look to play more Ariel shots. Probably their strength may lie in that as of now but that will not give the required consistency and cannot give them the big hundreds on a consistent basis.

  • Dr.Iyer on March 1, 2010, 6:47 GMT

    Aakash, good article mate. The Master proved Technique is basis. To me one short which stands out is the Flick off Steyn to a ball yorked outside offstump in 35 th over. SACHIN simply rocks!

  • gaurav dua on March 1, 2010, 7:13 GMT

    its just an awesome innings played by sachin,its the memories that we remember us long long time.simply sachin is the GOD of cricket.sachin plays his knocks at one of the finest attacks in the world of cricket.

  • Amit on March 1, 2010, 7:59 GMT

    Isn't it amazing how Tendulkar plays his big knocks without slogging and how effortlessly he keeps the strike rate high and accelerates with minimal risks? It would feel intutive to expect a slogger, oh his lucky day would reach the pinnacle of ODI score. But tenulkar is no ordinary player with sound technique. He has made improper shot look so proper. The paddle sweep, the upper cut and few other shots he play look risk free and very productive, because he has been able to twist his body and have practiced it to make it productive. Truly amazing to see what he can do with his mind and body at his age.

  • Neil on March 1, 2010, 8:24 GMT

    Move over Don Bradman. Sachin Tendulkar is now the Greatest batsman of all time.

  • Anirban Nag on March 1, 2010, 8:48 GMT

    YES... HE HAS DONE IT!!!!! THE FIRST 200 in an ODI by an INDIAN, feeling proud to be an INDIAN & equally happy for sachin as he is for his country's win as he has always put that above his personal achievements & that's what makes him extra special. Hope he will do well in the 2011 WC which will be his last ODI tournament & had he not missed out so many 100s in ODIs in 2007, 6 90s in 2007 alone including 3 times 99, even 3 of the 6 90s converted into 100s & the 96* had karthik did not hit that 6 to allow sachin to get yet another 100 in ODIs, his tally of ODI 100s would have already 50 then, would have been great thing. still with 46 100s now, even if he would not reach 50 100s in ODIs, if 48 or 49 ODI 100s, would still make him extra special & all time best in ODIs with over 18000 runs @ around 45 avg!!! AMAGING STUFF.. If he gets 50 100s, it will be iceing on the cake & a perfect finish along with helping INDIA to do well in the 2011 WC (to reach semis atleast or even to the final)

  • Ashish Vijay on March 1, 2010, 9:27 GMT

    The name of that flick shot is dead flick. Only sachin can play it. Simply superb master class.

  • arun on March 1, 2010, 10:15 GMT

    Well expressed article Aahash, on best cricketer in the world today and all we can talk about his masterful technique and grace with which he carries himself. Great human being as well! Vow.

  • Truefan on March 1, 2010, 11:35 GMT

    This innings happened on 24th Feb Akash.Truly a legend.But its futile to compare Don Bradman or Viv Richards as some do..They played in different eras against different bowlers in different conditions..Happened to see a talk show in Times now..it was sickening to listen to the host trying to put his words in Ayaz Memons mouth about who is the greatest..It would be nice to recollect that Sir Issac Vivian Alexander Richards scored 189 not out & 187 not out during those days when even scoring a 100 was considered the ultimate..Instead of saying Sachin would have achieved the same in Bradmans Era ..it would be nice to think vice versa as well

  • Vikas on March 1, 2010, 11:56 GMT

    To Truefan,

    The efforts by great batsmen are great, but Sachin surpassed all efforts just because I don;t think Don Bradman or Viv Richards had ever imagined to paly cricket at the age of 37 and have conquered the crown of the highest run getter in ODI's. This effort make him the best of all time, this knock by Sachin is uncompareable, so lets not compare.for every fan of his, He is GOD of cricket...just watch there's more to come from him...and we pray...for more.

    SACHIN U R IMMORTAL.