Queensland's chairman Chris Simpson has confirmed the state association remains allied with New South Wales and the Australian Cricketers Association (ACA) in questioning Cricket Australia's chosen remedy for the financial effects of the Covid-19 pandemic, as all three organisations continue to push the governing body for more information.

While Queensland Cricket announced on Monday that it would be cutting 32 staff from its books in anticipation of a 25% funding cut from CA, Simpson said this move was necessary largely because his state was in a far weaker position than NSW, the other dissenter. Queensland's most recent annual report listed reserves of A$7.6 million among total assets worth A$18.3 million, far less than NSW or Victoria, to name two states, can call upon.

At the same time, Simpson outlined that, as reported by ESPNcricinfo, Queensland's board was trying to ensure that its agreement would see any reduction in distribution for 2020-21 revised back upwards if the summer produced a more favourable financial result than CA is currently forecasting.

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"We have not signed the agreement," Simpson told News Corp. "We are trying to learn how long their proposed cuts run for. It is a bit ambiguous how they have presented it. We want clarity on the term and we also want to make sure 25% is the ceiling.

"We also want to make sure that should things be better than what they are modelling - and every day we are getting more positive about the prospect of serious cricket content this season - we don't want to lock into something that is to the detriment of the states."

Simpson's words are similar to those conveyed by the NSW chairman John Knox and his chief executive Lee Germon to staff and stakeholders earlier this month. "As a result of the Cricket Australia proposal, some states have already reduced their commitment to community cricket, potentially impacting the long-term future of the game," they said in an email. "We believe that any decision to reduce the agreed state distributions should be delayed until there is a better understanding of whether international cricket will be played next season."

The ACA has contacted states and indicated a willingness to preserve community staffing and programs via financial assistance from the "grassroots fund" carved out of MoU cash and overseen by both the ACA and CA. The fund has dished out almost A$4.5 million in funding for equipment and facilities since 2017, and is expected to have about A$3 million available this year. CA is due to give its latest indicative forecast of Australian Cricket Revenue - from which the players' fixed percentage of revenue is derived - by Friday.

Queensland's cuts have included a major downsizing of the Brisbane Heat's operation and the exit of the long-serving selector, coach and manager Justin Sternes. They have also seen community cricket programs significantly affected, but Simpson said the state had been left with little option.

"We have been told for a long time how big a deal the Indian tour is, so to hear that optimism brings the depth of the cuts into focus," Simpson said. "Eighty percent of our funding comes from one source [CA] and they have said they potentially have solvency issues, so it is our duty to act on that information. We disagree with a lot of the information provided but we still had to act. NSW have a very big book and they can ride it out. We can't."

The Australia and NSW fast bowler Mitchell Starc, meanwhile, has given his strong support to the state's own decision to push back against CA. "In terms of NSW they've been pretty strong in holding their position and I think from the little updates I've read from NSW, it's a big part of their plan - to be part of growing the game in the state," he said

"That's obviously where we have all come from, as international and elite cricketers, we've come from the junior clubs to grade clubs all the way to international cricket. Full credit to the NSW board in trying to, at this stage, hang onto all of their staff and their grass roots at the moment.

"Cricket hasn't lost any games yet in this country, obviously the Bangladesh [tour] has been postponed but there hasn't been any cricket lost yet. So it's going to be an interesting few weeks with state contracting then us all returning to training - I guess we're going to see what staff we've got."