Indian Premier League February 20, 2008

The day cricketers sold like stocks

On-field action aside, we could have just witnessed the most eventful day in cricket's history, one when players were bought like stocks at a share market
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Adding to the glitz was the presence of Bollywood stars such as Shah Rukh Khan, whose company owns the Kolkata franchise ... © AFP
 

Click here for a blow-by-blow account of the auction

On-field action aside, we could have just witnessed the most eventful day in cricket's history, one when players were bought like stocks at a share market. In the frenetic Indian Premier League auctions, which lasted 10 hours in the Hilton Towers in Mumbai, six players raked up more than a million dollars each, and over 70 others earned immediate financial security. In one day of tradings, the face of world cricket has been changed: for better or worse, is for time to tell.

Mahendra Singh Dhoni and Andrew Symonds were the big winners on a day when Indian and Australian players were the most wanted. A whopping US$14.6 million was spent on 25 Indians, including big sums for those on the fringe, while the 13 Australians were worth US$6.7 million, with relative unknowns like Cameron White and David Hussey thriving among the big daddies.

The auction wasn't without its surprises. Glenn McGrath was not picked up in the first set of bids and needed to wait till the end before he was bought at the base price. In contrast Ishant Sharma, a bowler just two seasons old, benefitted immensely from the recent performances, ending as the costliest bowler in the pool.

The trends were hard to miss. Teams have not looked to buy just match-winners; they have invested in a mix of cricketers and brands. The fact that Dhoni is getting more than double of what Gilchrist will is a case in point. As for the young players, especially the batsmen, the franchises have all preferred the popular over the proven: Robin Uthappa was worth more than Matthew Hayden and Ricky Ponting put together. Stunningly Yusuf Pathan, who's played just one Twenty20 international, was deemed about three times more valuable than the experienced Scott Styris.

The day kicked off with the blockbuster news of Dhoni being bought for US$1.5 million by Chennai. That set the ball rolling, and no other player was able to catch up with it by the end of the day. Dhoni was part of the first group of players (the marquee players) to be auctioned and grossed more than double what Adam Gilchrist did ($700,000 from Hyderabad). It took the franchises only about 20 to 25 minutes to decide the teams for the six biggest names in the fray.

The second round of bidding featured some more senior players for sale, and surprisingly McGrath and Mohammad Yousuf didn't find any takers. It was later learnt that Yousuf was a disputed property as he had been asked by the court not to participate in any league that is rival to the Indian Cricket League (ICL). Harbhajan Singh and Sanath Jayasuriya were the big draws in this round and Mumbai dug deep into their pockets to procure the two. While a $975,000 salary might not be too high for Jayasuriya, Harbhajan's taking away $850,000 did come as a surprise.

After a brief lunch break, the kind we see in a rain-curtailed ODI, Andrew Symonds came pretty close to beating Dhoni. In the third round, featuring the star players from outside India, Symonds was bought by the Hyderabad franchise for $1.35m. The franchises would have known of Symonds's decision to not tour Pakistan later this year, because Ricky Ponting and Matthew Hayden - two other Australians auctioned in the same round - were not fought for nearly as hard and went for $400,000 and $375,000 respectively. The New Zealanders, Brendan McCullum and Jacob Oram, were interesting picks as they drew $700,000 and $675,000 from Kolkata and Chennai respectively.

Bangalore, who were relatively quiet till then, surprised all by digging deep into their coffers to procure Jacques Kallis for $900,000, while Kolkata bought Chris Gayle for $800,000 in the fourth round of biddings, which featured stars who were perhaps one rung lower than the top draw.

By the end of the fourth round, one could vaguely look into how the teams were going about their selection. Hyderabad, for example, were going all out for big hitters: Symonds, Gilchrist, Herschelle Gibbs, and Shahid Afridi had cost them $3.3m by then. Mohali were looking for solid batsmen (Mahela Jayawardene and Kumar Sangakkara) and a fiery pace attack (Brett Lee and Sreesanth).

Kolkata were going for a more equitable distribution of salary, not bidding outrageously for superstars but looking to get as many good players as possible, while Jaipur kept their cards close to their chest, having spent only $1.15 by the end of four rounds.

In the fifth round, Delhi surprised everybody in the auction for wicketkeepers - spending $825,000 for two wickekeepers, Dinesh Kartik getting $125,000 more than AB de Villiers. Bangalore followed their trend of banking in safe players and picked Mark Boucher for $450,000.

The allrounders, the hot properties in Twenty20 cricket auctioned in round 6, had more surprises in the offing. Irfan Pathan, whose bidding started at $200,000, was finally bought by Mohali for $9,25,000. His brother, Yusuf, and Cameron White, another largely untested player at the international level, were bought for $475,000 and $500,000 respectively. No-one, though, was ready to pay a dollar more than his base price of $175,000 for Scott Styris.

When it come to the young batsmen, it was down to the real box office. India's dashing Twenty20 stars were showered with money while Mohammad Kaif, Suresh Raina and Manoj Tiwary - those not part of the World Twenty20 squad, got their share too. David Hussey was the only non-Indian lesser-known batsman, to draw a favourable response from the bidders. David actually found more takers than brother Mike, and was bought by Kolkata for $625,000; bidding for him started at $100,000.

By the time we moved to the last round of auction, for the lesser-known bowlers, the franchises were spent, both physically and financially. Umar Gul, one of the best bowlers in the Twenty20 world championships, was bought for a mere $150,000 by Kolkata, while Chaminda Vaas, Makhaya Ntini, and Dilhara Fernando all went for their base prices. But Kolkata offset the Gul steal and stung the last surprise of the day by buying Ishant for a whopping $950,000.

Things have happened too fast to make a sense of it or predict where we are headed, but in one day one thing was proven: in a free-market environment, the players' worth and selections would not be judged by how they played, but as a commercial commodity.

Top ten players at the auction
Player Franchise Base price Winning bid
Mahendra Singh Dhoni Chennai 400,000 1,500,000
Andrew Symonds Hyderabad 250,000 1,350,000
Sanath Jayasuriya Mumbai 250,000 975,000
Ishant Sharma Kolkata 150,000 950,000
Irfan Pathan Mohali 200,000 925,000
Jacques Kallis Bangalore 225,000 900,000
Brett Lee Mohali 300,000 900,000
RP Singh Hyderabad 200,000 875,000
Harbhajan Singh Mumbai 250,000 850,000
Robin Uthappa Mumbai 200,000 800,000

Icon players
Player Franchise Price
Sachin Tendulkar Mumbai 1,121,250
Sourav Ganguly Kolkata 1,092,500
Yuvraj Singh Mohali 1,063,750
Rahul Dravid Bangalore 1,035,000
Virender Sehwag Delhi 833,750
All figures in US$. Icon players' price calculated at 115% of next-highest earning player in the same franchise.

Sidharth Monga is a staff writer at Cricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • ptoodle on February 22, 2008, 11:07 GMT

    I think the IPL is a joke, It's biased of course, How can Rookies and Has-Beens fetch higher prices than Legends of the game, It's all a gimmick by overpaid millionaires that know nothing about cricket, Australia is the no.1 side in the world in test and oneday formats and have the flexibility in thier side that has dominated for a decade, There issome talented rookies coming through in the world but i can't even see how even Kallis from Sth. Africa is worth 900,000 and Sharma (An up and coming talented blowler with a big future) is 50,000 less, And Ponting at over 400,000, What a joke, The whole things a joke, Let's go to Pakistan boys

  • Akshayshah16 on February 22, 2008, 1:26 GMT

    It's gonna be fun to watch Andrew Symonds play with indian cricketers......haha... caz of the harbhajan thigi

  • Retour on February 22, 2008, 1:00 GMT

    After seeing how the bidding has gone, the IPL is sounding more like a joke. Can't believe that Mumbai paid $800k for Bhajji!!!! And then some teams shelled out big bucks for some current aging OZ players who may not even play for 2 out of the 3 yrs contract!!!! Whats the point in giving Ponting $400k if he is probably going to show up in the 3rd yr of the IPL and may be when not at his best? May be if a proper schedule, along with a window for IPL, for international matches is worked out then majority of the international stars can play the IPL from next yr onwards. Clearly, the players to go for would be mostly from the sub-continent and preferably under 30.

    2nd thing is may be the teams could be better classified instead of cities. May be two teams from each zones with their specific names like say from West, Trojans and Kings and so on.

    just my 2 cents

    cheers

  • krish_Farah on February 21, 2008, 21:11 GMT

    This a great break for cricketers who are just about to retire or facing the end of their career. @ Esudvum - Treat this as a business and a really lucrative one! The more you are able to invest , the more returns you are bound to get. So Poor Indians.. It aint our turns just yet! @ ShrikantHathi - Why such a negative take on this? Think about the cricketers, thier families .. If you were a cricketer and I offer you this opportunity, why would you shun it? Dont forget, its a Win - Win situation .. For cricketers/ the board and spectators too!!.. I am not not going to miss the action.. Its really entertaining!!

  • tutul on February 21, 2008, 20:36 GMT

    It is really ridiculous. IPL will be played in India where pitches are FLAT. Fast bowlers can't bowl to their potential in India. Sheer fact that Ishant Sharma fetched more than ponting and Bret Lee speaks for itself about the knowledge and understanding of the bidders. I sincerely hope that the whole thing is BIG finacial flop and ends in disaster for IPL and BCCI. This has NOTHING to do with cricket or cricket loving public. Will players lose money ( if they get relative to their price) if they don't perform? How many of these players are used to playing cricket in 45 degrees celsius!!! Lets see the fun not the scores and casualties of all the International cricket council member countries before it comes to a graveyard.

  • Rajesh. on February 21, 2008, 18:53 GMT

    The whopping amount of money being spent on players and franchisees in the IPL has been ridiculous to say the least and cricket seems to be going the soccer way. So, we might soon see club games attracting more attention than international games which would be utterly ridiculous.

    And to think that all these are Twenty20 games is even more ridiculous. It's really a shame. The ICC has been talking about promoting the Test Cricket, which is the 'Real Cricket' and now this. Surely the money rich BCCI are controlling the game and it certainly doesn't seem too good for the game. May be it would make some of the officianados of the BCCI even more richer like how it has made the so-called T20 icons richer. Cricket certainly deserves better !!

  • ultrascan on February 21, 2008, 17:54 GMT

    What an irony that a person from one of the poorest and backward states in the country has the largest paycheque. Would he think of his state's annual budget? A small percentage of this fee can keep some of the homeless and desperately poor people in his state away from misery. The whole thing is surreal and Immoral. This is really two Indias. Also corporate India's real ugly wealth is now in the open. If it indeed is so wealthy then really it is a shame and a matter of great concern of its total indifference and lack of social conscience. Cricket has indeed gone ugly and lost its sense of proportion. India can now buy Brett Lee for Rs 4 crores or more but cannot still feed all its population two square meals. Nearly 40 Million US Dollars has now been doled out much of which is going outside the country . If the cricketers( Indians involved) have any sense of morality or conscience, every penny of their earnings needs to go to the poor.

  • debapriyo on February 21, 2008, 15:14 GMT

    Well... they're spending sooo much. Where will they get the money back from? Many people will probably watch the games, but will they watch the games more than they watched the world cup or the T20 world cup? I doubt. I do not understand the calculations here, but aren't they spending more than what they'd have spent in a T20 world championship?

  • gandhik1 on February 21, 2008, 15:05 GMT

    This is a good start for revolutionizing the game. No doubt the tournament is going to get the viewers like no other domestic tournaments have ever got. However it is important to realize that this sort of tournaments are only placing the second tier teams around the world into a ditch (a grand total of one player from low ranked teams). To really improve this game, strong steps need to be taken to include them. Give them a chance to improve their cricket also. I am tired of watching the same teams go at it again and again. The ICC should realize that not a single cricket team has emerged as competitors in the last 20 years. Furthermore West Indies is loosing their lustre. Get to these teams before rival leagues get there and steal the best out of them. I do beleive this is a revelution and this is only a tiny section of it. Don't forget there are more cricket teams in the world out there that you don't hear about everyday.

  • gandhik1 on February 21, 2008, 14:40 GMT

    I love the IPL. I am excited and can't wait till Tendulkar gets his shots going against Shane Warne again. Shane Warne ... a lil piece of advice. Don't let the Nightmares get ya...

  • ptoodle on February 22, 2008, 11:07 GMT

    I think the IPL is a joke, It's biased of course, How can Rookies and Has-Beens fetch higher prices than Legends of the game, It's all a gimmick by overpaid millionaires that know nothing about cricket, Australia is the no.1 side in the world in test and oneday formats and have the flexibility in thier side that has dominated for a decade, There issome talented rookies coming through in the world but i can't even see how even Kallis from Sth. Africa is worth 900,000 and Sharma (An up and coming talented blowler with a big future) is 50,000 less, And Ponting at over 400,000, What a joke, The whole things a joke, Let's go to Pakistan boys

  • Akshayshah16 on February 22, 2008, 1:26 GMT

    It's gonna be fun to watch Andrew Symonds play with indian cricketers......haha... caz of the harbhajan thigi

  • Retour on February 22, 2008, 1:00 GMT

    After seeing how the bidding has gone, the IPL is sounding more like a joke. Can't believe that Mumbai paid $800k for Bhajji!!!! And then some teams shelled out big bucks for some current aging OZ players who may not even play for 2 out of the 3 yrs contract!!!! Whats the point in giving Ponting $400k if he is probably going to show up in the 3rd yr of the IPL and may be when not at his best? May be if a proper schedule, along with a window for IPL, for international matches is worked out then majority of the international stars can play the IPL from next yr onwards. Clearly, the players to go for would be mostly from the sub-continent and preferably under 30.

    2nd thing is may be the teams could be better classified instead of cities. May be two teams from each zones with their specific names like say from West, Trojans and Kings and so on.

    just my 2 cents

    cheers

  • krish_Farah on February 21, 2008, 21:11 GMT

    This a great break for cricketers who are just about to retire or facing the end of their career. @ Esudvum - Treat this as a business and a really lucrative one! The more you are able to invest , the more returns you are bound to get. So Poor Indians.. It aint our turns just yet! @ ShrikantHathi - Why such a negative take on this? Think about the cricketers, thier families .. If you were a cricketer and I offer you this opportunity, why would you shun it? Dont forget, its a Win - Win situation .. For cricketers/ the board and spectators too!!.. I am not not going to miss the action.. Its really entertaining!!

  • tutul on February 21, 2008, 20:36 GMT

    It is really ridiculous. IPL will be played in India where pitches are FLAT. Fast bowlers can't bowl to their potential in India. Sheer fact that Ishant Sharma fetched more than ponting and Bret Lee speaks for itself about the knowledge and understanding of the bidders. I sincerely hope that the whole thing is BIG finacial flop and ends in disaster for IPL and BCCI. This has NOTHING to do with cricket or cricket loving public. Will players lose money ( if they get relative to their price) if they don't perform? How many of these players are used to playing cricket in 45 degrees celsius!!! Lets see the fun not the scores and casualties of all the International cricket council member countries before it comes to a graveyard.

  • Rajesh. on February 21, 2008, 18:53 GMT

    The whopping amount of money being spent on players and franchisees in the IPL has been ridiculous to say the least and cricket seems to be going the soccer way. So, we might soon see club games attracting more attention than international games which would be utterly ridiculous.

    And to think that all these are Twenty20 games is even more ridiculous. It's really a shame. The ICC has been talking about promoting the Test Cricket, which is the 'Real Cricket' and now this. Surely the money rich BCCI are controlling the game and it certainly doesn't seem too good for the game. May be it would make some of the officianados of the BCCI even more richer like how it has made the so-called T20 icons richer. Cricket certainly deserves better !!

  • ultrascan on February 21, 2008, 17:54 GMT

    What an irony that a person from one of the poorest and backward states in the country has the largest paycheque. Would he think of his state's annual budget? A small percentage of this fee can keep some of the homeless and desperately poor people in his state away from misery. The whole thing is surreal and Immoral. This is really two Indias. Also corporate India's real ugly wealth is now in the open. If it indeed is so wealthy then really it is a shame and a matter of great concern of its total indifference and lack of social conscience. Cricket has indeed gone ugly and lost its sense of proportion. India can now buy Brett Lee for Rs 4 crores or more but cannot still feed all its population two square meals. Nearly 40 Million US Dollars has now been doled out much of which is going outside the country . If the cricketers( Indians involved) have any sense of morality or conscience, every penny of their earnings needs to go to the poor.

  • debapriyo on February 21, 2008, 15:14 GMT

    Well... they're spending sooo much. Where will they get the money back from? Many people will probably watch the games, but will they watch the games more than they watched the world cup or the T20 world cup? I doubt. I do not understand the calculations here, but aren't they spending more than what they'd have spent in a T20 world championship?

  • gandhik1 on February 21, 2008, 15:05 GMT

    This is a good start for revolutionizing the game. No doubt the tournament is going to get the viewers like no other domestic tournaments have ever got. However it is important to realize that this sort of tournaments are only placing the second tier teams around the world into a ditch (a grand total of one player from low ranked teams). To really improve this game, strong steps need to be taken to include them. Give them a chance to improve their cricket also. I am tired of watching the same teams go at it again and again. The ICC should realize that not a single cricket team has emerged as competitors in the last 20 years. Furthermore West Indies is loosing their lustre. Get to these teams before rival leagues get there and steal the best out of them. I do beleive this is a revelution and this is only a tiny section of it. Don't forget there are more cricket teams in the world out there that you don't hear about everyday.

  • gandhik1 on February 21, 2008, 14:40 GMT

    I love the IPL. I am excited and can't wait till Tendulkar gets his shots going against Shane Warne again. Shane Warne ... a lil piece of advice. Don't let the Nightmares get ya...

  • version1 on February 21, 2008, 12:39 GMT

    IPL will change cricket and how it is played forever. It will defenietly bring more money in to cricket and showmenship etc. It will have its good and bad. To what extent only time will tell. But the auctions were misleading and at some points ridicules. I mean Ricky Ponting for 400,000 and Ishant sharma for 950,000??? Ponting easily is one of the best batsmen in the world. And Ishant Sharma just a kid who has played only .. what?? 10 one dayers??? I mean really .. thats just rubbish. And other guys like Hayden, Jayawardena and Hussey for such low prices.. And some guy name David Hussey who i never even heard about went for double that much. I think these bids will be redone when the season is over, when clear minds will prevail. As i've heard IPL will allow players to transfer after its first season. And all these prizes will shift and change, and the real champions will emerge out of the Ashes.

  • KandB on February 21, 2008, 12:30 GMT

    Think your production of events absolutely marvellous.Thankyou Really looking forward to being able to see what is happening and wonder will be be having any T>V> coverage

  • Ashaythegreat on February 21, 2008, 12:05 GMT

    what a waste spending so much money on cricketers?why don't they do this for other tournaments lik ranji trophy?

  • shahid on February 21, 2008, 10:32 GMT

    The disappointment is that no english cricketer is their to play amongst the best cricketers in the world. Its more important than money.

    The most notable player who was missing for auction was Misbahul Haq. Who played very well in 20 20 world cup.

  • Tirupatirao on February 21, 2008, 10:22 GMT

    this great news for world cricket, around the world cricketers have got good price , sensation created by IPL.

  • ShrikantHathi on February 21, 2008, 9:06 GMT

    Surely High Court or Supreme Court Judges have suo-moto power to call for make a case and stop auction of cricketers and while doing so heavy penalty and imprisonment should be imposed to all participating.

    Gamblers please leave cricket alone, alternatively all cricketers to stop playing cricket and stop making a mockery of the game !

    Can there not be an enquiry on this ?

  • skchai on February 21, 2008, 8:14 GMT

    This one-day auction format was bound to throw up a bunch of crazy valuations. It may increase the hype, but shows up the league as a plaything for the idle rich. What is truly amazing is that they thought it wise to bind teams to these prices for three years. Also, Symonds being worth three times as much as Ricky Ponting is one thing, but VVS Laxman will probably feel even more shortchanged. He was supposed to be Hyderabad's "icon" and thus highest-paid player, but reportedly volunteered to give this up so that the team could bid more for other players. So now his auction value is 1/3 of that of his teammate Symonds.

  • donkeySOUP on February 21, 2008, 7:43 GMT

    Good to see such developments in the cricketing space. I see people criticize this commercialization of cricket (especially in India). For a country starved of frequent successes in games (chess is not mass appealing & hockey success happened pre cable tv times), cricket was a gift. For the tired corporate brains, workmen & laymen, cricket was a kind of stress reliever. Afterall what for we make money. Either spend the earned money or don't earn excess money. Having made money, it is foolish not to spend it. And for many in India, cricket is one game for which they are ready to spend, bcos it gives value for the money spent.

    Watch out friends, this T20 form of cricket is gonna give a tough fight for football in the coming years. I wrote a mktg analysis on this immediately after T20 world cup. The link is given below:

    http://am-not-ok.blogspot.com/2007/09/football-vs-t20-cricket.html

  • girishnks on February 21, 2008, 7:26 GMT

    How will these matches be anything more than exhibition matches? I fail to understand how cricket played between 2 cities will gather the kind of passion that normal cricket played between countries generate? Picture this - Brett lee of JAIPUR bowling to Sanath Jayasurya of MUMBAI OR Shoaib Akhtar of CALCUTTA bowling to Jacque Kallis of BANGALORE....it generates about as much enthusiasm in me as anyone would have to watch Ram Gopal Varma ki aag !! BCCI has gone completely berserk and is trying to show its financial muscle in a most ostentatious display of wealth that is doing no good to the game...sure...times are changing and so cricket needs to change...but to expect a traditional country specific sport like cricket and try and convert it into club or city based is ridiculous..Cricket is at its best and most passionate when played between countries..the fervour, the passion and the pride cannot be replaced by what in my opinion is going to degenerate into another TV reality Show

  • esudvum on February 21, 2008, 7:16 GMT

    I'm very happy to see all this big price bid's by chennai,banglore,mumbai,hyderabad..... but i still feel is this amount really worth spendingn for these players... if 50% of the amount spent on welfare of poor people[under poverty line]... think people think... Indians are shining but not poor Indians.. we still say India is a poor country but I wonder after reading things of this sort... this is best way to develop CRICKET...but not the country....

    JAI HIND!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • sachshj on February 21, 2008, 6:30 GMT

    This is insane, the whole concept, teams, money, stars, it saddens to see that future cricket stars like Ishant and Rohit Sharma will be wasted on this. God help them..this is outrageous. Have we all Indians lost our senses and sense of balance. Killing a sport which is at its best left like a sport not an item number.

  • Jiwan11 on February 21, 2008, 5:54 GMT

    Amazing stuff... Next step should be to float these franchises on the Mumbai Stock exchange. I am sure there would be a great deal of interest from smart investors.

  • Revnq on February 21, 2008, 5:10 GMT

    I find all this IPL action absolutely fascinating and I can't wait until it all kicks off. My only regret is that the approach seems to be more business-centric than an actual desire to win the tournament, which I guess I can't really whine about as I'm not stumping up a fortune to buy a team! Go Mohali!

  • samcadub on February 21, 2008, 4:36 GMT

    where will be the factor of patriotism in these type of contest (IPL)? factor of patriotism is the most important factor in any sport & without that the sport will be like body without soul. cant imagine indian & aussie payers playing for the same team. i dont believe in this type of commercial sports & it will not last long

  • Baadshah on February 21, 2008, 4:30 GMT

    i dont agree with all these bidding.... no value for good cricketers... future of cricket seems very dark...

  • anil on February 21, 2008, 4:14 GMT

    I think the cricket is going mad.From now, all will play for money.Here i dont think they play sportively, the man who perform well be the highest payable

  • satishgv on February 21, 2008, 4:08 GMT

    i hope IPL will become a blast hit tourney if all its signed players participate. it seems as IPL franchises have gone for a long term goal than for a short term, which is good for cricket. great retired bowler such as glen mcgrath and the present stars ponting,hayden and hussey were bought for a lower price. i see this IPL as a platform for youngstars....u-22 players. they should use this as a golden oppurtunity and utilise to the maximum extent.

  • niraa on February 21, 2008, 1:18 GMT

    just to know whether this price money which a player is bought for......goes in full to that particular player or a percentage of that??

  • Atomboy on February 21, 2008, 0:37 GMT

    I dont really agree with the way the cities have picked the players either the people who both them have no cricket sense and were just looking at the names rather than the person's capabilities............ I really pity Scott Styris the this man if i had the money i would bid about 80.000 USD for.

  • Tanaka_Yakuza on February 21, 2008, 0:37 GMT

    Well well well...Am i the only one who thinks that we are back to those good old(??!!) days of slave auctions ?? Instead of letting players directly talk with the owners, BCCI trying to cash in further by selling them in an auction . For me this nothing but a disgusting, uncivilized action. Also I am very much eager to hear the comments of cricinfo experts. Wonder what they have to say about this barbaric auction ?

    Ayesh

  • patil1pd on February 20, 2008, 23:58 GMT

    This whole scenario has started looking ugly. Cricket is losing its purity to commercialization. It will also diminish importance of international contests. No doubt it would find its base where sensation is liked over class. I fear Cricket in India is going the way Indian medial has become now. I wonder how the organizers still defend their claim of "finding talent" where the class is ignored to the brands.

  • MR_AM on February 20, 2008, 23:34 GMT

    some over the top prices for players who didn't make any impact what so ever in the 20/20 world cup.

    I think Ponting, Gul, Younus Khan and Warne were all a steal. I cant believe the man who single handedly was the best player at the 20/20 world cup Misbah Ul Haq wasnt even offered a contract!

  • rphanikanth on February 20, 2008, 22:53 GMT

    Good for the indian players that they were all well bargained for. Most of it should have been because of the 4 foreign players in playing XI rule. But I am not too sure of IPL's success. With the cost of ads comparable to World Cup ads, I am not sure the organizers will be able to make good profits. If they don't make profits, the price of players will come down substantially.

  • nadeemalekar on February 20, 2008, 21:51 GMT

    hi does this mean the players earn what was paid for them? i.e. does dhoni now earn 1.5m dollars for the season?

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • nadeemalekar on February 20, 2008, 21:51 GMT

    hi does this mean the players earn what was paid for them? i.e. does dhoni now earn 1.5m dollars for the season?

  • rphanikanth on February 20, 2008, 22:53 GMT

    Good for the indian players that they were all well bargained for. Most of it should have been because of the 4 foreign players in playing XI rule. But I am not too sure of IPL's success. With the cost of ads comparable to World Cup ads, I am not sure the organizers will be able to make good profits. If they don't make profits, the price of players will come down substantially.

  • MR_AM on February 20, 2008, 23:34 GMT

    some over the top prices for players who didn't make any impact what so ever in the 20/20 world cup.

    I think Ponting, Gul, Younus Khan and Warne were all a steal. I cant believe the man who single handedly was the best player at the 20/20 world cup Misbah Ul Haq wasnt even offered a contract!

  • patil1pd on February 20, 2008, 23:58 GMT

    This whole scenario has started looking ugly. Cricket is losing its purity to commercialization. It will also diminish importance of international contests. No doubt it would find its base where sensation is liked over class. I fear Cricket in India is going the way Indian medial has become now. I wonder how the organizers still defend their claim of "finding talent" where the class is ignored to the brands.

  • Tanaka_Yakuza on February 21, 2008, 0:37 GMT

    Well well well...Am i the only one who thinks that we are back to those good old(??!!) days of slave auctions ?? Instead of letting players directly talk with the owners, BCCI trying to cash in further by selling them in an auction . For me this nothing but a disgusting, uncivilized action. Also I am very much eager to hear the comments of cricinfo experts. Wonder what they have to say about this barbaric auction ?

    Ayesh

  • Atomboy on February 21, 2008, 0:37 GMT

    I dont really agree with the way the cities have picked the players either the people who both them have no cricket sense and were just looking at the names rather than the person's capabilities............ I really pity Scott Styris the this man if i had the money i would bid about 80.000 USD for.

  • niraa on February 21, 2008, 1:18 GMT

    just to know whether this price money which a player is bought for......goes in full to that particular player or a percentage of that??

  • satishgv on February 21, 2008, 4:08 GMT

    i hope IPL will become a blast hit tourney if all its signed players participate. it seems as IPL franchises have gone for a long term goal than for a short term, which is good for cricket. great retired bowler such as glen mcgrath and the present stars ponting,hayden and hussey were bought for a lower price. i see this IPL as a platform for youngstars....u-22 players. they should use this as a golden oppurtunity and utilise to the maximum extent.

  • anil on February 21, 2008, 4:14 GMT

    I think the cricket is going mad.From now, all will play for money.Here i dont think they play sportively, the man who perform well be the highest payable

  • Baadshah on February 21, 2008, 4:30 GMT

    i dont agree with all these bidding.... no value for good cricketers... future of cricket seems very dark...