"Full and straight! The Bangladesh tigers have knocked the England lions out of the World Cup!"

The rattle of James Anderson's stumps was accompanied by a fittingly punchy bit of TV commentary from Nasser Hussain to put the tin lid on England's disastrous tournament. But forget the familiar narrative of English World Cup misery, this was also, in Hussain's words once again, "one of the greatest days in Bangladesh cricket history", as Rubel Hossain delivered the decisive blows under lights in Adelaide.

England have had their problems with tigers before, of course - specifically Imran Khan's "cornered" pack in 1992. That was just about the last time they were credible candidates to lift the trophy, too. While the World Cup's return to Australia and New Zealand after 23 years developed into a feast of attacking cricket, England were still serving up stodgy pies; four games into the 2015 group stage, they had been ignominiously thrashed out of sight by both host nations and Sri Lanka.

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Still, Eoin Morgan's side stood an even chance of reaching the quarter-finals, if they could just beat Bangladesh - a team against whom they had a 21-2 record across all formats.

Never mind the big-cat pretensions, England have long been kings of the bungle. Chasing 276, after Mahmudullah had shored up the innings with the first World Cup hundred by a Bangladeshi, England were picked apart with predatory intent. Mashrafe Mortaza and Taskin Ahmed made inroads, while the rapid Rubel finished with 4 for 53, clawing out England's last two wickets with 16 runs needed from the final 12 balls. The prize: Bangladesh's first World Cup quarter-final.

Alan Gardner is an associate editor at ESPNcricinfo. @alanroderick