Samir Chopra August 12, 2010

Aggression or just plain petulance?

I'm not huge fan of coaches, and I have said so on this blog
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I'm not huge fan of coaches, and I have said so on this blog. Part of the reason is the mind-numbingly inane remarks that pepper most of their conversations with the press. After reading Duncan Fletcher's pronouncements on the latest tantrum thrown by Stuart Broad, I think I've been entirely justified in the snappiness of my remarks (ok, he is an ex-coach, but you catch my drift).

Consider for instance, Fletcher's claim that, in throwing the ball at Haider, "Broad was responding to frustration, not pressure. They are completely different things." This sounds like a very sophisticated distinction but in point of fact, it's a sophistical one. Broad was frustrated precisely because he was under pressure. Sportsmen, mediocre ones especially, have a tendency to get frustrated when they are under pressure from their opponents. That's why they slam rackets, curse umpires, or pick fights with spectators and/or other players. It's a sign of weakness, not aggression and it is what distinguishes the greats from the also-rans.

Even more confusing in some ways is Fletcher's suggestion that we not judge Broad on the basis of his on-field displays; that indeed, a "true" picture of his character will be better formed by having access to his dressing-room demeanour. This is again, a vacuous claim couched in the garb of a seemingly holistic approach. Why spectators, who only have access to a player's public performances, and who are engaged in critiquing a player's publicpersona should be be concerned with a player's dressing-room behavior is beyond me. We are critiquing a player's public behavior, aren't we?

I personally don't care if Stuart Broad doesn't call his mum every week, or helps old ladies across the street, or sends his yearly earnings to Oxfam. I'd simply like him to stop behaving, on a cricket field, like a school-kid who keeps begging for six of the best. But the match referees haven't obliged until now, and even then, given his recidivist inclinations, "Broady" got away lightly.

But it is not all Duncan Fletcher's fault. The biggest culprit is the partial acceptance in the cricketing world of the incoherent claim that rudeness, petulance, and plain old immaturity are somehow equivalent to aggression. So long as that piece of idiocy continues to make the rounds, we'll continue to be treated to the spectacle of grown men throwing their toys out of the pram.

Samir Chopra lives in Brooklyn and teaches Philosophy at the City University of New York. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • chris on September 1, 2010, 18:33 GMT

    Why is there so much veneration of CHRIS Broad? He was certainly one of my least favourite players - and I lived in Bristol and watched Gloucestershire when he played for them. Stuart may have been silly on occasions, but he's a much better player than his father.

  • af on August 22, 2010, 21:56 GMT

    To say that "indeed, a “true” picture of his character will be better formed by having access to his dressing-room demeanour" is tantamount to saying that it's OK to have a nasty behaviour toward the opposition as long as you are well mannered in the dressing room. What should one call it, hypocrisy or plain arrogance?

  • Cliff on August 17, 2010, 16:01 GMT

    Brian I am a west indian and Holding and co were my cricketing heroes. Yes it was Croft who ran into umpire Fred Goodall but in that same series Holding did kick out the stumps.You must look it up because it was a beautiful kick indeed.

    If it is not racism at best it comes off as if some are "entitled" to privaleges in cricket more than others.

  • Sean O'Sullivan on August 17, 2010, 12:37 GMT

    I'm afraid Broad's boorish behaviour is symptomatic of a generally mean-spirited approach by England teams of late - recent examples include the refusal to applaud Haidar's 50 in the last test, to the run out of a New Zealand player in a one-day game following a collision mid-pitch. Strauss/Collingwood would no doubt argue that they are being professional and aggressive but what comes across is petulance. The Aussies under Ian Chappell and Waugh or the Windies under Clive Lloyd were aggressive but they played the game in the right way; no-one wants England to be soft touch but there is something begrudging and childish about the way the current team behave towards opponents

  • neil on August 17, 2010, 12:12 GMT

    Fletcher's comments irk me because I actually wrote in to BBC's Test Match Special with a related question for an interview Jonathan Agnew was having with Fletcher and Michael Vaughan. I asked if it had been a conscious decision to instill a 'win at all costs' mindset in the England team under Fletcher pre the 2005 ashes series. My question was justified, I believe, by the Jones/Hayden incident (similar to this one with Broad), the use of specialist substitute fielders, and the Harmison/Inzamam incident in the tour to India which followed.

    Fletcher didn't actually say 'no' but claimed that he believed one should always play the game fairly and how you would want to influence children to grow up playing the game. Well, by his answer and his comments to the Broad incident, I'm guessing the next generation of schoolboys and tomorrow's 'professionals' are going to be a bunch of sulky aggressives always seeing how far they can push the umpires and the 'spirit of cricket'...

  • Abrar on August 17, 2010, 10:42 GMT

    To Brian -Qld

    Intersting that you mention Michael Holding "wouldn't resort to such pathetic stuff". True, he is unlikely to have thrown a ball at a batsman, but I remember the "elegant" (could it be any other way?)way that he kicked down the stumps in frustration on being being given out in NZ during a test many moons ago.

    Having said this I I have the utmotst respect for Mikey's achievements and cricketing nous.

  • Abrar on August 17, 2010, 10:41 GMT

    To Brian -Qld

    Intersting that you mention Michael Holding "wouldn't resort to such pathetic stuff". True, he is unlikely to have thrown a ball at a batsman, but I remember the "elegant" (could it be any other way?)way that he kicked down the stumps in frustration on being being given out in NZ during a test many moons ago.

    Having said this I I have the utmotst respect for Mikey's achievements and cricketing nous.

  • JOEY on August 17, 2010, 8:56 GMT

    Like father like son, both petulant. But if you get rid of Chris, his circle of friends in the refrees office will still protect his son. I recently read on here that all the refrees hang out together on tours so the younger Broad will be protected by daddies mates. I hope that by some coincidance he(sauart) gets injured and boy will I celebrate.

  • Anonymous on August 17, 2010, 7:00 GMT

    "Sportsmen, mediocre ones especially," - Very subtle and classic...The day Yuvi hit him for 6 SIXers, Broad has been taking out his frustration at every opposition and he is still not finished...his career might finish earlier than his frustrations...!

  • Brian - Qld on August 17, 2010, 4:33 GMT

    Very good article, and unfortunately this sort of childish behaviour will only increase. Some commentators keep going on about 'aggression' when in fact it's boorish uncontrolled behaviour. I'd rather leave out the racism card though that some of your readers have raised. By the way it was Colin Croft that ran into the umpire (Fred Goodall) in NZ. Michael Holding was a great player and would never have resorted to such pathetic stuff. He let the ball do the talking

  • chris on September 1, 2010, 18:33 GMT

    Why is there so much veneration of CHRIS Broad? He was certainly one of my least favourite players - and I lived in Bristol and watched Gloucestershire when he played for them. Stuart may have been silly on occasions, but he's a much better player than his father.

  • af on August 22, 2010, 21:56 GMT

    To say that "indeed, a “true” picture of his character will be better formed by having access to his dressing-room demeanour" is tantamount to saying that it's OK to have a nasty behaviour toward the opposition as long as you are well mannered in the dressing room. What should one call it, hypocrisy or plain arrogance?

  • Cliff on August 17, 2010, 16:01 GMT

    Brian I am a west indian and Holding and co were my cricketing heroes. Yes it was Croft who ran into umpire Fred Goodall but in that same series Holding did kick out the stumps.You must look it up because it was a beautiful kick indeed.

    If it is not racism at best it comes off as if some are "entitled" to privaleges in cricket more than others.

  • Sean O'Sullivan on August 17, 2010, 12:37 GMT

    I'm afraid Broad's boorish behaviour is symptomatic of a generally mean-spirited approach by England teams of late - recent examples include the refusal to applaud Haidar's 50 in the last test, to the run out of a New Zealand player in a one-day game following a collision mid-pitch. Strauss/Collingwood would no doubt argue that they are being professional and aggressive but what comes across is petulance. The Aussies under Ian Chappell and Waugh or the Windies under Clive Lloyd were aggressive but they played the game in the right way; no-one wants England to be soft touch but there is something begrudging and childish about the way the current team behave towards opponents

  • neil on August 17, 2010, 12:12 GMT

    Fletcher's comments irk me because I actually wrote in to BBC's Test Match Special with a related question for an interview Jonathan Agnew was having with Fletcher and Michael Vaughan. I asked if it had been a conscious decision to instill a 'win at all costs' mindset in the England team under Fletcher pre the 2005 ashes series. My question was justified, I believe, by the Jones/Hayden incident (similar to this one with Broad), the use of specialist substitute fielders, and the Harmison/Inzamam incident in the tour to India which followed.

    Fletcher didn't actually say 'no' but claimed that he believed one should always play the game fairly and how you would want to influence children to grow up playing the game. Well, by his answer and his comments to the Broad incident, I'm guessing the next generation of schoolboys and tomorrow's 'professionals' are going to be a bunch of sulky aggressives always seeing how far they can push the umpires and the 'spirit of cricket'...

  • Abrar on August 17, 2010, 10:42 GMT

    To Brian -Qld

    Intersting that you mention Michael Holding "wouldn't resort to such pathetic stuff". True, he is unlikely to have thrown a ball at a batsman, but I remember the "elegant" (could it be any other way?)way that he kicked down the stumps in frustration on being being given out in NZ during a test many moons ago.

    Having said this I I have the utmotst respect for Mikey's achievements and cricketing nous.

  • Abrar on August 17, 2010, 10:41 GMT

    To Brian -Qld

    Intersting that you mention Michael Holding "wouldn't resort to such pathetic stuff". True, he is unlikely to have thrown a ball at a batsman, but I remember the "elegant" (could it be any other way?)way that he kicked down the stumps in frustration on being being given out in NZ during a test many moons ago.

    Having said this I I have the utmotst respect for Mikey's achievements and cricketing nous.

  • JOEY on August 17, 2010, 8:56 GMT

    Like father like son, both petulant. But if you get rid of Chris, his circle of friends in the refrees office will still protect his son. I recently read on here that all the refrees hang out together on tours so the younger Broad will be protected by daddies mates. I hope that by some coincidance he(sauart) gets injured and boy will I celebrate.

  • Anonymous on August 17, 2010, 7:00 GMT

    "Sportsmen, mediocre ones especially," - Very subtle and classic...The day Yuvi hit him for 6 SIXers, Broad has been taking out his frustration at every opposition and he is still not finished...his career might finish earlier than his frustrations...!

  • Brian - Qld on August 17, 2010, 4:33 GMT

    Very good article, and unfortunately this sort of childish behaviour will only increase. Some commentators keep going on about 'aggression' when in fact it's boorish uncontrolled behaviour. I'd rather leave out the racism card though that some of your readers have raised. By the way it was Colin Croft that ran into the umpire (Fred Goodall) in NZ. Michael Holding was a great player and would never have resorted to such pathetic stuff. He let the ball do the talking

  • Girish on August 17, 2010, 2:27 GMT

    @ longmemory well said mate "yuvi's six sixers lolz ...! "

  • cliff on August 16, 2010, 23:18 GMT

    Is there a better way for a fast bowler to be aggressive than to bowl some vicious bouncers at the batsman? There are aggressive bowlers and agressive batsmen. After the batsman was hit by Broad, he could have gotten really aggressive against the off spinner. I mean the bat could have slipped from his grasp after playing some powerful sweeps which would have been of great concern to the short legs if they were still conscious. If we want to support ignorance in the name of aggression, then let us be really ignorant and agressive.

    When the WI had aggressive fast bowlers in their heyday, the ICC changed the rules on bouncers. Changed the rules of the game to weaken a team that was doing nothing illegal but just utilizing its assets. Some how actions such as Broad's are acceptable as aggressive in some quarters. That is such a joke especially for a fast bowler.

    That type of biases weakens the game. The west Indies are weak today but international cricket misses a strong WI.

  • Saleem Khwaja on August 16, 2010, 21:22 GMT

    Fancy just a slap on the wrist for the behaviour for which any body else will be kicked out of the series and heavily fined. Is this because this Broad kid has connections or is he English on English soil? It could be any of these. Personally I would smack his behind, kick him out and fine him heavily. pakistan board has behaved rather immature in not raising the issue in the strongest terms or is the Eastern hospitality?

  • waterbuffalo on August 16, 2010, 17:57 GMT

    Nice one otter, Connors and McEnroe went berserk all the time, and they were the best, Holding was so incensed in NZ he ran into the umpire, Hadlee,Imran,Lillee, freaked out all the time, to expect a fast bowler to keep cool is nonsense, either the writer does not know history or, more probbably, he has never bowled an over in his life. I am a pakistan supporter, but I do not like racism brought into every discussion, it is counter-productive.

  • marirs on August 16, 2010, 17:05 GMT

    Hmmmm. All said and done, the color of the skin somehow has an inordinate role over how much you are punished. Stuart of course has the nepotism advantage too, but how many times have everyone seen non-white players being penalized for far less offenses? Unfortunately, the application of double standards has become blatant over the years, in spite of improvements in all other spheres.

  • Otter on August 16, 2010, 5:47 GMT

    Samir,

    Going by your brilliant logic, John Mcenroe must be a very mediocre tennis player. A display of arrogance or anger has nothing to do with mediocrity, it's about a man's inherent nature. Please don't bulldoze your psychological mumbo-jumbo when you understand nothing about them.

  • waterbuffalo on August 16, 2010, 4:53 GMT

    I admit it is terrible that Haider's finger was broken, but cricket , TESY cricket is a tough game, it it not like Broad is the first bowler who ever threw at the batsman, every country has done it, cricket is a gentleman's game? please the Windies in 73 and the aussies since Ian Chappell played to win , not to play 'the gentleman's game', Alec Stewart used to cheat all the time, cricket hasn't been a gentleman's game since the early 60's. Every single country does what it can to win.

  • Metman on August 15, 2010, 23:47 GMT

    @reverse discrimination!Utter rubbish!Murali was called because he was not white!Stuart Broad,I know some WI players WILL be after you,next time you meet!By then you should have consumed enough breast milk and matured enough to be called an adult.

  • Harminder on August 15, 2010, 23:38 GMT

    I saw Broad's reaction on live TV and it was totally not on. Period! Stuart has shown petulance with umpire's decision before and this is a step forward. Match referees need to get out of their air-conditioned rooms and make hard-calls if they are watching the game like other fans and not snoozing in thier comfy chairs while on the dime. Are we waiting for a day when he puts a stump through a opposite player and then show him the rule book??? This aside I will also say this English players typically have been hard nosed but are known for fair play. This was downright petulance which should be curbed. Even Mcgrath and Warne did hurl the ball back to wicket-keeper or at the wickets but that was obvious as aggression not initimdation "off-the-ball" . Totally not-on!!!

  • Tom Lawlor on August 15, 2010, 23:25 GMT

    This article is indicative of the poor journalism present on cricinfo recently. One thing that really stands out is this quote "I personally don’t care if Stuart Broad doesn’t call his mum every week" Considering that Broads mother died just over a month ago, this is a really good reason why article should be pulled.

  • Essex Eagles on August 15, 2010, 21:08 GMT

    @Reverse Discrimination who says "The only reason murali played test cricket and wasnt banned is because he wasnt (white)." What an ignorant remark!!! If Murali was white, he wouldn't have been "called" in the first place. As simple as that. all those umpires they themselves were less than snow white as it turned out to be. Interestingly enough, one of the few non Aussie umpires who "called" Murali happened to be prat Stuart's dear old daddy Chris Board. Murali had to endure all the insults,abuse and go through hell, if the ICC didn't want to "cave in" as you say, they would've done it long before technology proved that Murali's action was clean. There were lots of other bowlers (including some Aussies), who were over the acceptable level of degrees before the rule changed.

  • Cricpolitics on August 15, 2010, 19:44 GMT

    Didn't Afridi bite the ball in frustration too? I thought that was quite entertaining and good for the on stage drama which still attracts many viewers. Why then he was banned for two matches? It's just plain rubbish. Mama's boy "Broady" must be getting ready to be spanked at Oval in couple of days since the conditions are not going to help him much, and I hope he does and fractures his foot or something while kicking the ground this time around.

  • Shabut on August 15, 2010, 19:37 GMT

    From what I read it sounded like Haider's finger injury, that will rule him out from rest of the series, was agravated by the ball thrown at him by Broad. What will be the punishment if somone from the spectator had thrown something at Broady and injured him. Wouldn't he be banned for life from entering the stadium again and perhaps serve some jail time too? Afridi was banned for two matches for causing injury to the ball but how in the world Broad could get away so cheaply for injuring a human?? Absolute rubbish.

  • PADDLE SWEEP on August 15, 2010, 18:43 GMT

    master blaster sachin once said-"if aggression helps your game improve then its good.for me aggression is silence of words and positive approach with performance the focus!"

  • BACK FOOT PUNCH on August 15, 2010, 18:26 GMT

    aggression alone cant give them ashes.it will be interesting to watch if he does that to ponting.ICC should make rule that if that happens again ,the bowler cant bowl in that inning.i still think stuart watched replay of him vs yuvraj in durban 2007!!!

  • BACK FOOT PUNCH on August 15, 2010, 18:17 GMT

    hey guys forgive stuart,he probably watched the recording of yuvraj's 6 sixes off him the previous night! By the way these english commentators are commenting,it sounds cocky for the gentlemen's game,isn't it?punishment is justified though for utter nonsense !!!

  • Mike on August 15, 2010, 17:46 GMT

    I think you have touched a nerve here, ouch! Broad's puerile petulance has been "accepted" for too long without any real punishment. in a way he is so English, which is why I chose to live in Canada and support the Aussies.

  • cliff on August 15, 2010, 16:44 GMT

    Pierre Taco, you talk about englismen being meek and the need to get under opponents' skin. That is all well and good but I hope englismen do not feel that they also have right to determine the level of retaliation by their opponents.

    They day may not be far away when an incident on the cricket field may spark a riot or a real nasty physical confrontation between two aggressive players involving bats, the ball and stumps.

    One more thing, this stuff about english cricketers being meek is a myth. Ask Freddie Trueman, John Snow, Ian Botham, Tony Greig, Mike Gatting, the bodyline series........

  • Anupam on August 15, 2010, 13:25 GMT

    Its not just about Broad's behaviour but also about the way Staruss reacted to the incident..Instead of talking to Broad and taking him to task he says that there is a need to poeple like Broad in Dressing room to keep up the aggression..How does this rude behaviour fills a team with will to fight? Can't say if that true at all. Broad is getting away everytime while others like Amir are getting punished and talked to for celebration..What fun..

  • P.N.Sudarshan on August 15, 2010, 7:32 GMT

    On a quick review of the past 10 years decisions by various match referees, it appears that a match referee lets off players who apologize and admit to their guilt, with a "Boys will by boys" remark. Bulk of the Aussies and some of the English cricketers have perfected this technique, with public interface by apologisits like Duncan Fletcher. I only hope we dont see a serious assault on the cricket field owing to this indulgent attitude of the match referees.

  • hpfan on August 15, 2010, 4:24 GMT

    Anyone thinks he both looks AND behaves like Draco Malfoy from Harry Potter?

  • Shonok Rohan on August 14, 2010, 23:13 GMT

    I agree with "Anonymous" comment, icc is not treating players of different nations equally.Now it seems to be that Aus Eng ind Sa are owning icc and others are just ......

  • alex green on August 14, 2010, 21:28 GMT

    Broad's action has totally left me ashamed of myself as an English. And i really wasnt expecting this childlike response from fletcher. I totally am of the opinion that ECB should really penalize Broad so as to set an example for others.

  • cliff on August 14, 2010, 21:03 GMT

    A cricket ball thrown at close range with force is very dangerous and batsmen should not take that lightly even if the authorities seem to be looking the other way. Broad picked the batsman on whom to take out his frustration carefully.

    On the last tour of the west indies he was frustrated with the dead pitches but did he throw a ball at a batsman. Maybe he should try that with Sulieman Benn. He is playing in a safe era. He should have been around when the Sylvester Clarkes, Colin Crofts and Viv Richards's were around. He would never try that. Roy Gilchrist would have been a good opponent.

    Monkey knows what tree to jump on.

  • drcardio on August 14, 2010, 20:25 GMT

    It is disgusting.Poor Haider has his finger fractured by throw of ball at him.Broad should be arrested by the police for asault.Its serious & he should also be sued for compensation for damage to carrier of young lad.

  • Gentleman on August 14, 2010, 20:02 GMT

    Now that it is confirmed that Haider aggravated the injury and will take no further part in the series, the match referee need to re look at this incident.

  • Nadeem Qureshi on August 14, 2010, 17:52 GMT

    Consider the hypothetical situation: Shoaib Akhtar fails to acknowledge the umpire in an LBW appeal, and then throws a ball at an English debutant (later to reveal that the throw led to a fractured finger)... what are the odds of him playing ANY more matches on that tour?

    That Ijaz Butt's PCB would fine him a few billion rupees and slap him with a 7-year ban only for it all to be forgiven once he appeals his case is a different story of course. But, for a while lets not get sucked into comedy and focus on the hypothetical situation, shall we?

  • Anonymous on August 14, 2010, 17:03 GMT

    Personally, I'd like bowlers to beam Broady until they hurt him. Badly.

  • vivek on August 14, 2010, 15:09 GMT

    a well written article..what "broady's" public behaviour does is that it that makes his "rudeness, petulance, and plain old immaturity"something for the impressionable minds to emulate....he needs to be diciplned!

  • reverse discrimination on August 14, 2010, 14:30 GMT

    Agreed that Broad is out of order - and has been for some time. But i have this to say to all those who think hes getting away with it because he is 'white'. The only reason murali played test cricket and wasnt banned is because he wasnt (white). The rules were changed because the ICC didnt want a serious political issue on the situation so the caved. So if its true - maybe whats good for the goose is also good for the gander.

  • Met man on August 14, 2010, 12:23 GMT

    Stuart Broad should be in pampers not whites!He"s just a toddler in long pants parading as a cricketer.He is MUCH too immature to be playing this gentlemans game.The caning he got from Yuvraj still has this juvenile confused and he is attempting to take it out on anyone!He better dont try that stunt in Jamaica.He is too hyper,and needs to be put on a diet of breast milk .

  • Krishna on August 14, 2010, 10:58 GMT

    Have you ever seen Sachin behaving like this right from his debut to till date. Even if he was aware that he is been given out by mistake he would never ever argue with the umpire and if he knows that he has knicked and he would not wait for the umpire to call. If he is in anger and if he under pressure, he lets his bat do the talking.

  • naresh on August 14, 2010, 4:29 GMT

    "gnore the chips on their shoulders and leave the discipline to the authorities who are utterly equivocal in these matters."

    Hey Joe - I suggest you check the meaning of "equivocal" - unless of course there was a pun intended.

  • Shahzad on August 13, 2010, 22:24 GMT

    Right-on. This is not something new as he has done some stupid stuff before and got away cause of his father. This is height of discrimination and goes against the spirit of the game. ICC is biased and the decision (some of their) shows.

  • sajjo on August 13, 2010, 19:24 GMT

    broad should have been handed a ban. this racism and prejudice in cricket to west indian and asian players is unacceptable. its been going on ever since i started to watch cricket 10 years ago, and nothing has changed since then

  • Derrick on August 13, 2010, 18:13 GMT

    Broad should every now and then watch the video of Yuvraj Singh and the 36 runs in an over. That should provide ample reminder to him to retain some humility while playing the game.

  • surya on August 13, 2010, 17:27 GMT

    Nice article.I can understand your anger abt fletcher's article.Real aggression is not abt sledging or throwing a ball or in open provocations,its best exemplified in the line,length you bowl and the intent you show in plotting a batsman out.Broad perhaps got vulnerable seeing his team mates pick wickets in a jiffy in conditions suiting them and duly responded badly under pressure.None is going take it seriously.Do we take a 5 year old kid's tantrums as aggression?.nope!more than him,the people who create new philosophies to support his acts concern me.

  • Pierre Taco on August 13, 2010, 17:01 GMT

    Erm, you cannot be serious about world-class sportsmen never losing their rag... What about John McEnroe? Ponting in the after being run out by Gary Pratt? Zidane headbutting Materazzi? Cantona's kung fu kick? The list goes on.

    This incident has been blown way out of proportion. Broad was stupid, but he never meant to hit Haider. I for one am delighted to see an English cricketer bucking our historical trend of meek surrender and actually getting under the opponents' skins.

  • ifeelsikdal on August 13, 2010, 16:33 GMT

    Correction to previous post: One can understand him not wanting to be critical of his son, publicly, but he is also an ICC match referee. How would this come into play when he has to decide about another player found foul of the spirit of cricket?

  • ifeelsikdal on August 13, 2010, 16:30 GMT

    Well said Mr Chopra Worse offender for excusing Stuart Broad's behaviour was his dad on BBC Radio, he said and I quote "We don't want the game to be without characters". One can understand him not wanting to publicly, but he is also an ICC match referee. How would this come into play when he has to decide about another player found foul of the spirit of cricket?

  • Balumekka on August 13, 2010, 15:43 GMT

    More to add... Stuart Broad is nothing in exception to his "Dad". Chris Broad himself was a controversial cricketer who often refused umpire decisions, and as a match referee also he has a history of treating the Asian players harsh. Ponting-Aamir incident was just one example. Its high time for the Asians to get together and get rid of this racial match referee once and for all. At least the ICC people should have little bit of brain matter to appoint players with clean histories as match referees (like Clive Lloyd and Ranjan Madugalle).

  • Mark Illott on August 13, 2010, 13:47 GMT

    To those who remember the days of the mediocre mid-1990s fast medium English seamer, Broad is something of a revelation. Broad's stats - other than in the subcontinent - are pretty good for such a young player, and he has already contributed a decisive spell in a decisive Ashes test. Yes - he is a bit silly on the cricket pitch, and needs to grow up a bit - but fast bowlers ought to be a couple of sandwiches short of a picnic. When the petulance morphs into real menace we will see a genuine world class cricketer.

  • Huzaif on August 13, 2010, 13:28 GMT

    You hit the nail on the head! the tendency to mistake snobbishness and immaturity for aggression is increasingly manifesting itself in the cricketing psyche probably as a result of Australia's on field demeanors. however it is high time that the administrators of the game took some stringent steps to restore the game to its pre-modern "gentleman's game". Also teh reason needs to be investigated why western players get away scot free every time after each aberrant behaviour yet the Asian players are reprimanded severely for the same!

  • ravi on August 13, 2010, 12:58 GMT

    Iam not surprised at stuart broad's behaviour. chris, his father often refused to leave the crease after being given out. in today's scenario even with biased match referees chris' career would have ended even before it began

  • waterbuffalo on August 13, 2010, 11:23 GMT

    Though I am a die-hard Pakistan supporter, I can see both sides of the issue, one, fast bowling is very hard work, to paraphrase the immortal Geoff Boycott, two when you don't get an lbw or a catch is dropped, you are bound to get upset, it is human nature, it is not calculated sledging, as practiced by Australia, SA, NZ, and guys like Wasim and Zaheer and Botham, you try to do things, that will put batsmen off their game, McGrath and Warne were masters of that, Broad is not in the same category, I used to be an opening bowler, and I tried not to sledge the best batsmen, but I tried to irritate middle order and lower order batsmen, I never threw at them, just pretended that I was going to throw, it is part of cricket, and if you are not a bowler you wouldn't understand. You Batsmen just sit in the stands all day, or field in the slips, of course you can keep cool, try bowling ten overs and then field at square or fine leg, chasing a ball every over.

  • Joe on August 13, 2010, 9:46 GMT

    There is no mention of nationality or race in the article itself so why is that being brought up? I think those that cite these as factors in his punishment, or lack thereof, need to calm down, ignore the chips on their shoulders and leave the discipline to the authorities who are utterly equivocal in these matters.

  • Rauf on August 13, 2010, 9:03 GMT

    Broad is just an ordinary bowler who happens to be English and has daddy in the match referee office looking after him. This is the only reason he only gets slapped on the wrist every time he does something stupid while others like Suleiman Benn are handed match bans for doing much less then him. Too bad Pakistan team does not have a strong batting lineup or else someone need to step up and put Broad back in his place by giving him another "Yuvraj" treatment of hitting him out of the park few times.

  • mouth55 on August 13, 2010, 6:46 GMT

    Hearing about Broad's "punishment" I couldn't help but spare a thought for Sulieman Benn. Lemme get this straight, Steyn spits at Benn, and Benn gets banned for either 1 test or 2 ODIs. Broad wings one at the batsman because he's frustrated and he gets off with a 50% match fee dock? LOL where's the logic?? It's not as if Broad has a squeaky clean reputation either, I mean when you're an English bowler, and Nasser Hussain and Michael Vaughn both come out in public and say that you were tampering the ball, its not the greatest spot to be in. Hell, Hussein just wrote another article saying that Broad has been pushing his luck for way too long. I guess I'll just have to sit back and applaud Broad's ability to escape bans until the application of "spirit of cricket" offenses become more standardized.

  • Avi Singh on August 13, 2010, 5:58 GMT

    Goes to show why players like Dravid, Tendulkar, Laxman and Kumble have so much respect from fans and opponents- they have always conducted themselves with humility and decency.

  • Anonymous on August 13, 2010, 5:55 GMT

    "Sportsmen, mediocre ones especially, have a tendency to get frustrated when they are under pressure from their opponents" Well said sir. This is what I firmly believed about Stuart Braod. He is overly hyped cricketer with a mediocre talent playing in a team of an average bunch of players, doing well against minows & hence carrying a wrong notion. The senior Broad should have had a word with his son soon.

  • Ponting Khan on August 13, 2010, 5:49 GMT

    Sturt Broad is an energetic bowler, no doubt.But he's not even the best english bolwer yet. Agression alone won't get you anywhere. I have never seen the greatest living batsman, Sachin Tendulkar, throwing his bat around.

  • aitchin on August 13, 2010, 5:27 GMT

    Whilst I agree that some of Broad's behaviour needs to be tempered, this blog is clearly an over reaction. He is not the first petulant cricketer and this incident has been over hyped. Asif threw the ball at collingwood in england's first innings, the only difference being that collingwood ducked.

    secondly there is clearly a difference between frustration and pressure. Whilst one can lead to the other in some circumstances, that is not the case in this example. Broad was under no pressure, he took 4 wickets in the first innings and england were cruising to victory. It's not as if he was getting smacked around the park and pakistan were closing in on victory.

    There are question marks over broad's ability and suitability for the international game, but this blog misses the point.

  • Balumekka on August 13, 2010, 5:02 GMT

    Stuart Broad's stats show that he is worse than a part-time bowler (Avg. 34 in tests, playing mostly on pace and bouncy pitches), so he is an ordinary player by performances, and with this average I don't think he would qualify even for a fast bowler desert like Indian team. Here, his immature behaviors are surely due to his "Big Daddy". If dad'd high position makes Broad's behaviors more nasty, then its time for other countries to seriously think on getting rid of the Dad!

  • nande on August 13, 2010, 4:55 GMT

    This incident clearly illustrates a case of conflict of interest due to the position the father holds in the cricket referees'heirachy.Nobody has meted out the punishments that would have been thought normal & acceptable to the majority of the players as highlighted by some of the incidents that have occurred in the past, specially with the sub continental & West Indian players.

  • S Chougule on August 13, 2010, 4:06 GMT

    Nicely said by Dinesh: That if Stuart Broad so good off the field then keep him there. Why to get embarassed in front of the world and apologise, instead he can do better job "Baby sitting or Baby Feeding" off the field. However another white guy got off the hook very easily with minimal punishment as against toeir Aasian and West indian counterparts who get capital punishment for negligible issues. Racism and favouritism still exist and double standards are still prevalent. It just amazes me the kind of penal action taken against Sachin, Dravid and the Indian team before for petty issues and for no good reason and justification.

  • S Holmes on August 13, 2010, 1:54 GMT

    Samir, you're spot on. Broad is maybe the most mediocre, over-hyped juvenile on the international cricket arena. He only gets away because of his Dad......maybe he does call his mommy every weekend?! There is no excuse for petulance. Also, Duncan Fletcher is so basic bordering on the moronic; Mr. Fletcher he was frustrated because he was under pressure. Like 'Longmemory' wrote earlier - Broad just type Yuvraj 6 6's on any search engine and you can see how crummy and lame you really are! You surely have cemented your place in the record books - the mediocre who got hit for six 6's!

  • Joji on August 13, 2010, 1:52 GMT

    @Dinesh: Very well said mate. He just got a "tap-on-the-wrist" punishment coz he is an english man.

  • Chang on August 13, 2010, 0:37 GMT

    Bingo. Sorry to see u had the courage to put Broad in the line with those great players u mentioned In same line DAAHH

  • Shahid on August 12, 2010, 23:49 GMT

    The worst part of Broad story is when the coach, captain and Swan try to talk in diplomatic tones which are rather irritating. It could have been nice to hear them say, He crossed the line and what he did is wrong.

  • Dinesh on August 12, 2010, 23:09 GMT

    Mediocre bowler, petulant brat and no spine under pressure. If he's so great off the field, keep him there!

  • Madappa Prakash on August 12, 2010, 22:56 GMT

    Stuart Broad is behaving badly where it counts, and must be held accountable as others have been. That being said, I kept thinking of John McEnroe while I was reading this article as did one other reader. In my opinion, McEnroe would be an exception to the main sentiment expressed by Samir here that only mediocre players throw tantrums. Much as I hated his tantrums, McEnroe changed the way referees called the balls and forced technology to be a part of tennis. McEnroe at his best was really the best and it was a joy to watch his placements. I doubt that Broad will have similar contributions to cricket.

  • Nuur on August 12, 2010, 21:55 GMT

    @ Bingo Haley : "in-your-face types who are not necessarily mediocre: like Gambhir, Yuvraj, Afridi, Broad, Symonds etc"...dude these are all mediocres!!!

    clearly Viv Richards, Imran Khan, Gary Sobers, Len Hutton, Graeme Pollock were before your time.

    There is no excuse for bad behaviour, even if you're the worlds best player

  • Bingo Haley on August 12, 2010, 20:23 GMT

    In sport, including cricket there are aggressive, in-your-face types who are not necessarily mediocre: like Gambhir, Yuvraj, Afridi, Broad, Symonds etc.

    So don't pontificate as if you have the inside dope, "Sportsmen, mediocre ones especially, have a tendency to get frustrated when they are under pressure....."; John McEnroe was probably before your time.

  • Longmemory on August 12, 2010, 19:39 GMT

    Samir, here's my post on the Guardian in response to Fletcher. As you can see, we are more or less on the same page: "What a load of baloney. Why is a player's demeanor in the dressing room a better sign of his character than when he's out playing and in the thick of things? The latter is by far the better arena in which to see what a man is all about. So all the rest of us who don't have the privilege of interacting with the very pleasant Mr Broad in the dressing room just have to take Fletcher's word on it and get on with our lives I suppose.At least Jones had the decency to properly apologize to Hayden. Broad is a mediocre bowler with a big head. I am just waiting for the 1st day of the Ashes when he's going to be carted all over the park at 6-an-over -I'd like to see if he throws a hissyfit then. A word of advice for Broad: every time you think you are the cat's whiskers - go to youtube.com and plug "Yuvraj 6 6's" and watch - it'll bring you down to earth better than anything can."

  • Nain Tara Zeb on August 12, 2010, 19:18 GMT

    Totally agree.....he should be given a bit harsher punishment then this because then can we assure ourselves that we wont witness such school boyish scenes on cricket grounds !

  • Anonymous on August 12, 2010, 18:58 GMT

    Nice point raised. He got away with ONLY a fine because he is white, wait till this is done by a brown or a black cricketer (excluding Indians)........and see how he gets banned from a fair amount of matches, along with fines.

  • ken on August 12, 2010, 18:42 GMT

    I have long maintained that Stuart Broad is clearly protected by the cricketing gods-that-be.How else does one explain the variance between his tap-on -the wrist punishment now received for the first time and the punishments meted out to Pakistani,Indian and West Indian players over the years for less serious infractions?

  • Yusaf Khan on August 12, 2010, 17:48 GMT

    Well said Samir. The senior Broad should have had a word with his son also rather than focusing on Muhammad Amir's post wicket taking celebrations.

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  • Yusaf Khan on August 12, 2010, 17:48 GMT

    Well said Samir. The senior Broad should have had a word with his son also rather than focusing on Muhammad Amir's post wicket taking celebrations.

  • ken on August 12, 2010, 18:42 GMT

    I have long maintained that Stuart Broad is clearly protected by the cricketing gods-that-be.How else does one explain the variance between his tap-on -the wrist punishment now received for the first time and the punishments meted out to Pakistani,Indian and West Indian players over the years for less serious infractions?

  • Anonymous on August 12, 2010, 18:58 GMT

    Nice point raised. He got away with ONLY a fine because he is white, wait till this is done by a brown or a black cricketer (excluding Indians)........and see how he gets banned from a fair amount of matches, along with fines.

  • Nain Tara Zeb on August 12, 2010, 19:18 GMT

    Totally agree.....he should be given a bit harsher punishment then this because then can we assure ourselves that we wont witness such school boyish scenes on cricket grounds !

  • Longmemory on August 12, 2010, 19:39 GMT

    Samir, here's my post on the Guardian in response to Fletcher. As you can see, we are more or less on the same page: "What a load of baloney. Why is a player's demeanor in the dressing room a better sign of his character than when he's out playing and in the thick of things? The latter is by far the better arena in which to see what a man is all about. So all the rest of us who don't have the privilege of interacting with the very pleasant Mr Broad in the dressing room just have to take Fletcher's word on it and get on with our lives I suppose.At least Jones had the decency to properly apologize to Hayden. Broad is a mediocre bowler with a big head. I am just waiting for the 1st day of the Ashes when he's going to be carted all over the park at 6-an-over -I'd like to see if he throws a hissyfit then. A word of advice for Broad: every time you think you are the cat's whiskers - go to youtube.com and plug "Yuvraj 6 6's" and watch - it'll bring you down to earth better than anything can."

  • Bingo Haley on August 12, 2010, 20:23 GMT

    In sport, including cricket there are aggressive, in-your-face types who are not necessarily mediocre: like Gambhir, Yuvraj, Afridi, Broad, Symonds etc.

    So don't pontificate as if you have the inside dope, "Sportsmen, mediocre ones especially, have a tendency to get frustrated when they are under pressure....."; John McEnroe was probably before your time.

  • Nuur on August 12, 2010, 21:55 GMT

    @ Bingo Haley : "in-your-face types who are not necessarily mediocre: like Gambhir, Yuvraj, Afridi, Broad, Symonds etc"...dude these are all mediocres!!!

    clearly Viv Richards, Imran Khan, Gary Sobers, Len Hutton, Graeme Pollock were before your time.

    There is no excuse for bad behaviour, even if you're the worlds best player

  • Madappa Prakash on August 12, 2010, 22:56 GMT

    Stuart Broad is behaving badly where it counts, and must be held accountable as others have been. That being said, I kept thinking of John McEnroe while I was reading this article as did one other reader. In my opinion, McEnroe would be an exception to the main sentiment expressed by Samir here that only mediocre players throw tantrums. Much as I hated his tantrums, McEnroe changed the way referees called the balls and forced technology to be a part of tennis. McEnroe at his best was really the best and it was a joy to watch his placements. I doubt that Broad will have similar contributions to cricket.

  • Dinesh on August 12, 2010, 23:09 GMT

    Mediocre bowler, petulant brat and no spine under pressure. If he's so great off the field, keep him there!

  • Shahid on August 12, 2010, 23:49 GMT

    The worst part of Broad story is when the coach, captain and Swan try to talk in diplomatic tones which are rather irritating. It could have been nice to hear them say, He crossed the line and what he did is wrong.