Indian domestic cricket November 7, 2010

Hanumangarh, India's fast-bowling factory

I'm quite fascinated with the interviews teen sensation Deepak Chahar is busy giving, one after the other
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I'm quite fascinated with the interviews teen sensation Deepak Chahar is busy giving, one after the other. People want to know what he eats, or whether he can bowl as fast as Brett Lee, or which IPL team he would like to play for. What no one seems to be asking, though, is where Deepak Chahar comes from. The answer might help us understand the events which have led to the making of the young prodigy.

It's always easy to form an opinion by just looking at the surface. Since he's a frequent sight at the NCA, and been playing age-group tournaments for quite a while, it's convenient to give credit, for once, to the otherwise much criticized system. You have to dig a little deeper to know the real story.

Chahar belongs to a district called Hanumangarh in Rajasthan. What Sansarpur is to hockey, Hanumangarh is to fast bowling. They have been producing fast bowlers by the dozen and the credit must go to one man who has dedicated himself to the craft, Navendu Tyagi. His passion for the skill compensates for the lack of infrastructure in a small district. He is a hard task master and making players physically fit is his top priority. He ensures that his wards go through a rigorous cardio routine, which, at times, includes going for a run at 2 pm in scorching desert heat. He generally accompanies them, either on foot, or on his old bike.

He also takes his pupils to a summer camp in Rishikesh every year. While the kids pay for their travelling expense, Tyagi takes care of everything else including the boarding and lodging. They stay in a basic dharamshala and the day starts at 5am with yoga. Then they run in the hills, followed by some strengthening exercises using their own body weight in the evening. It may be preferable to choose a place with modern facilities, but since that's not financially feasible, a getaway to Rishikesh during the peak summer season is the next best thing.

The coach also takes great care in preparing the practice tracks in Hanumangarh. It always has a good covering of grass and decent bounce to keep the pace men interested. Slowly but steadily his efforts have started bearing fruit - most of the fast bowlers representing Rajasthan at various age group levels now come from Hanumangarh. In fact, there are so many of them, they have started lending bowlers to other districts.

I am told that there was a time when nine out of the playing XI were fast bowlers in the district's team. Deepak would either open or bat at No. 3 for his side, which did well to improve his batting skills, but obviously meant trouble for the team. They would regularly dismiss the other side for a paltry total, but would get out for an even lower total. The district got relegated twice to be in the lowest division. Nobody, though, seems to complaining.

If one man's dedication and passion can do so much, a collective effort towards a particular goal could easily do wonders. What say?

Former India opener Aakash Chopra is the author of Out of the Blue, an account of Rajasthan's 2010-11 Ranji Trophy victory. His website is here and his Twitter feed here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • john justin on December 28, 2010, 4:05 GMT

    I have seen his(Deepak) bowling is his debut match. He swing the ball very well, but his speed is very less to get success in international matches. If he improves in his speed, surely he will he will play for India very soon. Afterall I find him a good bowler.

  • kk sharma on November 23, 2010, 2:48 GMT

    fast bowlers factory hanumaangarh.aakash bhai theek theek laga lo.kindly tell me the names of another products from that factory. deepak is a talented medium pace bowler who has the ability to swing the ball both the ways,we should be aware to whom we call fastbowler ,a fast bowler is called who can bowl more than 140km avg balls.mr.dipak is fast medium bowler. he is a natural talented bowler .but he has to learn so many delevaries like the perfect yorker,the solid bouncer,the change of pace,the slower one,use of the crease,out going balls from return crease,the ability to raise the balls from just before the good length,the wicket taking ability with the old ball,the ability to learn the track and bowl accordingly, the ability to get the cues of a batsman means what error batsman is having in his batting,the bouncer from return crease,the round the wicket effective bowling,always keeping the batsman in confussion with his stock balls and with line and length,the perfect reverse swing

  • sharath on November 21, 2010, 7:59 GMT

    it is because of coaches like this gentleman that indian cricket is unearthing such great talents,its time for BCCI to grow above sponsorship deals and ipl,and start helping people at the grassroot level

  • Ambrish on November 16, 2010, 15:05 GMT

    Agree with the comments about Hanumangarh being prematurely called a "pace factory". At the same time, it is important to encourage the likes of Coach Navendu Tyagi, especially if they consistently produce good results.

    @P Subramani:

    Rajasthan has produced a few successful medium pacers, other than Raj Singh Dungarpur. The most well-known medium pacer to come out of Rajasthan was Kailash Gattani, who was distinctly unlucky not to don India colors. In 109 matches for Rajasthan, he took 396 wickets at an average of 19.91 with 20 5-wicket hauls and 5 10-wicket hauls.

    Playing for Madhya Bharat and Rajasthan, Raj Singh Dungarpur got 206 wickets, at an average of 28.84 with 5 5-wicket hauls and 1 10-wicket haul.

    Also, G.R.Sunderam's son, Pradeep Sunderam (born in Jaipur), a right-arm medium fast bowler, was fairly successful for Rajasthan. In 40 matches, he took 145 wickets at an average of 28.78, with 11 5-wicket hauls and 3 10-wicket haul.

  • Gourab on November 13, 2010, 19:27 GMT

    It is too early to say that Deepak Chahar is a Bowling sensation.I've seen the match Live on TV,& if I'm not wrong..his fastest ball was below 135 kmph..that's simply not enough for excel in International Arena..I wish Deepak to stride forward towards a very successful career..& 1 more thing,plz keep him away for atleast 2years from this INDIAN PAISA LEAGUE..IPL,isn't it??

  • krish on November 12, 2010, 17:21 GMT

    Dear Mr.Akash, Your skill of looking at important and basic things which contributed to the success stories of people is really great. This is another example. The icing on the cake is your flowing style of analysis and description. Keep it up.

  • Manish on November 12, 2010, 9:30 GMT

    Aakash chopra was a good cricketer.but lndian team needed best cricketer TO BRINg succes

  • P Subramani on November 12, 2010, 4:55 GMT

    Hanumangarh on the India Pakistan border cannot be put on par with Sansarpur near Jullundur in regard to producing stars in a particular type of sport. Sansarpur is part of hockey folklore because some of our greatest hockey players at least when India was on top in hockey, were from this place. Located close to Jullundur Cantonment, it is a village where there is a traditional flavour for hockey. If Hanumangarh is indeed such place for producing fast bowlers then India will be well served. The point is in the past which are the big names from this place. In fact from Rajasthan itself, I can remember only the late Raj Singh Dungarpur as a purveyor of pace bowling. G R Sunderam too used to represent Rajasthan at one point in time but he was actually from erstwhile Bombay.

  • Yasir Hasan on November 11, 2010, 6:43 GMT

    Fast bowler from India...really... :-p.... I think India has raised quite a few potentially good bowlers in last 5-10 years... but the problem lies either with too much attention, or lack of mentors, I can't say for sure. Their potential never materialize and after huge hype they are sidelined for good.

  • chennaicric on November 10, 2010, 13:31 GMT

    In western countries winter months are so cold that they need indoor gyms and excercise machines to prepare their bodies for fast bowling and other sporting activities. India with its lovely weather all year round outdoor activties are natural ways to training ones body. Running will improve stamina.Our age old YOGA is ideal to strengthen body and mind. Push ups and other aerobics will strenthen different groups of muscles. Well done Mr.Tyagi. Who needs all these artificial so called modern equipments?

  • john justin on December 28, 2010, 4:05 GMT

    I have seen his(Deepak) bowling is his debut match. He swing the ball very well, but his speed is very less to get success in international matches. If he improves in his speed, surely he will he will play for India very soon. Afterall I find him a good bowler.

  • kk sharma on November 23, 2010, 2:48 GMT

    fast bowlers factory hanumaangarh.aakash bhai theek theek laga lo.kindly tell me the names of another products from that factory. deepak is a talented medium pace bowler who has the ability to swing the ball both the ways,we should be aware to whom we call fastbowler ,a fast bowler is called who can bowl more than 140km avg balls.mr.dipak is fast medium bowler. he is a natural talented bowler .but he has to learn so many delevaries like the perfect yorker,the solid bouncer,the change of pace,the slower one,use of the crease,out going balls from return crease,the ability to raise the balls from just before the good length,the wicket taking ability with the old ball,the ability to learn the track and bowl accordingly, the ability to get the cues of a batsman means what error batsman is having in his batting,the bouncer from return crease,the round the wicket effective bowling,always keeping the batsman in confussion with his stock balls and with line and length,the perfect reverse swing

  • sharath on November 21, 2010, 7:59 GMT

    it is because of coaches like this gentleman that indian cricket is unearthing such great talents,its time for BCCI to grow above sponsorship deals and ipl,and start helping people at the grassroot level

  • Ambrish on November 16, 2010, 15:05 GMT

    Agree with the comments about Hanumangarh being prematurely called a "pace factory". At the same time, it is important to encourage the likes of Coach Navendu Tyagi, especially if they consistently produce good results.

    @P Subramani:

    Rajasthan has produced a few successful medium pacers, other than Raj Singh Dungarpur. The most well-known medium pacer to come out of Rajasthan was Kailash Gattani, who was distinctly unlucky not to don India colors. In 109 matches for Rajasthan, he took 396 wickets at an average of 19.91 with 20 5-wicket hauls and 5 10-wicket hauls.

    Playing for Madhya Bharat and Rajasthan, Raj Singh Dungarpur got 206 wickets, at an average of 28.84 with 5 5-wicket hauls and 1 10-wicket haul.

    Also, G.R.Sunderam's son, Pradeep Sunderam (born in Jaipur), a right-arm medium fast bowler, was fairly successful for Rajasthan. In 40 matches, he took 145 wickets at an average of 28.78, with 11 5-wicket hauls and 3 10-wicket haul.

  • Gourab on November 13, 2010, 19:27 GMT

    It is too early to say that Deepak Chahar is a Bowling sensation.I've seen the match Live on TV,& if I'm not wrong..his fastest ball was below 135 kmph..that's simply not enough for excel in International Arena..I wish Deepak to stride forward towards a very successful career..& 1 more thing,plz keep him away for atleast 2years from this INDIAN PAISA LEAGUE..IPL,isn't it??

  • krish on November 12, 2010, 17:21 GMT

    Dear Mr.Akash, Your skill of looking at important and basic things which contributed to the success stories of people is really great. This is another example. The icing on the cake is your flowing style of analysis and description. Keep it up.

  • Manish on November 12, 2010, 9:30 GMT

    Aakash chopra was a good cricketer.but lndian team needed best cricketer TO BRINg succes

  • P Subramani on November 12, 2010, 4:55 GMT

    Hanumangarh on the India Pakistan border cannot be put on par with Sansarpur near Jullundur in regard to producing stars in a particular type of sport. Sansarpur is part of hockey folklore because some of our greatest hockey players at least when India was on top in hockey, were from this place. Located close to Jullundur Cantonment, it is a village where there is a traditional flavour for hockey. If Hanumangarh is indeed such place for producing fast bowlers then India will be well served. The point is in the past which are the big names from this place. In fact from Rajasthan itself, I can remember only the late Raj Singh Dungarpur as a purveyor of pace bowling. G R Sunderam too used to represent Rajasthan at one point in time but he was actually from erstwhile Bombay.

  • Yasir Hasan on November 11, 2010, 6:43 GMT

    Fast bowler from India...really... :-p.... I think India has raised quite a few potentially good bowlers in last 5-10 years... but the problem lies either with too much attention, or lack of mentors, I can't say for sure. Their potential never materialize and after huge hype they are sidelined for good.

  • chennaicric on November 10, 2010, 13:31 GMT

    In western countries winter months are so cold that they need indoor gyms and excercise machines to prepare their bodies for fast bowling and other sporting activities. India with its lovely weather all year round outdoor activties are natural ways to training ones body. Running will improve stamina.Our age old YOGA is ideal to strengthen body and mind. Push ups and other aerobics will strenthen different groups of muscles. Well done Mr.Tyagi. Who needs all these artificial so called modern equipments?

  • HotShot on November 9, 2010, 17:55 GMT

    Whoever said Indian doesn't have fast bowlers, Sameera? We do have bowlers in the domestic circuit bowling in the mid to high 140s, but they are not nurtured. They are given an odd chance and left into the wilderness. India needs a definite programme to nurture and groom them and help they grow. Umesh Yadav is one. He bowls at a lively pace, touching 150 regularly, and is easily the fastest in the land.

    Milind Rege, has a good opinion of him.

  • harsh on November 9, 2010, 15:17 GMT

    I agree with very few who commented. The kid had played will in one match and that too on a very weak team called HYD. I don't see any sensation here, specially Akash failed to give me one another fast bowler from this so called fast bowler factory. :)

  • Sanjay on November 9, 2010, 13:37 GMT

    Akash,

    Many congratulations firstly for making a smooth transition from International & first class cricket and joining the ranks of the fourth estate. I always enjoy your writing as I did your dour partnership with Sehwag on that excellent tour down-under. It is good that people in the background are given their due. More often than not the elite, hob knob all the attention. We seriously need some fast bowlers to step in and take over from the Khans & the Nehras of the world. Keep up the good work.

  • vaibhav on November 9, 2010, 11:29 GMT

    How many "fast" bowlers has he produced? Do they actually bowl at 140+ or 150+ for one full test match session?

  • Vijayendra on November 9, 2010, 10:27 GMT

    By Akash's standard a very below par article. Akash just couldn't decide if he wanted to write about Hanumangarh the so-called fast bowling factory, Navendu Tyagi the coach without system support, or Deepak Chahar the so-called fast bowling senstion who has played only 1 FC Match.

  • Mukunda on November 9, 2010, 10:16 GMT

    Akash, your articles are honest and beautiful. I am sure one day you will get pulitzer. Your innate humanity in recognising people whom others dont even acknowledge make your even better human being.

    thank you for your articles. please continue to enlighten us.

  • Joydeep Das on November 9, 2010, 9:47 GMT

    Incredible....thanks to the author for the article....for mentioning this coach cum mentor for fast bowlers...I hope people can spread the word on sites like Orkut and Facebook and make the board wake up and aid Navendu Tyagi financially!

  • Urooj Khan, KSA on November 9, 2010, 9:04 GMT

    It's good to appreciate, but, to a limited extent, we have seen him bowl/perform only once, we need to see if he will be consistant. I have seen his clip of wickets of his debut match, the swing is extremely good, 1 wkt, he bowled outside off, and took the leg stump. But again, I feel he lacks in pace, which is very important for success in Int'l arena. In our domestic circuit, the pace bowlers bowl, at a maximum of 130 kms, and most of the time 120 to 123 kms. If our batsmen perform on such attack, how come, we expect them to counter the foreign pace attack comfortably. We are fortuante to have batsmen like Rohit, Raina, in youngsters, but, should work on getting quality fast bowlers, that would work for both departmetns, if a batsmen perform on good pace attack, he would not be surprised facing Brett lee or any other pacer. In fact, I feel, if a bowler bowls less than at least 135 kms/hr. he should not be allowed to bowl new ball. Anyways, Best of luch to the young chap. Thnx

  • nitish rawat on November 9, 2010, 5:30 GMT

    u are right sir its good for our country as we are already been struggling through our pace attack .

  • Vinod Pathiyal on November 9, 2010, 5:12 GMT

    Akash, great insight. Thanks for the article (millionth time)

  • sameera on November 9, 2010, 3:17 GMT

    who said that he can bowl fast as Brett lee or someone like that..he is another medium pacer like praveen kumar.india haven't got "fast" bowlers.they only got medium pacers.there fast bowlers are the bowlers who can bowl 120-130 or so.

  • uttam choudhary on November 8, 2010, 23:49 GMT

    Aakash,

    I never knew about your writing skills...too good man!!

  • jitendra on November 8, 2010, 20:18 GMT

    Some people are furious because they have never heard of Hanumangarh !!!! go and visit Hanumangarh and nearby villages and check the passion for the game. sooner or later you would see great players emerging from there . they need only one spark. wait till chahar plays for India, you will see many fast bowlers emerging from this small town bordering Pakistan. Remember... Not every talented player gets to play for India. there was a time (till 1980's)when this place was hot spot for football and hockey in Rajasthan.

  • CricFan on November 8, 2010, 18:56 GMT

    This goes on to show that BCCI is not doing enough to breed more fast bowlers. They are just happy with creating series afer series to keep minting money. Shame on them. No respect or love for the game.

  • Kishan Kumar on November 8, 2010, 16:11 GMT

    Great article Aakash and thanks a lot for bringing such stories out. I just hope somebody @ BCCI is reading this. As suggested by Ashok, I hope such talent is also taught how to handle (early) success.More importantly, hats off to Mr Tyagi for the perseverance and vision.

  • bibek patra,bhubaneswar on November 8, 2010, 16:06 GMT

    yes i do agree with your opinion that a collective effort from at least at the district level can do a great job.

  • balaji on November 8, 2010, 14:43 GMT

    nice subject for an article. Thanks for bringing to our notice the hard work put in by real people purely out of passion for the game. Keep up the good work.

  • pradeep on November 8, 2010, 13:44 GMT

    the kind of country that we r are i doubt if Mr Tyagi gets any award for his efforts.but he will get good wishes and blessings in plenty (which isnt too bad either).

  • Srini on November 8, 2010, 13:31 GMT

    Aakash, thank you for bringing to light the dedication and passion that this coach has for fast bowling. Hopefully, BCCI will take note of his achievements and set up proper facilities as well as provide financial support to run his various programs.

    NCI or MRF need not be the only places in the country to nurture fast bowling talent.

  • mashood on November 8, 2010, 12:02 GMT

    Are you guys serious! I am sorry but I can't understand you, he has played a sum of 1 FC game, hardly enough to be classified as a 'sensation'. This reminds me distinctly of the Atul Sharma episode, well at least he actually plays.

  • Sam Sam on November 8, 2010, 11:15 GMT

    After reading your article, I researched the kid. According to most articles on him he's a medium pacer and not a genuine fast bowler. And according to him, it had rained the previous night and that morning as well and the ball was swinging like anything. A true test of his bowling will be when the conditions don't suit the bowlers.

  • Biju on November 8, 2010, 11:03 GMT

    Why don't this BCCI give chance to Deepak Chahar.Remember the old saying ' Strike the iron when its hot'. He will be India's answer to Mohammed Amir of pakistan, Wayne Parnell of South Africa. There is none expect Zaheer Khan that has the potential to make inroads into best batter's of the world. So give a chance to him let him prove what can he do.

  • Anonymous on November 8, 2010, 11:02 GMT

    Why dont this BCCI give chance to Deepak Chahar.Remember the old saying ' Strike the iron when its hot'. He will be Indias answer to Mohammed Amir of pakistan, Wayne Parnell of South Africa. There is none expect Zaheer Khan that has the potential to make inroads into best batters of the world. So give a chance to him let him prove what can he do.

  • Himadri Sekhar Roy on November 8, 2010, 9:31 GMT

    Thanks Akash for sharing with us this story. One just hopes that Deepak doesn't loose focus. He will have a great future.

  • bongo on November 8, 2010, 9:08 GMT

    Akash, Chaher may or may not be a good bowler in the making. Mr Tyagi may or may not be doing a good job. The data that you have presented is not adequate for any prediction. From all available descriptions, Chaher is a medium pacer who (going by Indian trends) would be becoming even slower over the years- hence not exactly a fast bowler. You would also have done well to name at least one other bowler who has come from these stables (before terming it as a fast bowling factory)

  • jitendra on November 8, 2010, 8:31 GMT

    Hanumangarh , off late , has given great football, hockey players to Rajasthan. But this time its cricket. As a kid I saw Navendu Tyagi , Nalin Jain practicing at the PG college ground several times and belive me Hanumangarh had faster bowlers than Deepak Chahar that time and even today. you need to visit the various cricket tournament played yearly , at villege level, in Kolha or KIishangarg, suryawali etc.

  • kundan kumar on November 8, 2010, 6:39 GMT

    at first thanks to Navendu Tyagi sir, for his effort to producing a high quality fast bowler. and another thanks to you mr akash chopra. all man have a fire but he is like hanuman (god). who does not know how many power i have. so a good coach and a good political leader always vibrate men's power to doing best.

  • sups on November 8, 2010, 6:37 GMT

    Aakash, many thanks to you for highlighting jewels from the never-explored backyard of Indian cricket. We Indians have been perennial 'grass is greener on the other side' type of people. We yearn for latest gyms and other modern facilities that boys in England or Australia have, but we forget that while our system cannot provide them all the time, there are alternate methods to harness your skills. People like Navendu should be given more publicity to promote his down-to-earth, diligent and effective coaching methods. One can complain as much as he wants, but to move ahead with what you have at your disposal is what real coaching is all about. Coaching is not about wearing suave glasses and handing out charts to players in a state-of-the-art facility. Being involved with players, showing solidarity and understanding, and igniting the passion of the game in them through your own is what sets the path for youngsters. I admire Navendu and I wish him all the very best in his endeavours.

  • Ashok on November 8, 2010, 6:04 GMT

    Nice article Mr. Chopra - the best columnists are good reporters too and glad to see you getting there. I worry at the thought of what the IPL can do to Chahar if he plays now. Can we somehow make him wait a season before he joins?(that way he will have two Ranji seasons before stepping into IPL.) Maybe BCCI can buyout anything that is offered to him by an IPL team. But wait, that calls for foresight which is just a little bit beyond them.

  • Sameer on November 8, 2010, 5:23 GMT

    bravo! aakash chopra,everybody digs in and presents a heart rendering story of a athlete who achieves stardom. the credit is usually given to the star himself. infact the whole tenor of the writing is more like a bollywood script. thank you for bringing to forefront the unseen face, who is really making a hell of a difference.

  • Anonymous on November 8, 2010, 5:02 GMT

    All this with no mention of BCCI, State association. What a slap on the faces of these so called developers of cricket..

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  • Anonymous on November 8, 2010, 5:02 GMT

    All this with no mention of BCCI, State association. What a slap on the faces of these so called developers of cricket..

  • Sameer on November 8, 2010, 5:23 GMT

    bravo! aakash chopra,everybody digs in and presents a heart rendering story of a athlete who achieves stardom. the credit is usually given to the star himself. infact the whole tenor of the writing is more like a bollywood script. thank you for bringing to forefront the unseen face, who is really making a hell of a difference.

  • Ashok on November 8, 2010, 6:04 GMT

    Nice article Mr. Chopra - the best columnists are good reporters too and glad to see you getting there. I worry at the thought of what the IPL can do to Chahar if he plays now. Can we somehow make him wait a season before he joins?(that way he will have two Ranji seasons before stepping into IPL.) Maybe BCCI can buyout anything that is offered to him by an IPL team. But wait, that calls for foresight which is just a little bit beyond them.

  • sups on November 8, 2010, 6:37 GMT

    Aakash, many thanks to you for highlighting jewels from the never-explored backyard of Indian cricket. We Indians have been perennial 'grass is greener on the other side' type of people. We yearn for latest gyms and other modern facilities that boys in England or Australia have, but we forget that while our system cannot provide them all the time, there are alternate methods to harness your skills. People like Navendu should be given more publicity to promote his down-to-earth, diligent and effective coaching methods. One can complain as much as he wants, but to move ahead with what you have at your disposal is what real coaching is all about. Coaching is not about wearing suave glasses and handing out charts to players in a state-of-the-art facility. Being involved with players, showing solidarity and understanding, and igniting the passion of the game in them through your own is what sets the path for youngsters. I admire Navendu and I wish him all the very best in his endeavours.

  • kundan kumar on November 8, 2010, 6:39 GMT

    at first thanks to Navendu Tyagi sir, for his effort to producing a high quality fast bowler. and another thanks to you mr akash chopra. all man have a fire but he is like hanuman (god). who does not know how many power i have. so a good coach and a good political leader always vibrate men's power to doing best.

  • jitendra on November 8, 2010, 8:31 GMT

    Hanumangarh , off late , has given great football, hockey players to Rajasthan. But this time its cricket. As a kid I saw Navendu Tyagi , Nalin Jain practicing at the PG college ground several times and belive me Hanumangarh had faster bowlers than Deepak Chahar that time and even today. you need to visit the various cricket tournament played yearly , at villege level, in Kolha or KIishangarg, suryawali etc.

  • bongo on November 8, 2010, 9:08 GMT

    Akash, Chaher may or may not be a good bowler in the making. Mr Tyagi may or may not be doing a good job. The data that you have presented is not adequate for any prediction. From all available descriptions, Chaher is a medium pacer who (going by Indian trends) would be becoming even slower over the years- hence not exactly a fast bowler. You would also have done well to name at least one other bowler who has come from these stables (before terming it as a fast bowling factory)

  • Himadri Sekhar Roy on November 8, 2010, 9:31 GMT

    Thanks Akash for sharing with us this story. One just hopes that Deepak doesn't loose focus. He will have a great future.

  • Anonymous on November 8, 2010, 11:02 GMT

    Why dont this BCCI give chance to Deepak Chahar.Remember the old saying ' Strike the iron when its hot'. He will be Indias answer to Mohammed Amir of pakistan, Wayne Parnell of South Africa. There is none expect Zaheer Khan that has the potential to make inroads into best batters of the world. So give a chance to him let him prove what can he do.

  • Biju on November 8, 2010, 11:03 GMT

    Why don't this BCCI give chance to Deepak Chahar.Remember the old saying ' Strike the iron when its hot'. He will be India's answer to Mohammed Amir of pakistan, Wayne Parnell of South Africa. There is none expect Zaheer Khan that has the potential to make inroads into best batter's of the world. So give a chance to him let him prove what can he do.