Photo: Trent Bridge 1996

Menacing in Nottingham

Scaring silly point
November 11, 2013

© PA Photos
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If you want an action-packed shot, in photographic and batting terms, you can scarcely do better than this one taken at Trent Bridge in 1996. Sachin Tendulkar's fierce cut - minimalist in style when compared to Brian Lara's rotating wrists and shoulders - puts Nasser Hussain and Jack Russell on the defensive. All three are frozen at a different elevation, so much so that it looks like three separate cut-outs have been pasted together to make an unreal photo.

Tendulkar gave a chance before scoring but Atherton failed to hold on at gully. He went on to score 177, his tenth Test century and fourth against England. Hussain also made a hundred, his second in the series, but had to to retire hurt when he fractured his right index finger on the final over of day three. Russell took three catches and was dismissed for a fifth-ball duck.

The Test was drawn and England won the series 1-0. In 11 more Tests in England, Tendulkar scored only one more hundred, though he was dismissed in the 90s three times.

Posted by   on (November 13, 2013, 16:48 GMT)

Only God can make such a shot....

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Zaltz Stats

550,000,000
The approximate number of people in India today who had not been born when Sachin Tendulkar made his Test debut in 1989 (calculated from these figures). His batting has been so erotically outstanding that the global population has increased by almost 2 billion during his career, with the biggest increase, understandably, in India itself.

I have played cricket for 24 years, it has been only 24 hours since retirement, and I think I should get at least 24 days to relax before deciding these things.

Sachin Tendulkar doesn't want to think of what lies ahead just yet