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Raised on radio

In the West Indies, the relationship you formed with cricket was filtered through one omnipresent medium

Vaneisa Baksh

February 28, 2008

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Many West Indians learned to love cricket through the radio. Television came late, and the only time people could see their heroes was when they played locally. Even then, not many could attend matches that were not taking place in their territories.

The relationships generations formed with Test cricket were filtered through the commentary of John Arlott and others from across the seas. The eloquence of these commentators, and the imagery they invoked, suited a West Indian culture deeply immersed in its oral traditions. All the great stories of West Indian heroics had been handed down by mouth. Written accounts would come as a literary culture began to flourish, but in the early days the listener had the liberty to configure a hero based on the storyteller's skill.

Thus the radio offered its own magic, transmitting tales of brave deeds done in lands far away. How could it not enthral? The former West Indies fast bowler Ian Bishop's first memory of cricket was of lying on the living room floor at night with his brother, diligently copying down the scores made by a Test debutant far away in India. The batsman was Viv Richards. The Bishop boys were building their archive of inspiration with a small radio glued to their ears.

You'd have had to love cricket, though, to take the tinny transistor sound. It used to drive Curtly Ambrose crazy, the way his mother would be listening till all hours of the early morning. He wasn't interested in the game, and she was obsessed. She dreamed her big dreams for her sons, and when Aldensa, the elder Ambrose, migrated and dropped cricket, she set her sights on Curtly. And that was that.

Today a plethora of technological devices have stripped cricket of artifice and mystery. Replays: real time or ultra slow motion; angles: up, down, sideways, or inside the stumps. What can you hide? You can measure a bowler's action to the nth degree, calculate a batsman's weakness based on the number of times he's got out to a ball landing in precisely this spot at exactly this speed.

What's missing from this surround-sound, big-screen picture? Imagination. You can't construct your hero with some material of your own choice. Television presents a complete image. More importantly, all those waves of technology have not penetrated too deeply into the islands - and although I say islands, I include Guyana. For those who travel and visit the West Indies there is the tendency to measure the territories in terms of the direct experiences of hotels, cabs, and nightspots. Yes, people party here, but they make their livings too. A hotel with modern facilities is designed for a tourist; it does not express the real way of life.

 
 
The radio offered its own magic, transmitting tales of brave deeds done in lands far away. How could it not enthral? The former West Indies fast bowler Ian Bishop's first memory of cricket was of lying on the living room floor at night with his brother, diligently copying down the scores made by a Test debutant far away in India. The batsman was Viv Richards
 

Some of the economies, like Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, Antigua, and Jamaica, can support households with access to televisions, computers, internet and so on. But although televisions have grown more commonplace, radios still find a home everywhere. In the most rural of spots it is possible to hear the sound of Bob Marley bursting out of some tinny transistor. In truth, without trying to romanticise poverty, there is something about hearing Marley on a transistor coming from a shack in the heart of the bush that makes you feel the power of his music. It gives it a context of authenticity.

I suspect there is something of this in the pull of radio despite the advanced state of technology. A culture that evolved from listening to the day's play on the radio has linked it to authenticity. The commentator had to be trusted because he was the voice of the griot.

This trust remains because it is part of a pact made between listener and broadcaster. The early voices of Trinidad and Tobago's radio commentators were men of stature and knowledge, like Raffi Knowles, and the former cricketers Learie Constantine and Gerry Gomez. They followed that line of excitement and eloquence imbibed from Arlott.

Paget deFreitas, a veteran journalist who grew up adoring Richards in Antigua, tells of how he followed Richards's maiden hundred at Delhi in 1974: "Berry Sarbadhikary, the Indian commentator, screamed excitedly - 'That's a big hit. The ball is going 20, no 30, no 40 metres over the stands.' It filled me with pride, confirming that the world was recognising my hero."

That was the same voice Ian Bishop was hearing, and that is how deep a good commentator can go. The Caribbean has produced one of the finest commentators in Tony Cozier, and other notable voices like Michael Holding, Ian Bishop, and Fazeer Mohammed. Each brings a different style but maintains respect by knowing the game intimately and bringing that knowledge to their commentary.

The listener can take this information and do with it whatever his mind pleases, filling in whatever he finds missing. If you want to understand the root of rum-shop talk, and why there are so many experts on every corner, look around. Bet there's a radio nearby.

Vaneisa Baksh is a freelance journalist based in Trinidad. This article was first published in the print edition of Cricinfo Magazine in 2006

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Posted by delboy on (February 28, 2008, 9:39 GMT)

Well said..I always thought no one else share my sentiments in this regard. Commentators of old focused on the game and not slagging off the players in the field or constantly referring to "MY DAY".

When the BBC had anything to do with it and grammer etc mattered I favoured muting the TV and listening to the commentary on the radio. Alas cricket is about advertising space and personalities rather than orators or people capable of describing what is going on.

Posted by ramesh_sound on (February 28, 2008, 8:37 GMT)

Hi,

While Tony Cozier has been there since time immemorial, I thought Reds Pereira was also very good and informative. As TV commentary with former players has proliferated, voice quality of commentators has come down. You could still identify Tony Cozier on the basis of his voice and how smooth it sounds; Can't say the same thing for Michael Slater!

regards

Posted by siddharthh on (February 28, 2008, 8:24 GMT)

Great article. The transistor was my only source of live commentary until as recently as 2003, as I was in boarding school and we had no access to live television. In fact, radios were banned too. I remember keeping one on the sly and listening to the commentary of any game that was on- whether that meant bunking class, listening to commentary in class (we actually managed to do that on the sly) or staying up late in the dormitories. My greatest memory of listening to radio commentary is of the 2002 Natwest final when India beat England in that great game at Lord's. There were at least 10 of us crowded around one tiny transistor, trying to picture exactly what was happening, as the commentary rambled on... oh what great times!!

Posted by hl_cadambi on (February 28, 2008, 4:20 GMT)

Dear Vanessa Lovely article, so much of what you say is so real to me!! Iam Indian, and we first got TV in 1982 (and proper cricket coverage much later than that). I started following cricket in 1960, all on the radio - Test match tickets could hardly be got for love or money in those Test-match crazy days. For people like me, following tests in England or even Australia was not too difficult; but tests in West Indies was another matter altogether given the time difference! It meant smuggling the family transistor to bed, and keeping the volume low so that parents would not hear it and come anfd confiscate it with a stern warning to go to sleep and be ready for school in the morning!! John Arlott, Alan McGilvray, Tony Cozier, et al were people who brought things alive! Thanks for the article, Cad

What are your memories of the good old days of radio commentary?
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Vaneisa BakshClose
Vaneisa Baksh Vaneisa Baksh has been studying West Indies cricket's history for ages, and has been writing on the game for even longer. She has been admitted as a member of the Queen's Park Cricket Club in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, which recently opened its doors to females. She hasn't become one of the boys yet, though.

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