7/39 - Neil Wagner's figures - the fourth-best ever for New Zealand in Tests. The list is topped by Richard Hadlee's 9 for 52 in Brisbane in 1985-86, which is the only instance of a New Zealand bowler taking more than seven wickets in a Test innings.

1 - Sunil Ambris became the first ever player to get out hit wicket off the first ball of his Test career. Overall, he is the 11th player to be dismissed hit wicket on Test debut. The last West Indies player to get out hit wicket was Darren Sammy against Bangladesh in 2011.

12.5 - Wagner's strike rate - 7 for 39 in 14.4 overs - is the second-best among the 17 instances of seven wickets or more for a New Zealand bowler in an innings. The only better seven-for for New Zealand in terms of strike rate was Hadlee's 7 for 23 in 8.3 overs against India, also in Wellington, in 1976, a strike rate of 9.5.

2006 - The last time a New Zealand bowler took a seven-wicket haul at home: Daniel Vettori took 7 for 130 against Sri Lanka in Wellington. Wagner's haul is the 10th seven-for by New Zealand bowlers at home. Between 1998 and 2006, there were five such hauls for New Zealand at home but this by Wagner's is the first in about 11 years. In these 11 years, there have been two seven-fors by New Zealand bowlers - Tim Southee against India in Bengaluru in 2012 and Mark Craig against Pakistan in Sharjah in 2014-15.

4 - Five-wicket hauls by Wagner in Tests since the start of 2016. All other New Zealand bowlers combined have managed only three such hauls - two by Southee and the other by Colin de Grandhomme. Wagner has picked 70 wickets in 15 Tests in this period at an average of 22.32. Among all fast bowlers, only Kagiso Rabada (seven) and James Anderson (six) have picked up more five-fors since 2016.

3 - Number of seven-wicket hauls against West Indies in Tests this year. Before Wagner, Yasir Shah and Anderson also achieved a similar feat this year. Against the other nine teams combined, there have been only two seven-fors in 2017 - one each against India and Bangladesh.

22 - Runs added by West Indies' third to seventh wickets in this innings - their third-least ever and the lowest in the last 30 years. Their middle order collapsed from 79 for 2 to 97 for 7 after the openers shared a stand of 59 runs.

Bharath Seervi is stats sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo. @SeerviBharath