Fallout of the Lahore attack March 4, 2009

Lahore casts IPL shadow in New Zealand

36

Top Curve
Fletcher warns against playing in India
  • Duncan Fletcher has cautioned England's players against playing the IPL, saying some types of terrorist attacks can be carried out more easily in India than Pakistan.
  • "The traffic is often so bad in the big [Indian] cities where a lot of the cricket is played that the coach can move along only slowly at times, which turns it into a sitting duck for terrorists," he wrote in his Guardian column. "There's nothing stopping a tuk-tuk pulling up alongside and detonating a bomb.
  • "If I were one of the England guys who signed up for the IPL, I would be concerned." Several leading England players, including Kevin Pietersen and Andrew Flintoff, have signed lucrative contracts to play in this season's IPL, which is scheduled to start next month.
Bottom Curve

Tuesday's terror attack on the Sri Lankan team in Lahore has led to a heightened anxiety among the New Zealand players over touring India for next month's IPL, with eight players expected to feature in the tournament which runs from April 10-May 24. Their concerns over playing in India existed, it turns out, even before last night's incident.

New Zealand allrounder Jacob Oram said the events in Pakistan have only worsened the state. "Definitely after what happened in Mumbai late last year, and what happened last night, it keeps raising questions," said Oram, who is part of the Chennai Super Kings squad in the IPL along with Stephen Fleming.

"Before that I wouldn't have had any worries. Now, though, questions have got to be asked. Heath Mills [the New Zealand Cricket Players' Association chief] and the Federation of International Cricketers' Associations [FICA] are looking into security measures. Last year the IPL was amazing, with all the fanfare, but now reality has hit hard."

Heath Mills told Cricinfo that the New Zealand players were more concerned about the security measures and that he had received calls from a couple of them even before the Lahore attack, enquiring about the security arrangements in the IPL.

"Our players don't have any direct dealings with the BCCI or the IPL," Mills said. "The most important thing right now would be for the BCCI and IPL to deal with players directly, and also with FICA. That will give them a reassurance about the security situation."

FICA and the NZCPA are likely to play an important role in any decision regarding the IPL. Although the NZCPA and New Zealand Cricket (NZC) can only make recommendations, it is unlikely the players will take individual calls.

"We back our player association and NZC to make the decision," Oram said. "NZC have been great so far whenever we have toured dicey countries. They have left it up to players. That decision is made with friends and family and wives in mind. Until a tour like that comes around, I wouldn't be sticking my neck out. But I will be thinking twice."

He said it was a relief, though, that NZC was looking into the Pakistan tour - scheduled for later this year. "That takes a decision out of a player's hand," he said. "That's always tough when an individual has to take his decision. So you can see which individual has said yes or no, and it can isolate guys and set them aside from others. For NZC to say no straightaway, with the backing of NZCPA, puts us out of focus.

"The IPL has definitely opened financial doors that you can only dream of. But I am married now. It would take a lot for me to turn a blind eye to what's going on. I know the player associations around the world are looking into the security arrangement. I read that Lalit Modi had got the security beefed up. If that's the case, and if I am assured about the security, I won't say no just yet. If it gets worse, you have got to take a look at it."

Aaron Klee, Jesse Ryder's manager, said though touring India was not quite the same as touring Pakistan, there were a few concerns about the batsman turning out for the Bangalore Royal Challengers.

"I haven't spoken to Jesse as yet, but for me personally, I am pretty relaxed at this moment," Klee said. "But I wouldn't be just jumping on the plane to India since I will be sitting with the players' association people and the New Zealand Cricket officials to understand the scene better."

Sidharth Monga is a staff writer at Cricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • promal on March 5, 2009, 14:18 GMT

    Responding to unkith and sasidharp, your points are well-taken but I still don't think what I have said is silly. The Mexico-America hypothesis was just an example. If Mexico happened to be a hot-bed of al-Qaeda or America-haters, I can guarantee that terror strikes on soft targets in America would be as common as those in India. The same theory holds for any neighbouring pairs of countries (did Madrid bombings affect sport in France? Did London bombings stop the Ashes?) To say that the US hasn't had a terror strike after 9/11 is also invalid because they never had one before that either. Comparing defence budgets is meaningless; India spends a huge proportion of its budget allocation on defence and I'd rather we didn't. My main point was that if India says it will give its maximum security to the players and they do, but the players still refuse to come, then it is akin to subconscious racism and a convenient clubbing of neighbours, something that wouldn't be done with western nations

  • cricpolitics on March 5, 2009, 14:09 GMT

    Typical Indian writer and mentality Mr. Sridath Monga. Your sheer bias is so abvious. You let the comments appear when Indians mention Pakistan as terrorist but how conveniently you filter out comments which show the ugly side of India. You won't be able to keep your eyes closed for very long and misguide rest of the world. The reality is that India has homegrown terrorists and they strike targets very frequently. Indian security forces have failed miserably every time.

  • popcorn on March 5, 2009, 9:30 GMT

    Any armchair discussion on whether IPL should go on should address one question: Will you,as a common man, risk your life to watch a cricket match in a Stadium or would you prefer to watch it on TV in the safety of your home? Why talk of security for the players and officials alone? Hasn't the common man in India been the victim of terror attacks?Jaipur,Mumbai,Bangalore,Hyderabad,etc.etc. It's all about money,honey. So if the IPL must go on, players and officials should be the only ones participating in the stadium under heavy security - like the India Sri Lanka match at Eden Grdens,some years ago. Television income,Advertisement income,Player income,Franchisee income will all be tken care of. We know that IPL does not expect to generate the millions of dollars from Gate money, so if IPL must go on, play to empty stands, and it will still be viable!

  • unkith on March 5, 2009, 6:32 GMT

    Dear Promal, I am Indian too and I share your angst and bewilderment in the likeness issue of Pak and India vis-a-vis security. However I think your Mexico v/s USA example is inaccurate. You really cannot compare the levels of self reconnaissance existent in the USA post 9/11 to ours. Nor can we compare the efficiency of the local police in India and the SWAT teams in the USA. And let's not even get down to the weapons comparisons between these two countries. Suffice it to say that the US spends over 800 Billion per year on defense and last year we spent close to 25. Then there's also the fact that post 9/11 there hasn't been a single terrorist attack on the USA. And whether we like it or not, you really cannot compare the safety in the lifestyle of 1st world countries to ours. In the end though, it has to be said that security will be tighter in India as compared to Pak because of the sheer difference in the comparative volumes of the security forces in the two countries.

  • addsmiles on March 5, 2009, 5:21 GMT

    India and Pak are two different worlds, period. However given the kind of attention the Lahore attack garnered, I have absolutely no doubt that somebody somewhere is already planning his next attack during IPL on the cricketing fraternity. We have to admit even with all the security it is improbable but not impossible. It is very much understandable that some will refuse to participate and they are justified in doing so. However, IPL should and will go on, not playing will be akin to giving the terrorists what they want. Leave no stone unturned in making sure that the security measures are more than adequate because it's not just cricket anymore, its now also a question of national pride.

  • sasidharp on March 5, 2009, 4:30 GMT

    @promal

    "But if there's a blast in Lahore, why should that reignite talks of security concerns in India?"

    I'm Indian and I can see quite obviously that your argument is extremely silly. There are many reasons why this should "reignite talks"

    1) Cricketers were attacked for the first time - so that changes the picture. In Mumbai, only foreigners were attacked -- what's the guarantee that this time foreign cricketers aren't attacked?

    2) Same terrorists - Pakistani terrorists crossed the border for the Mumbai incident. So it makes sense that if they attacked cricketers in Pakistan, it's not too hard for them to cross the border and attack any one of many places where IPL is being conducted.

    3) Raises general doubt about priorities in life and risk vs reward - this attack on cricketers puts everything in a new perspective, in general, about what one's priorities are and how to weigh risk vs reward.

  • promal on March 5, 2009, 2:25 GMT

    What always amazes me is how India and Pakistan are always clubbed into the "same thing". That is the most flabbergasting aspect of all these concerns/comments. Sure we know that attacks happen in India almost at will, with 2008 being a particularly bad year (Jaipur, Delhi, Bangalore, Ahmedabad, Guwahati and then culminating in Mumbai) and so if then people feel they don't want to come, fine. But if there's a blast in Lahore, why should that reignite talks of security concerns in India? That's quite unfair. I.e. if Lahore hadn't happened, would we still be talking of cancelling IPL? I'm guessing not! Hypothetically, if there was an attack in Mexico City, would people still have issues of going to America to play sport? I think not. I think there are two problems here: 1) neighbouring 3rd world countries are often seen as the same thing by first world-citizen countries and 2) most cricketing nations are islands and so they don't know what it means to have a hostile and unsafe neighbour.

  • allstars_XI on March 5, 2009, 1:24 GMT

    We must admit that terrorism is becoming a problm in the subcontinent. So I would say that it is unsafe for players to play in India and Pakistan. Just imagine if something was to happen while the players attend the IPL. Then we would be facing a situation that Pakistan is facing right now. So I would say that for the time being, players shouldn't be visiting India.

  • mmene on March 4, 2009, 23:13 GMT

    I don't see why people are so defensive about people being nervous about playing in IPL. Do you think if the LeT is willing to kill cricketers in Pakistan they will have objections to doing it in India? It should be the opposite - we should be worried about the Indian cricketers who are playing in IPL. These are blood thirsty killers whose sole goal is to get the maximum publicity at any human cost. And the cheapest and easiest publicity comes from attacking visible public targets. They attacked the Sri Lankans who were trying to do a favor to Pakistan by playing there. They will probably kill their own fathers and mothers to get newspaper headlines. Why would they not try to attack Indias most internationally visible sporting event? Think about it - as much as you don't want it to happen we have to be alert to the monster next door who might just do anything. Hiding from the risk is not the answer. And no one should blame international cricketers for being worried about their lives.

  • waheed on March 4, 2009, 21:18 GMT

    I think this time no country is safe even in India mumbai Attacks in Bangladesh that army incident and in sri lanka tamil scenario so dont blame any country or anyone for these conditions I think we should stand together against these kind of situations these terrorists dont have any nationality religion or name they are just enemies of PEACE...

  • promal on March 5, 2009, 14:18 GMT

    Responding to unkith and sasidharp, your points are well-taken but I still don't think what I have said is silly. The Mexico-America hypothesis was just an example. If Mexico happened to be a hot-bed of al-Qaeda or America-haters, I can guarantee that terror strikes on soft targets in America would be as common as those in India. The same theory holds for any neighbouring pairs of countries (did Madrid bombings affect sport in France? Did London bombings stop the Ashes?) To say that the US hasn't had a terror strike after 9/11 is also invalid because they never had one before that either. Comparing defence budgets is meaningless; India spends a huge proportion of its budget allocation on defence and I'd rather we didn't. My main point was that if India says it will give its maximum security to the players and they do, but the players still refuse to come, then it is akin to subconscious racism and a convenient clubbing of neighbours, something that wouldn't be done with western nations

  • cricpolitics on March 5, 2009, 14:09 GMT

    Typical Indian writer and mentality Mr. Sridath Monga. Your sheer bias is so abvious. You let the comments appear when Indians mention Pakistan as terrorist but how conveniently you filter out comments which show the ugly side of India. You won't be able to keep your eyes closed for very long and misguide rest of the world. The reality is that India has homegrown terrorists and they strike targets very frequently. Indian security forces have failed miserably every time.

  • popcorn on March 5, 2009, 9:30 GMT

    Any armchair discussion on whether IPL should go on should address one question: Will you,as a common man, risk your life to watch a cricket match in a Stadium or would you prefer to watch it on TV in the safety of your home? Why talk of security for the players and officials alone? Hasn't the common man in India been the victim of terror attacks?Jaipur,Mumbai,Bangalore,Hyderabad,etc.etc. It's all about money,honey. So if the IPL must go on, players and officials should be the only ones participating in the stadium under heavy security - like the India Sri Lanka match at Eden Grdens,some years ago. Television income,Advertisement income,Player income,Franchisee income will all be tken care of. We know that IPL does not expect to generate the millions of dollars from Gate money, so if IPL must go on, play to empty stands, and it will still be viable!

  • unkith on March 5, 2009, 6:32 GMT

    Dear Promal, I am Indian too and I share your angst and bewilderment in the likeness issue of Pak and India vis-a-vis security. However I think your Mexico v/s USA example is inaccurate. You really cannot compare the levels of self reconnaissance existent in the USA post 9/11 to ours. Nor can we compare the efficiency of the local police in India and the SWAT teams in the USA. And let's not even get down to the weapons comparisons between these two countries. Suffice it to say that the US spends over 800 Billion per year on defense and last year we spent close to 25. Then there's also the fact that post 9/11 there hasn't been a single terrorist attack on the USA. And whether we like it or not, you really cannot compare the safety in the lifestyle of 1st world countries to ours. In the end though, it has to be said that security will be tighter in India as compared to Pak because of the sheer difference in the comparative volumes of the security forces in the two countries.

  • addsmiles on March 5, 2009, 5:21 GMT

    India and Pak are two different worlds, period. However given the kind of attention the Lahore attack garnered, I have absolutely no doubt that somebody somewhere is already planning his next attack during IPL on the cricketing fraternity. We have to admit even with all the security it is improbable but not impossible. It is very much understandable that some will refuse to participate and they are justified in doing so. However, IPL should and will go on, not playing will be akin to giving the terrorists what they want. Leave no stone unturned in making sure that the security measures are more than adequate because it's not just cricket anymore, its now also a question of national pride.

  • sasidharp on March 5, 2009, 4:30 GMT

    @promal

    "But if there's a blast in Lahore, why should that reignite talks of security concerns in India?"

    I'm Indian and I can see quite obviously that your argument is extremely silly. There are many reasons why this should "reignite talks"

    1) Cricketers were attacked for the first time - so that changes the picture. In Mumbai, only foreigners were attacked -- what's the guarantee that this time foreign cricketers aren't attacked?

    2) Same terrorists - Pakistani terrorists crossed the border for the Mumbai incident. So it makes sense that if they attacked cricketers in Pakistan, it's not too hard for them to cross the border and attack any one of many places where IPL is being conducted.

    3) Raises general doubt about priorities in life and risk vs reward - this attack on cricketers puts everything in a new perspective, in general, about what one's priorities are and how to weigh risk vs reward.

  • promal on March 5, 2009, 2:25 GMT

    What always amazes me is how India and Pakistan are always clubbed into the "same thing". That is the most flabbergasting aspect of all these concerns/comments. Sure we know that attacks happen in India almost at will, with 2008 being a particularly bad year (Jaipur, Delhi, Bangalore, Ahmedabad, Guwahati and then culminating in Mumbai) and so if then people feel they don't want to come, fine. But if there's a blast in Lahore, why should that reignite talks of security concerns in India? That's quite unfair. I.e. if Lahore hadn't happened, would we still be talking of cancelling IPL? I'm guessing not! Hypothetically, if there was an attack in Mexico City, would people still have issues of going to America to play sport? I think not. I think there are two problems here: 1) neighbouring 3rd world countries are often seen as the same thing by first world-citizen countries and 2) most cricketing nations are islands and so they don't know what it means to have a hostile and unsafe neighbour.

  • allstars_XI on March 5, 2009, 1:24 GMT

    We must admit that terrorism is becoming a problm in the subcontinent. So I would say that it is unsafe for players to play in India and Pakistan. Just imagine if something was to happen while the players attend the IPL. Then we would be facing a situation that Pakistan is facing right now. So I would say that for the time being, players shouldn't be visiting India.

  • mmene on March 4, 2009, 23:13 GMT

    I don't see why people are so defensive about people being nervous about playing in IPL. Do you think if the LeT is willing to kill cricketers in Pakistan they will have objections to doing it in India? It should be the opposite - we should be worried about the Indian cricketers who are playing in IPL. These are blood thirsty killers whose sole goal is to get the maximum publicity at any human cost. And the cheapest and easiest publicity comes from attacking visible public targets. They attacked the Sri Lankans who were trying to do a favor to Pakistan by playing there. They will probably kill their own fathers and mothers to get newspaper headlines. Why would they not try to attack Indias most internationally visible sporting event? Think about it - as much as you don't want it to happen we have to be alert to the monster next door who might just do anything. Hiding from the risk is not the answer. And no one should blame international cricketers for being worried about their lives.

  • waheed on March 4, 2009, 21:18 GMT

    I think this time no country is safe even in India mumbai Attacks in Bangladesh that army incident and in sri lanka tamil scenario so dont blame any country or anyone for these conditions I think we should stand together against these kind of situations these terrorists dont have any nationality religion or name they are just enemies of PEACE...

  • BALA_BAS on March 4, 2009, 20:48 GMT

    Guys..Please calm down. It is upto each individual to decide whether they want go/play or not. If they dont feel safe then it is better to stay away. I am sure IPL is not depending on any foreign players. There are plenty of players in India alone who can keep the IPL on success note. I am also sure that almost all the foreign players will play this year too. If they do, fans will enjoy their game. if they dont,then the fans will still enjoy other's game.

  • ahweak on March 4, 2009, 20:23 GMT

    There are quite a few people who seem to be taking the non-participation of foreign players in IPL personally. Every player can decide for himself and his family whether he should play or not. Not one person here can guarantee that there will not be any incident involving cricket in India in the future. When Indian politicians want Z-level security for accomplishing nothing, why wouldn't anyone else? The sad truth is, security for civilians is not good enough.

  • Sanchonz on March 4, 2009, 20:09 GMT

    Wow, a lot of head in the sand attitudes here. Wasn't Pakistan's cricketing mantra something along the lines of "no cricketer has ever been targeted in Pakistan"? And now, Joe-nobody on the streets of Indian is trying to guarantee player safety? Come on, it's always been a risk to tour the subcontinent and right now those risks are peaking. I think players, coaches, and administrators need to think very carefully and plan extra-well if the IPL is going to go ahead in its current state. Bigger, better players than Oram? You're joking right?

  • physiojk on March 4, 2009, 18:15 GMT

    I think its a farce. If these players dont want to come great cancel their contracts and give it to someone who needs the money.There are far better players than these named ones who are much better. These big players think they are great and want to get money, without any sacrifice. What about the engineers working in Iraq, Afganisthan etc

  • CricketTycoon on March 4, 2009, 18:12 GMT

    IPL is a domestic tournament and should not be postponed if foreign players pull out. However, I feel this a ploy by these recruits to further strengthen security in India. I bet no one wanna loose millions that they're gonna make in IPL. However, we'll still watch IPL if Oram & co pull out. No matter what.. BCCI should continue with the tournament and make a strong statement.

    As far as these hypocrites like Fethcher and Mills are concerned, They just want India to feel miserable, because we did (by making IPL) what they can only hope..

  • krik8crazy on March 4, 2009, 17:33 GMT

    Even during the first season of IPL, there were blasts in Jaipur and about a 100 people died. Now, after the Mumbai attacks and the Lahore attacks, one must seriously question whether security of players and personnel can be guaranteed. Remember that it's not just 2 teams that need to be protected in one city at a time. It's 8 teams playing in different venues and traveling all over the country. The first step the BCCI needs to do is get rid of Lalit Modi. He will say anything and everything to make the teams play. The BCCI and the other boards need to review the security situation and take a balanced decision. Being alive is more important than playing cricket.

  • Satwa_desi on March 4, 2009, 17:12 GMT

    I dont agree with R.O.C.K.... What about the Mumbai attack? Indian security is not nearly as good as it needs to be in the current environment. Although better than Pakistan, we are far from safe... I think it is natural for others to be paranoid, especially after the Mumbai attack since the terrorists have shown that they are willing to go to any extent to kill innocent people in India...

  • Da_Punjabi on March 4, 2009, 16:54 GMT

    Seriously, Why do People think IPL needs foreign Players for it be a totally successful event? Foreign Players' presence is a bonus, and McCullum's opening day batting clicked superbly last year. However, let's not forget that if fans show up, and there is enough sponsorship, it is a success event financially. Indian fans are gonna show up even if Oram or McCullum do not. So let's calm down this unfounded hysteria that IPL season is in doubt. In India, security lapse has a price through ballot boxes.. Our politicians, who are not a different breed from any other country, and like every politician in the globe, are genetically stupid, understand this.

  • gnanavvk on March 4, 2009, 16:53 GMT

    It's natural for these players to have concerns about touring countries in the sub-continent after Tuesday's events in Lahore. I totally agree with Saibaskar's view that unlike Pakistan, India is secure and stable and not prone to terrorism from internal unrest. However the recent Mumbai attacks have shown that we are not yet fully ready to tackle external elements wrecking havoc. Post 26/11,we might have been working towards making our nations' security apparatus better, but it's too early to prove we are better off already.

  • R.O.C.K on March 4, 2009, 16:16 GMT

    Duncan is obviously being paranoid and seems to have nothing much to do other than sitting and criticizing ppl.

  • m.bhatia on March 4, 2009, 16:14 GMT

    I think Mr.Fletcher should talk to KP and ask him, what made him come back for the test series in December. I am he sure he was under no pressure to tour India. Nothing has changed since then. The situation is totally different in India and I think the victims of Lahore incident, the SL team realises that. Rest can percieve whatever they want to. But dont give in to something that these terrorists want.

  • tomru on March 4, 2009, 15:51 GMT

    its really very hard to play cricket in the subcontinent after this situation , specially in pakistan. but i think contries like india , bangladesh and srilanka r standing in a different position than pakistan. this country is now really dangerous not only for cricket but for everything. i am very sorry for them but their government are also not taking strong measure against so called terrorist. i hope that 2011 wc will be held in the subcontinent in india , srilanka and my country bangladesh

  • drdreddy2008 on March 4, 2009, 15:35 GMT

    I think everybody needs to space out and properly assess the situation. It is up to the Indian Government/BCCI to convince the cricketing world that India is a safe country and place stringent measures so nothing even remotely like the Lahore incident can even take place in India. It will be a tough task and if there is even any small incident to take place during IPL, I think World Cup 2011 will be given to Australasia. If everybody is going to play the blame game on countries to tour/not to tour then Caribbean might be the only viable region in the world where cricket can be played without terrorists intervening.

  • East_West on March 4, 2009, 15:35 GMT

    Are you kiding me, "aflatoons" Being an Indian, I can say that we are very much suckers for Terrorism! Look at the recent Mumbai attack!We had no clue and we wake up very late for everything in India!! IPL or anyother sports, it is time for us to watch and watch our tresspassers! Honestly, it is time for us to eliminate terror elements within India, and improve safety for everyone! You can give all the examples of safety in india but I am sure India is not safe anymore!

  • NBRADEE on March 4, 2009, 15:30 GMT

    The situation in Asis has put a damper on 20/20 cricket in the short term. Security concerns can take years to fix, unlike the logistical ones that hamper Windies cricket regionally and Internationally. I would hope that those with foresight and power in the Caribbean can offer an alternative venue for IPL franchises, which can make use of underused stadia, cricket starved patrons, and a tourist-oriented atmosphere suitable for this hyped version of the game. I love what the IPL offers the game for its future development, and loved the games themselves (who can forget Saurav Ganguly leading his team over Mahendra Singh Dhoni's in one of the final games, even when Ganguly's team was playing for pride?).

  • Kafir on March 4, 2009, 15:12 GMT

    Why is that there is a feeling that IPL depends on foreign players? We have enough T20 talent in India and IPL will still be successful... At least I have watched IPL for the sake of Indian players and certainly not for Orams, Gillys, McCullums. It's high time that IPL showed foreign players that it doesn't depend on them. I am not sure why Duncun feels traffic flows only slow in Indian cities. Traffic in most american cities is comparable to Mumbai's, if not slower. America has more random shootings than our metros. Does Duncun think like this before flying to the US? No prizes for guessing...

    IPL is a phenomenon... let's enjoy it whether any outsider comes or not..

  • king1985 on March 4, 2009, 15:00 GMT

    Its really a shame that subcontinent is becoming the victim of terrorism like this. However, there is nothing more important then somebody's life. I don't think you can buy life with money. And money is worthless if one is not alive. At this point in time, anything can happen anywhere in the subcontinent, if i were to go to India (as an Indian) even i would be scared, especially when the elections are coming up....its a bitter truth.

  • reality_truth on March 4, 2009, 15:00 GMT

    India is no less dangerous than Pakistan. Unless India can provide a terror free cities and towns for reasonably long period, no country should visit India. It is not safe. I don't believe in supporting India just because you are a national. You have to hold the government accountable for providing safety and governing the country. They don't do that. They are power hungry and they are in a denial state and worst thing is they are in partnership with criminals and terrorists. They only worry about their holding on to power and as long as terrorists don't directly threaten them they will turn a blind eye.

  • Kirketman on March 4, 2009, 14:46 GMT

    As a responsible citizen of India, and without quoting my occupation, I would sincerely like to inform the whole world that the situation in India is in much excellent condition than Pakistan.

    I hear Duncan alarmed over the traffic, but as a english player they too must have experienced the security in India and how rapidly VVIP's get through the traffic in respect of a normal citizen.

    Post 26/11, security agencies are taking no chance and we can experience it first hand in our day to day lives. So, I dont think any such incident should take place.

    People who live far away from SE Asia, normally believe the area to be a trouble one, because of the happenings. But, India, the nation it is, its very hard to compare with countries like Pak, SriLanka, Nepal, Burma etc. and even for that matter China. We are different. Moral Values, Patriotism, Democracy, are the things that we get as a form of birth right.

    So, Its hard to imagine the same thing happening here in India.

  • kksac on March 4, 2009, 14:38 GMT

    usman,you seem to try your best to show india and pak are the same. pak will never get sympathy as india as we are being targetted by them. india whas much more organised security measures than pak.

  • Saibaskar on March 4, 2009, 14:14 GMT

    I think situation in India and in Pakistan are totally different. Yes India is a victim of terror but does not face an internal unrest. Most of the terrorism it faced in recent past have been on soft ungaurded targets and not on targets which are secured by the security forces. Cricketers in India are protected people and therefore i think there is no special danger for teams to come and play in India. But, yes players have to make decision based on what they percieve so it is ok if they dont turn up. As far as IPL is concerned it did have a good take-off last year so even if there are less players from abroad the momentum will still be there and will also help a lot of local players to have better exposure.

  • koolshabbir on March 4, 2009, 14:06 GMT

    if any player has security concern then they must not tour india. IPL will be a sucess even without foreign players. every one has joined IPL for money so its upto individual player if he needs tht money or not #.....

  • mahmoon_85 on March 4, 2009, 14:05 GMT

    Its a shame that certain extremists now targetting sporting personnels. All nations must join hand to wipe away acts of terrorisms. IPL being a grand event in the globe, it should not be interupted. i hope that indian officials along with other sources must take serious initiatives for the safety of each and every player. terrorists may take advantage of the election in creating huge fuzz. from this instance all related authorities should take initiatives to bring this grand event a success. i hope IPL will take place this season successfully may even after the elections rather than both being held at same time..

  • dgupta on March 4, 2009, 13:49 GMT

    There is no question of anyone boycotting the IPL. India is very much capable of handling with any threat scenario. Incidents like those in Mumbai occurred because Indian security forces were caught unprepared. But this time, things will be different.

    And India is the safest place in the subcontinent. Duncan Fletcher's concerns are baseless and seems as if he is more media hungry, rather than being concerned for the safety of English players.

  • Maxusa on March 4, 2009, 13:46 GMT

    Come on Duncan Fletcher!!! let us stop playing cricket in all countries. Have you forgoten how easy it was for terrorist to pull off attacks in UK? Perhaps the same ugly experience could fall on poor innocent cricketers even in UK. How about the Ausies who are always paranoid? The number of Ausies that perished in Bali was a lesson for all and in fact the entire world that we are never safe and we cant just use a broad brush to paint India in the same risk category as Pakistan. The safety and security of innocent people is threatened in all corners.

  • usmanzone on March 4, 2009, 12:54 GMT

    It would be appropriate for the kiwis and aussies to bycott the IPL as india has also seen many major terror attacks. Last year's bomb blasts in Jaipur during the IPL should have served notice. The security lapse in the Mumbai incidents shows India is also not a safe place anymore.

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  • usmanzone on March 4, 2009, 12:54 GMT

    It would be appropriate for the kiwis and aussies to bycott the IPL as india has also seen many major terror attacks. Last year's bomb blasts in Jaipur during the IPL should have served notice. The security lapse in the Mumbai incidents shows India is also not a safe place anymore.

  • Maxusa on March 4, 2009, 13:46 GMT

    Come on Duncan Fletcher!!! let us stop playing cricket in all countries. Have you forgoten how easy it was for terrorist to pull off attacks in UK? Perhaps the same ugly experience could fall on poor innocent cricketers even in UK. How about the Ausies who are always paranoid? The number of Ausies that perished in Bali was a lesson for all and in fact the entire world that we are never safe and we cant just use a broad brush to paint India in the same risk category as Pakistan. The safety and security of innocent people is threatened in all corners.

  • dgupta on March 4, 2009, 13:49 GMT

    There is no question of anyone boycotting the IPL. India is very much capable of handling with any threat scenario. Incidents like those in Mumbai occurred because Indian security forces were caught unprepared. But this time, things will be different.

    And India is the safest place in the subcontinent. Duncan Fletcher's concerns are baseless and seems as if he is more media hungry, rather than being concerned for the safety of English players.

  • mahmoon_85 on March 4, 2009, 14:05 GMT

    Its a shame that certain extremists now targetting sporting personnels. All nations must join hand to wipe away acts of terrorisms. IPL being a grand event in the globe, it should not be interupted. i hope that indian officials along with other sources must take serious initiatives for the safety of each and every player. terrorists may take advantage of the election in creating huge fuzz. from this instance all related authorities should take initiatives to bring this grand event a success. i hope IPL will take place this season successfully may even after the elections rather than both being held at same time..

  • koolshabbir on March 4, 2009, 14:06 GMT

    if any player has security concern then they must not tour india. IPL will be a sucess even without foreign players. every one has joined IPL for money so its upto individual player if he needs tht money or not #.....

  • Saibaskar on March 4, 2009, 14:14 GMT

    I think situation in India and in Pakistan are totally different. Yes India is a victim of terror but does not face an internal unrest. Most of the terrorism it faced in recent past have been on soft ungaurded targets and not on targets which are secured by the security forces. Cricketers in India are protected people and therefore i think there is no special danger for teams to come and play in India. But, yes players have to make decision based on what they percieve so it is ok if they dont turn up. As far as IPL is concerned it did have a good take-off last year so even if there are less players from abroad the momentum will still be there and will also help a lot of local players to have better exposure.

  • kksac on March 4, 2009, 14:38 GMT

    usman,you seem to try your best to show india and pak are the same. pak will never get sympathy as india as we are being targetted by them. india whas much more organised security measures than pak.

  • Kirketman on March 4, 2009, 14:46 GMT

    As a responsible citizen of India, and without quoting my occupation, I would sincerely like to inform the whole world that the situation in India is in much excellent condition than Pakistan.

    I hear Duncan alarmed over the traffic, but as a english player they too must have experienced the security in India and how rapidly VVIP's get through the traffic in respect of a normal citizen.

    Post 26/11, security agencies are taking no chance and we can experience it first hand in our day to day lives. So, I dont think any such incident should take place.

    People who live far away from SE Asia, normally believe the area to be a trouble one, because of the happenings. But, India, the nation it is, its very hard to compare with countries like Pak, SriLanka, Nepal, Burma etc. and even for that matter China. We are different. Moral Values, Patriotism, Democracy, are the things that we get as a form of birth right.

    So, Its hard to imagine the same thing happening here in India.

  • reality_truth on March 4, 2009, 15:00 GMT

    India is no less dangerous than Pakistan. Unless India can provide a terror free cities and towns for reasonably long period, no country should visit India. It is not safe. I don't believe in supporting India just because you are a national. You have to hold the government accountable for providing safety and governing the country. They don't do that. They are power hungry and they are in a denial state and worst thing is they are in partnership with criminals and terrorists. They only worry about their holding on to power and as long as terrorists don't directly threaten them they will turn a blind eye.

  • king1985 on March 4, 2009, 15:00 GMT

    Its really a shame that subcontinent is becoming the victim of terrorism like this. However, there is nothing more important then somebody's life. I don't think you can buy life with money. And money is worthless if one is not alive. At this point in time, anything can happen anywhere in the subcontinent, if i were to go to India (as an Indian) even i would be scared, especially when the elections are coming up....its a bitter truth.