2010: Summer of Pakistan July 20, 2010

Imran misses launch of renaissance

Imran Khan is a hero, a role model
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Imran Khan missed out on a big opportunity to address some important issues concerned with the future of cricket © AFP

Imran Khan is a hero, a role model. He was Pakistan's greatest captain and probably the country's greatest cricketer. He was known for attack not defence. He is a man who speaks his mind, fearless in word and deed. Last week he was inducted into the MCC Hall of Fame, and this week he had the honour of delivering the MCC's Spirit of Cricket Lecture. Today, he is off awarding degrees at Bradford University in his capacity as chancellor of the university. I wonder how he will reflect on his lecture at Lord's?

It was an opportunity to send out a powerful message, a global platform for a Pakistani voice. It was a chance to set out a grand vision, to challenge the establishment, and to provoke. Yet Imran chose defence over attack. The great captain and leader did something I least expected - he played safe.

Imran's themes were familiar, hard to disagree with, and full of entertaining anecdote. Fast bowling, his own specialty, is a dying art that needs revival. Neutral umpires, his initiative, helped restore the spirit of cricket. West Indies of the 1980s, his greatest opponents, were the greatest team in the history of cricket. When your biggest statements are that limited overs cricket is killing Test cricket and that we need more technology to support umpires, you leave your audience with the sense of an opportunity missed.

Pakistan's leading cricketer ventured no comment on his country's plight in international cricket. Nothing to address the decline in attendances at Test matches. No formula to grow cricket as a global enterprise while preserving its values. No whiff of a renaissance except a nod towards the popularity of T20 cricket. A notable lecture only for what was left unsaid.

In the absence of a visionary agenda from Imran, here are a few themes he might wish to consider when he is next invited to pontificate:

1 How to save Pakistan cricket. Tours at neutral venues are a lifeline but what needs to be done to restore Pakistan as a venue for international cricket and end its exclusion?

2 How to save cricket relations between India and Pakistan. It should be sport's biggest rivalry but it is ruled by politics.

3 How to save Test cricket. Fewer and fewer people are able to excuse themselves from work to watch Test cricket. Day-night cricket is a proposal that the ICC is sitting on. It needs to be accelerated to offer supporters a better opportunity to watch Test cricket after work. Paying spectators are the lifeblood of any sport. A full stadium under lights creates the spectacle that Test cricket deserves.

4 How to save the spirit of cricket for players. Why isn't the review system available for all international matches? Imran touched on this but didn't elaborate. A comprehensive system would increase fairness for players in the way that Imran argued neutral umpires had done. Money should not be a barrier.

5 How to save the spirit of cricket for spectators. Bad light should no longer be a reason to stop a match. We have floodlights and the competing nations need to agree to use them. Why didn't Pakistan and Australia do so, for example, at Lord's? The success of this series and this neutral venue will be heavily influenced by attendances. Surely both teams and umpires would want to do everything in their power to continue play? One reservation is that the red ball is hard to pick up under lights. The MCC has conducted a trial with a pink ball under lights, and the trial was a success. The ICC and the cricket boards have no more excuses, only a lack of vision.

6 How does cricket become a truly global sport? Is T20 the route to establishing cricket outside the Test playing nations and then gradually improving standards? How do we accelerate this process?

7 What can be done about the political divide in cricket, as exemplified by the recent row over John Howard's failed bid for the ICC vice-presidency? Shouldn't the ICC be abolished and replaced by a new governing body?

Sometimes our heroes do let us down. Here Imran left his admirers baffled.

Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/KamranAbbasi

Kamran Abbasi is an editor, writer and broadcaster. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Ijaz on August 29, 2010, 23:39 GMT

    Kamran, Imran is a human being, he cannot fight on many battle fields at one time. Give him a break if he did not fulfill your expectations.

  • Azfar Alam on August 29, 2010, 15:17 GMT

    I agree that Cricket is no longer Imran's priority and I don't think he gets the time to follow the game, so he maynot be giving a lot of thought to it. But he did make some pertinent points that ODI's should be removed. He had said a long while back that ODI's will kill fast bowling and that has come true. But when we look at the Pak Cricket Administration and some of the bizarre decisions they keep taken, he still remains the most imaginative thinker on the game.

  • Haroon on July 26, 2010, 12:22 GMT

    Kamran, I think you are asking a bit too much from Imran Khan, if anything most of the points are of ICC and its affiliate cricket boards to correct/address. I do want to comment on point 2 though, cricket in India is just great, they have a wonderful team, but what I don't get is why does Pakistan only have to worry about maintaining ties with BCCI? If they don't want to continue on in the near future or the far one then let them be, they have their own choice. How about Pakistan stand its ground for once and look the other way too. I mean have we already forgotten the humiliation of IPL? Please Kamran stop worrying about India/Pakistan cricketing ties. Just let it be. Please learn to be diplomatic, not just being a push over when it comes to India or anyone else for that matter. You normally do a great job in writing but the second point is just not up to par. Move on and play cricket with other countries. If India is not worried then neither should PCB or our writers.

  • Shabut on July 25, 2010, 23:47 GMT

    I think this criticism is somewhat missplaced. Imran has nothing to do with today's running of cricket. All the raised points should be addressed to the responsible authority (e.g. ICC and realted boards) and not to Imran Khan.

  • Tamaaz Khan on July 25, 2010, 22:14 GMT

    Quite typical of Imran I must say.

    There is a great dichotomy in his speeches in Pakistan and abroad.

    While in Pakistan it is all fire and brimstone and thumbing his nose at authority. His demeanor takes an about turn when confronted with a western audience, where is speeches are a lot more focussed on being palatable.

    Kamran, I think we often gloss over the fact that Imran's success at captaincy had more to do with his personal acceptance in the western cricketing establishment and English society in general. This same acceptance, that eluded most Pakistani cricketers, lent him legitimacy when forcing the hand of the Pakistani cricket establishment and coupled his phenomenal cricketing skills meant that he was the undisputed leader the Pakistan dressing room.

    But it is well known that the aggressive tactical mind in that Pakistani team, was Miandad.

    Imran rather was the cricketing media's poster boy for how western society can culture a boy from the badlands of Pakistan.

  • Nadeem Mirza on July 25, 2010, 13:03 GMT

    Mr Abbasi: You bring great points to the table. But please do not forger that our Khan sahab is a proud politician and you know how politicians thrive in our part of the world....

  • saiful ansari, Leesburg, VA, USA on July 23, 2010, 23:31 GMT

    Imran, Wasim, Miandad & all our Paki greats & the fans of Pakistan team can hold their heads high & be proud again... Our youngsters under Salman Butt fought hard at Headingly, and are 40 runs away from a historical win against the resilient Aussies. Only the do or die spirit of the Pakistan team can vanquish the defiance of the Australians. I will keep the congragulations for tomorrow and celebrate with Mr.Abbasi & the rest of you. This victory will wipe out the defeat we suffered when the Aussies came from behind & shocked us in Sydney & also in 20/20 World Cup. Keep pushing the accelerator BOYZ (for Azhar Ali & Umar Akmal & the rest) & do not take your eyes off the target. Victory has to be earned. Hard work & persistence pay at the end in every endeavor. Good Luck Guys.

  • desihungama on July 23, 2010, 17:01 GMT

    Please do not critisize Imran. He has paid his dues to his country. He has done everything and more in his capacity to bring Pakistan as a country out of it spredicament. It is the people of Pakistan who are at loss by not realizing a gem right amongst them but continue to seek corrupt and inept.

  • Salman Elahi on July 23, 2010, 17:00 GMT

    Imran Khan is on his way to bringing a soft revolution in Pakistan. He played the boys sport well into in his manhood and then moved on to do what great men do: change the world. It wont be long when you'll see Prime Minister Imran Khan - and Pakistan cricket and everything thats wrong with it will fix itself.

    and yes Eddy is right!

  • Omer on July 23, 2010, 5:48 GMT

    Analysis of Kamran Abasi is far from convincing. With a patriot like Imran delivering lecture at Lord's in front of former cricket greats is in itself "sending out a powerful message for pakistani voice". You can't expect the teams to come to pakistan when they are being attacked with grenades. If the cricket board is creating a new crisis everyday despite the fact that they are faced with the threat of isolation from world cricket then you can't expect a "cameo" from Imran! He did splendidly what he had to do with his cricketing career. Try producing / polishing talent like Imran, Javed Miandad, Wasim ,Waqar and try generating the enthusiasm which used to grip the streets of Pakistan in 80's when their tigers were playing and i am sure you'll get what you are asking. Thanks.

  • Ijaz on August 29, 2010, 23:39 GMT

    Kamran, Imran is a human being, he cannot fight on many battle fields at one time. Give him a break if he did not fulfill your expectations.

  • Azfar Alam on August 29, 2010, 15:17 GMT

    I agree that Cricket is no longer Imran's priority and I don't think he gets the time to follow the game, so he maynot be giving a lot of thought to it. But he did make some pertinent points that ODI's should be removed. He had said a long while back that ODI's will kill fast bowling and that has come true. But when we look at the Pak Cricket Administration and some of the bizarre decisions they keep taken, he still remains the most imaginative thinker on the game.

  • Haroon on July 26, 2010, 12:22 GMT

    Kamran, I think you are asking a bit too much from Imran Khan, if anything most of the points are of ICC and its affiliate cricket boards to correct/address. I do want to comment on point 2 though, cricket in India is just great, they have a wonderful team, but what I don't get is why does Pakistan only have to worry about maintaining ties with BCCI? If they don't want to continue on in the near future or the far one then let them be, they have their own choice. How about Pakistan stand its ground for once and look the other way too. I mean have we already forgotten the humiliation of IPL? Please Kamran stop worrying about India/Pakistan cricketing ties. Just let it be. Please learn to be diplomatic, not just being a push over when it comes to India or anyone else for that matter. You normally do a great job in writing but the second point is just not up to par. Move on and play cricket with other countries. If India is not worried then neither should PCB or our writers.

  • Shabut on July 25, 2010, 23:47 GMT

    I think this criticism is somewhat missplaced. Imran has nothing to do with today's running of cricket. All the raised points should be addressed to the responsible authority (e.g. ICC and realted boards) and not to Imran Khan.

  • Tamaaz Khan on July 25, 2010, 22:14 GMT

    Quite typical of Imran I must say.

    There is a great dichotomy in his speeches in Pakistan and abroad.

    While in Pakistan it is all fire and brimstone and thumbing his nose at authority. His demeanor takes an about turn when confronted with a western audience, where is speeches are a lot more focussed on being palatable.

    Kamran, I think we often gloss over the fact that Imran's success at captaincy had more to do with his personal acceptance in the western cricketing establishment and English society in general. This same acceptance, that eluded most Pakistani cricketers, lent him legitimacy when forcing the hand of the Pakistani cricket establishment and coupled his phenomenal cricketing skills meant that he was the undisputed leader the Pakistan dressing room.

    But it is well known that the aggressive tactical mind in that Pakistani team, was Miandad.

    Imran rather was the cricketing media's poster boy for how western society can culture a boy from the badlands of Pakistan.

  • Nadeem Mirza on July 25, 2010, 13:03 GMT

    Mr Abbasi: You bring great points to the table. But please do not forger that our Khan sahab is a proud politician and you know how politicians thrive in our part of the world....

  • saiful ansari, Leesburg, VA, USA on July 23, 2010, 23:31 GMT

    Imran, Wasim, Miandad & all our Paki greats & the fans of Pakistan team can hold their heads high & be proud again... Our youngsters under Salman Butt fought hard at Headingly, and are 40 runs away from a historical win against the resilient Aussies. Only the do or die spirit of the Pakistan team can vanquish the defiance of the Australians. I will keep the congragulations for tomorrow and celebrate with Mr.Abbasi & the rest of you. This victory will wipe out the defeat we suffered when the Aussies came from behind & shocked us in Sydney & also in 20/20 World Cup. Keep pushing the accelerator BOYZ (for Azhar Ali & Umar Akmal & the rest) & do not take your eyes off the target. Victory has to be earned. Hard work & persistence pay at the end in every endeavor. Good Luck Guys.

  • desihungama on July 23, 2010, 17:01 GMT

    Please do not critisize Imran. He has paid his dues to his country. He has done everything and more in his capacity to bring Pakistan as a country out of it spredicament. It is the people of Pakistan who are at loss by not realizing a gem right amongst them but continue to seek corrupt and inept.

  • Salman Elahi on July 23, 2010, 17:00 GMT

    Imran Khan is on his way to bringing a soft revolution in Pakistan. He played the boys sport well into in his manhood and then moved on to do what great men do: change the world. It wont be long when you'll see Prime Minister Imran Khan - and Pakistan cricket and everything thats wrong with it will fix itself.

    and yes Eddy is right!

  • Omer on July 23, 2010, 5:48 GMT

    Analysis of Kamran Abasi is far from convincing. With a patriot like Imran delivering lecture at Lord's in front of former cricket greats is in itself "sending out a powerful message for pakistani voice". You can't expect the teams to come to pakistan when they are being attacked with grenades. If the cricket board is creating a new crisis everyday despite the fact that they are faced with the threat of isolation from world cricket then you can't expect a "cameo" from Imran! He did splendidly what he had to do with his cricketing career. Try producing / polishing talent like Imran, Javed Miandad, Wasim ,Waqar and try generating the enthusiasm which used to grip the streets of Pakistan in 80's when their tigers were playing and i am sure you'll get what you are asking. Thanks.

  • allblue on July 23, 2010, 3:06 GMT

    Re day/night tests. It is easy to toss this idea into the ring as a panacea, but there is a problem - the colour of the ball. You cannot play with a red ball under lights, and when the MCC trialled the pink ball in Dubai in April the fielders reported that they could not pick it up against the dark sky. White balls have to be changed after 34 overs in ODIs for sighting reasons so there just isn't a practical solution at this time unless you are prepared to fundamentally alter the game by having a new ball every session. Also, they could not turn the lights on at Lords in the recent Test. The ground is in a residential area and the use of the lights is heavily restricted by the municipal authority. The MCC do not have the permission to use them on an ad hoc basis.

  • Rajesh Khanna on July 22, 2010, 22:42 GMT

    Imran Khan to me is a great inspiration. The man is phenominal. He beleives that nothing is impossible. I am Indian and I love this guy.

  • krishan canagasabey on July 22, 2010, 14:33 GMT

    The ICC is a governing body, just one that on longer panders to the while countries.

  • kabulkabaccha on July 22, 2010, 13:00 GMT

    Kris is spot on. That's the answer for point 2.And we all know the answer for point 1. Every kid in the subcontinent knows the answer for points 1 & 2.

  • Aniruddha on July 22, 2010, 12:20 GMT

    Kamran however sits in his plus apartment in London and comments on security situation in Pakistan. To question Imran's intent, he should atleast try to go back to Pakistan for 6 months and then comment. This article is ridiculous. Imran is a human being not anyone's genie in the bottle.

  • Aniruddha on July 22, 2010, 12:17 GMT

    Happy to see so much support pouring in for Imran. The reason Imran is still "heard" everywhere is because he doesnt go and start cribbing like everyone else. He is a man with pride and he is there as a consultant not someone constantly harping and nagging about ongoing issues.

  • Habeebi on July 22, 2010, 9:40 GMT

    Imran has done enough to Pakistan (commanded the Pakistan cricket to highest level, Built a cancer hospital, trying hard to bring Pakistan out of corrupt politicians, striving to build a university...) he is doing enough service to Pakistan as a Pakistani. Don't make Pakistan as one man army. May be Dr. Kamran has not written anything lately and wanted to write something that too with blank mind.

  • Ashok Sridharan on July 22, 2010, 6:55 GMT

    Dr. Abbasi appears to have fallen into the trap of expecting too much out of a role model. Imran was a legend who made Pakistan the force that they have been through most of the last quarter century, but expecting him to propose a solution for all ills plaguing Pakistani cricket and the game overall is asking too much.

  • kris on July 22, 2010, 6:53 GMT

    Mr. Abbasi, for your question: 2 How to save cricket relations between India and Pakistan. It should be sport's biggest rivalry but it is ruled by politics.

    The clear answer is to Pakistan stop sending terrorists to India. David Hedley(Original name,Daood Sayed Gilani) has admitted at a Federal court in USA that the ISI was handling the Mumbai 26/21 operations from start to finish. Though we respect cricketers like Imran Khan and Wasim Akram, at the end of the day we need to have mutual trust and respect. Without that there is no need to have cricket or any other sporting relation.

  • Ghufran Ahmad on July 22, 2010, 5:17 GMT

    All the issues pointed out by Kamran are already being talked about every other person. Imran is no ordinary person to repeat what everyone else is already saying. He has done enough in his playing days by stressing neutral umpires, Pakistan be given full Test series in England etc. The purpose of this addresswas different than as a Pakistani cricket representative.

  • Usama on July 22, 2010, 5:07 GMT

    This blog reads more as Kamran's wishlist rather than a critique on Imran Khan. The article was too rhetorical.

  • Nomi on July 22, 2010, 2:03 GMT

    Just do a fast rewind to 1992 and listen to Imran Khan's speech after winning the world cup. That's how much he cares about Pakistan and its people. Obviously he didn't mention anything about saving Pakistan cricket. Duh!

  • Rajesh Khanna on July 21, 2010, 21:39 GMT

    Imran Khan is awsome. I follow him closely.

  • Harsh on July 21, 2010, 19:41 GMT

    There is nothing wrong with Test Cricket or ODI or T20. Stop hyping issue that doesn't exist. There is nothing wrong with fast bowlers as well. Just prepare better pitch. Thats it. Nothing is wrong with Cricket. Nothing. 3 Test 3 ODI, no international t20. We are playing them enough domestically. Period. and yeh about Imran Khan, well Pakistan should start respecting and listening to current players and current coach. Move on. Imran Khan was great Cricketer. He is not going to be there for everyone and every-time. Deal with this reality.

  • Shahid on July 21, 2010, 17:20 GMT

    Yes some of the above points should have been touched in his speach. I think most important is a lack of cricket spirit in ICC and how a single country with the help of a couple of other greedy nations, is moulding it to her own favour. I think fast wickets will save the test formate no matter what other factors do.

  • KabulKaBaccha on July 21, 2010, 15:19 GMT

    Mate, Points 1 & 2 are out of scope. This lecture or whatsoever is not about saving Pakistan cricket. The whole world knows the answer for 1 & 2. Why do you expect Imran to comment on that? Everybody knows the answer for point 3. Reduce ticket prices, improve spectator experience & improve quality of pitches. Leave scope for fast bowlers in the subcontinent. Point 4 - What UDRS has got to do with spirit of players? Confused?? Point 5 - It's the same as point 3 and again what it's got to do with spirit of spectators. I don't understand. Point 6 - Yes,probably this is a point for discussion. Point 7 - When there is difference of opinion why do you call it as a divide. In a democratic world difference of opinion is allowed and is healthy.You have division in each and every field and between each and every country/states/counties/districts.

    And yes,Eddy is right. Spot on.

  • Hafsa on July 21, 2010, 14:38 GMT

    First of all, it was never a LECTURE, it was a sort of question answer session where these players were asked to speak on a few issues. I think you missed the part where he said that ODI should be removed from cricket to save pacers or T/20 n ODI be removed........I was thinking, how about sending you in for the next lecture! :D

  • tk109 on July 21, 2010, 13:12 GMT

    Eddy should be chairman of PCB

  • Syed. Osama on July 21, 2010, 10:36 GMT

    YEs...eddy is right

  • Aina on July 21, 2010, 6:56 GMT

    There is no call for criticizing Imran. Eddy has rightly pointed out that this was not a platform for discussing Pakistan's cricket. And it is not as if people would be prepared to follow his advice if he offered it more often than he already does. I don't see people like Ijaz Butt waiting for Imran's next comment to drastically improve Pakistan's cricket. If anything they can engineer disasters from a good team, a great bowling attack and excellent (current) coaches. The man has already served Team Pakistan more than anyone could or would. It's ridiculous to keep trying to extract more from him, and unfair. He has merely shown, as usual, that he is the only Pakistani cricketer/politician/celebrity who knows what to say and when.

  • Eddy Moses on July 21, 2010, 5:47 GMT

    I think you are being a tad unfair on Imran Khan. There is no point discussing issues such as when will visiting teams come to Pakistan - the answer is probably not in our lifetime. There is just too much going on in the country and teams will always use the security situation as a reason for not coming.

    I didn't realise that the lecture was a platform for Pakistan cricket. It wasn't and Imran, quite rightly, did not use it as such.

  • Murtaza Moiz on July 21, 2010, 4:51 GMT

    Yeah don't be so pin pointing at his lectures, because apart from Pakistan, Australia do other countries have speedsters in their lineup? or bowlers who can control speed, seem and swing aswell! Majority teams playing have their fast medium bowlers as their prime ones! So that's where he has been pointing out.

    Plus just because of monotone bowling attacks of the teams, today more matches are won on the basis of batting compared to bowling, unlike during Wasim Waqar and certain other great bowlers time when we used to see cliffhangers with bowling!

  • Saiful Ansari on July 21, 2010, 3:40 GMT

    Imran has been at best an outsider since he retired from Cricket. He has not offered his services in any form to PCB or to the local boards. With both feet in politics, I suppose he does not have time for less significant&trifle sport of Cricket, which was his passion years ago.I agree with Kamran, on this occassion he commanded the attention of ICC & the cricket playing nations. An excellent opportunity was wasted by a legend to speak in favor of getting International Cricket back to Pak, find a common ground for Pakistan&India to resume the Cricket rivalry which has been victimized by hostility, border disturbances, Kashmir dispute & Terrorism. Security is albeit of grave concern to visiting teams& local team&spectators. Pakistan can lay down a security plan, bring in international security experts to convince ICC to restore International Cricket. Pak Government can guarantee against any risk of terror attacks & provide other assurances for Cricket to return to the country.

  • Sohail Qureshi on July 20, 2010, 22:23 GMT

    I agree with Waqas there. Being a Pakistani, you would know what Imran's priorities are these days. He's not into cricket that much and a full time politician. I doubt there's anything that can be done about teams coming to Pakistan until the security situation gets any better. It would have been futile to touch that topic. Neutral venues are the way to go for now and Imran was right not to touch that. Having said that, the people of Pakistan do expect some service from him for Pakistan cricket, maybe something to bring Pakistani cricket on track, but then again that requires a lot of time...

  • Waqas Ahmed on July 20, 2010, 18:05 GMT

    Nice article Kamran but some of the points you raised are a bit unfair I think. For instance, he did talk about saving test cricket by reducing the number of t20 and one day cricket. Secondly he talked about fast bowling which used to be a real beauty of test cricket but is a rarity nowadays. You should keep in mind that Imran khan is disconnected with cricket for a long time that you can't expect him to talk about every single point you mentioned.

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  • Waqas Ahmed on July 20, 2010, 18:05 GMT

    Nice article Kamran but some of the points you raised are a bit unfair I think. For instance, he did talk about saving test cricket by reducing the number of t20 and one day cricket. Secondly he talked about fast bowling which used to be a real beauty of test cricket but is a rarity nowadays. You should keep in mind that Imran khan is disconnected with cricket for a long time that you can't expect him to talk about every single point you mentioned.

  • Sohail Qureshi on July 20, 2010, 22:23 GMT

    I agree with Waqas there. Being a Pakistani, you would know what Imran's priorities are these days. He's not into cricket that much and a full time politician. I doubt there's anything that can be done about teams coming to Pakistan until the security situation gets any better. It would have been futile to touch that topic. Neutral venues are the way to go for now and Imran was right not to touch that. Having said that, the people of Pakistan do expect some service from him for Pakistan cricket, maybe something to bring Pakistani cricket on track, but then again that requires a lot of time...

  • Saiful Ansari on July 21, 2010, 3:40 GMT

    Imran has been at best an outsider since he retired from Cricket. He has not offered his services in any form to PCB or to the local boards. With both feet in politics, I suppose he does not have time for less significant&trifle sport of Cricket, which was his passion years ago.I agree with Kamran, on this occassion he commanded the attention of ICC & the cricket playing nations. An excellent opportunity was wasted by a legend to speak in favor of getting International Cricket back to Pak, find a common ground for Pakistan&India to resume the Cricket rivalry which has been victimized by hostility, border disturbances, Kashmir dispute & Terrorism. Security is albeit of grave concern to visiting teams& local team&spectators. Pakistan can lay down a security plan, bring in international security experts to convince ICC to restore International Cricket. Pak Government can guarantee against any risk of terror attacks & provide other assurances for Cricket to return to the country.

  • Murtaza Moiz on July 21, 2010, 4:51 GMT

    Yeah don't be so pin pointing at his lectures, because apart from Pakistan, Australia do other countries have speedsters in their lineup? or bowlers who can control speed, seem and swing aswell! Majority teams playing have their fast medium bowlers as their prime ones! So that's where he has been pointing out.

    Plus just because of monotone bowling attacks of the teams, today more matches are won on the basis of batting compared to bowling, unlike during Wasim Waqar and certain other great bowlers time when we used to see cliffhangers with bowling!

  • Eddy Moses on July 21, 2010, 5:47 GMT

    I think you are being a tad unfair on Imran Khan. There is no point discussing issues such as when will visiting teams come to Pakistan - the answer is probably not in our lifetime. There is just too much going on in the country and teams will always use the security situation as a reason for not coming.

    I didn't realise that the lecture was a platform for Pakistan cricket. It wasn't and Imran, quite rightly, did not use it as such.

  • Aina on July 21, 2010, 6:56 GMT

    There is no call for criticizing Imran. Eddy has rightly pointed out that this was not a platform for discussing Pakistan's cricket. And it is not as if people would be prepared to follow his advice if he offered it more often than he already does. I don't see people like Ijaz Butt waiting for Imran's next comment to drastically improve Pakistan's cricket. If anything they can engineer disasters from a good team, a great bowling attack and excellent (current) coaches. The man has already served Team Pakistan more than anyone could or would. It's ridiculous to keep trying to extract more from him, and unfair. He has merely shown, as usual, that he is the only Pakistani cricketer/politician/celebrity who knows what to say and when.

  • Syed. Osama on July 21, 2010, 10:36 GMT

    YEs...eddy is right

  • tk109 on July 21, 2010, 13:12 GMT

    Eddy should be chairman of PCB

  • Hafsa on July 21, 2010, 14:38 GMT

    First of all, it was never a LECTURE, it was a sort of question answer session where these players were asked to speak on a few issues. I think you missed the part where he said that ODI should be removed from cricket to save pacers or T/20 n ODI be removed........I was thinking, how about sending you in for the next lecture! :D

  • KabulKaBaccha on July 21, 2010, 15:19 GMT

    Mate, Points 1 & 2 are out of scope. This lecture or whatsoever is not about saving Pakistan cricket. The whole world knows the answer for 1 & 2. Why do you expect Imran to comment on that? Everybody knows the answer for point 3. Reduce ticket prices, improve spectator experience & improve quality of pitches. Leave scope for fast bowlers in the subcontinent. Point 4 - What UDRS has got to do with spirit of players? Confused?? Point 5 - It's the same as point 3 and again what it's got to do with spirit of spectators. I don't understand. Point 6 - Yes,probably this is a point for discussion. Point 7 - When there is difference of opinion why do you call it as a divide. In a democratic world difference of opinion is allowed and is healthy.You have division in each and every field and between each and every country/states/counties/districts.

    And yes,Eddy is right. Spot on.